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Topic: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: 747hogg
Posted 2006-09-13 06:17:06 and read 3558 times.

I was wondering if anyone knew the history of the great experiment whereas the government slams a fully fueled 707 into steel grates to see if, sure nuff'... the thing blows up! What did that plane do for an honest living before some goons with a grant made a jolly good toy out of it?

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: Da man
Posted 2006-09-13 06:23:38 and read 3548 times.

I believe that a/c was actually a 720 owned by the FAA.

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: 4holer
Posted 2006-09-13 06:23:57 and read 3548 times.

I believe it was a 720.
I could Google it, but...

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: Jetjack74
Posted 2006-09-13 07:07:02 and read 3472 times.


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Quoting 4holer (Reply 2):
I believe it was a 720.

It was a 720-027 form the Braniff block, but never flew for BN. An order NTU, so FAA purchased it

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: Symphonik
Posted 2006-09-13 09:01:13 and read 3382 times.

Here is the video of that:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=nRfRHgOUkCo

Some guys have all the cool jobs.  cheeky 

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: GQfluffy
Posted 2006-09-13 15:05:55 and read 3155 times.

Quoting 747hogg (Thread starter):
a fully fueled 707 into steel grates to see if, sure nuff'... the thing blows up!

I thought it was a test on some sort of new fuel that wasn't supposed to explode...

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: Khobar
Posted 2006-09-13 16:00:21 and read 3087 times.

Quoting GQfluffy (Reply 5):
I thought it was a test on some sort of new fuel that wasn't supposed to explode...

It was a test of a fuel additive that was supposed to prevent misting in the event of a crash (landing). Unfortunately the plane came in at a poor angle and an engine took a direct hit from one of the can openers. Thus fuel poured out onto white hot engine parts - under those conditions there was no preventing any fuel from igniting.

Years ago there was a documentary that explained that although the fireball looks very impressive and certainly leaves most with the notion that the test was a complete failure, apparently the fireball was a much lower temperature that would normally occur, possibly providing additional time for "survivors" to get out.

Alternate angle: http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Movie/CID/Medium/EM-0004-02.mpg

Topic: RE: The Nasa 707 That Was Crashed, What A/L?
Username: Jetjack74
Posted 2006-09-13 21:41:13 and read 2876 times.

Quoting 747hogg (Thread starter):
I was wondering if anyone knew the history of the great experiment whereas the government slams a fully fueled 707 into steel grates to see if, sure nuff'... the thing blows up! What did that plane do for an honest living before some goons with a grant made a jolly good toy out of it?

The aircraft was owned by, as Da man said by the FAA and based in OKC at the FAA operational headquarters. It was also at ADW very often. I was built in 1962 for BN, but was not taken up, and was transferred to Boeing Commercial sales for a year before it was sold to the FAA along with another Braniff-spec 720, it reg was N7078. It flew as a transport for FAA, DOT, and NTSB personnel to inspect wreakage and move safety teams conduct audits of Aviation operators. It was relieved from theis job when they acquired a 727 in 1973. The 720 then went on to be used as a testbed for the space programme, and was also used to as a testbed for pilotless aircraft, which is how it became used controlled crash in 1984. The aircraft firast carried a side number as N-113 in 1963, but then was changed to N-23 in 1965. It was stored in 1977 for a few years at MHV and TUS. It was leased to Sperry Technologies, Unisys, and Honeywell before it was flown to EDW in 1981. It was there until it took it's final flight in 1984. It only had about 5,000 hours on it when it was crashed. It's last reg was N2697V.

[Edited 2006-09-13 22:06:55]


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