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Topic: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: rolypolyman
Posted 2010-08-03 11:07:29 and read 22758 times.

I got some really old maps out of storage last week and found this circa-1970 Gulf road map of the DFW area. What caught my eye was the grandiose plans for DFW Regional Airport:


(Click to enlarge)


I don't know whether anything like this has been posted, but, man, where to begin. Thirteen terminals instead of the four that were initially built, a STOL Airport, a 5800 ft long cargo facility, and a separate and equally gigantic "world trade center" cargo facility. The runways if built fully would measure 19,000 ft in length (I did analyze the image). The northwest diagonal runway is 11,500 ft, instead of the current 9300 ft. Look at the southern fringe of the airport... there's even an "industrial airpark" with a 3800 ft east-west runway.

I'd be curious to know whether they were ever serious about all this or whether it was just an ultimate expansion proposal. I did find a September 1973 newspaper story in Google News archives showing that the runway lengths were fixed at 11,400 ft and 9,000 ft (diagonal), so I'm suspecting it wasn't the oil crisis that kept this plan from unfolding.

Man, someone ought to render all this for MS Flight Simulator.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: jfk777
Posted 2010-08-03 11:22:45 and read 22577 times.

Texas has always been an ambitious place, look at the new Dallas Cowboys Stadium. Braniff was ambitious and they probaly thought the SSC of the late 1970's required 19,000 feet to takeoff for Europe and Asia. Well the SSC never came to be and Braniff had to keep its "Fat Albert" 747's. Some DFW runays have reached about 2 and a half miles in length, enough for 777 to get to Asia.


AA has built a new international terminal at DFW in addition to the original 4 terminals. DFW has become a well balanced hub with flights to Brazil, Argentina and Europe. Unfortunately more foreign airlines fly to Houston then to DFW but then AA doesn't make life too pleasent for teh competition.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: contrails
Posted 2010-08-03 11:29:47 and read 22532 times.

That map shows how much things have changed since the 70's. DFW now has 7 runways, IIRC, and the area around it has grown up.

The map even shows the old GSW airport, which was still there for a while in the 70's. Of course, it's headquarters for AA now.

Lots of memories there.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: ssides
Posted 2010-08-03 11:39:11 and read 22411 times.

Another reason for this ambition was, at the time, the lack of hub-and-spoke network systems and the existence of less fuel-efficient aircraft.

If I'm not mistaken, it was thought at the time that, due to its central location, DFW could become a "base" (not technically a "hub") for many different airlines. The idea was that each airline could have its own terminal.

Of course, this didn't play out.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: BMI727
Posted 2010-08-03 11:48:30 and read 22312 times.

Quoting rolypolyman (Thread starter):
Man, someone ought to render all this for MS Flight Simulator.

Maybe you could just wait a year or two and check out DWC.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: WA707atMSP
Posted 2010-08-03 11:50:40 and read 22290 times.

In the late 1960s, other airports had plans that were equally grandiose.

JFK, for example, was planning to fill in Jamaica Bay for a mid field terminal complex and a third 13 / 31 runway.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: tharanga
Posted 2010-08-03 12:43:10 and read 21982 times.

Airport nursery? What's that about? Trees? Babies? Cessnas?

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: Renfro747
Posted 2010-08-03 16:26:50 and read 21317 times.

I had the privilege of touring DFW before it was opened to the public in 1973. My grandfather was a member of the Airport Ground Tansportation Association, and this was the highlight of that years convention in Arlington. Also included was a tour of the newly opened American Airlines training facility.

Even though I was younger than 10 years old, this was an epic experience that set me on aviation for the rest of my life.
Very interesting to see the "Grand Plan"... Love the STOL-port!

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: commavia
Posted 2010-08-03 16:44:54 and read 21009 times.

A few notes:

1. Those "grandiose" plans are not solely a product of the 1970s. As recently as 1997, the DFW Master Plan called for a somewhat-less-grandiose, but still intriguing, design of several new terminals in a different pattern but following the general layout along International Parkway. The plan includes designs for Terminal 3W - which would ultimately become Terminal D - as well as the long-discussed/-debated Terminal F. In successive phases, it also envisioned two elongated, north-south midfield terminals (5E or 5W) south of the present terminal area, and south (on the east side of the highway) of what was then the big Delta cargo facility.

2. That airport to the southwest in that picture is not a design - it was real. That is Greater Southwest Airport, which was at one time a fairly busy airport serving Fort Worth. As many on here probably already know, the north-south runway from that airport is now Amon Carter Boulevard, on which AMR/American Airlines is headquartered. The far north end of that runway - which stretches north across 183 - is still clearly visible from a satellite view (or out the window of the plane on landing or takeoff!). Up until just a few years ago, more of GSW was visible - one could still see the outline in the grass of where the approach road long was for the terminal. Only recently has that field been torn up to develop the enlarged CentrePort development in that area - including a new hotel, etc.

3. That airport on the area west of the runways did, indeed, end up being the West Maintenance area of the airport - just about all of which is now occupied by AA's sprawling maintenance operation there. Interestingly, not on the map - though understandably so - is the former Braniff headquarters office which still stands on the spot where this map is marked "Auto Parking" right next to that "Airline Maintenance" area.

On one final note - wow, look at Grapevine! It is pretty astounding to think of what that map looks like for Grapevine all the way back then, and considering the development that has happened in that area since then. And, if the map stretched a little further north to Southlake - that would probably look even more insane compared with how built up that area is now.



[Edited 2010-08-03 16:57:52]

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: Western727
Posted 2010-08-03 16:52:50 and read 20855 times.

One word: WOW!!!

Thanks, rolypolyman, for posting.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: rangercarp
Posted 2010-08-03 17:44:42 and read 20139 times.

Quoting rolypolyman (Thread starter):
a STOL Airport

What is an STOL airport?

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: PITrules
Posted 2010-08-03 17:46:58 and read 20104 times.

What's amazing is that while only a fraction of the original terminals are built, the number of full length runways (not including the STOL port) already exceeds the original plan as 17L/35R had to be subsequently planned and added to allow 3 simultaneous IFR arrival streams. An 8th runway was also later proposed (not in the original plan) on the far west side, west of the mx area to allow 4 simultaneous IFR arrivals. Unfortunately if built, this runway would intersect 13R/31L, and as it was not in the original plans there is not the same amount of generous buffer between the runway and surrounding development as the other main runways enjoy.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: BMI727
Posted 2010-08-03 17:51:48 and read 20046 times.

Quoting rangercarp (Reply 10):
What is an STOL airport?

An airport with a short runway, which therefore is limited to STOL aircraft. They were kind of a fad in the 1970s, at least in concept, but are being used successfully today with Toronto Island Airport and London City.

As far as I can tell, they seemed to come in two varieties. The first was an entire airport that would be located in close proximity to the downtown area, like LCY or YTZ.

The second was a shorter runway at a large airport for the commuter aircraft to use which would reduce congestion on the larger runways, which I think was the intent with runway 15L/33R at Boston.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: rolypolyman
Posted 2010-08-03 18:11:47 and read 19770 times.

Quoting tharanga (Reply 6):
Airport nursery? What's that about? Trees? Babies? Cessnas?

Holy cow... I just now noticed that. It's on the southeast tip of that southern cargo terminal. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume it's a plant nursery for all the landscaping, but who knows... maybe they envisioned a 10-acre Chuck E Cheese.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: Longhornmaniac
Posted 2010-08-03 18:39:45 and read 19384 times.

What an amazing plan, thanks for sharing! Don't forget, based on the scan, the entire east half of the airport is missing. I'd love to see what the east side looks like.

Assuming 30 gates/terminal, that rendering has room for almost 400 gates at that airport!


Thanks again!
Cheers,
Cameron

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: rfields5421
Posted 2010-08-03 18:49:50 and read 19245 times.

Quoting rangercarp (Reply 10):
Quoting rolypolyman (Thread starter):
a STOL Airport

What is an STOL airport?

A third concept which was part of the DFW plan at one time was to use STOL aircraft to shuttle high end passengers from the 'remote' airport like DFW to airports close to downtown - FTW and DAL or RBD. Also from key outlying areas.

The thought was that a more remote major airport would be feasible if people could shuttle in STOL aircraft from their local airport to the main airport. One thing missing on the plan map is the level of parking to support that many terminals and passengers. The plan apparently did not anticipate the number of passengers who will drive to the airport and need parking. I would love to see the map/ plans for the Dallas County side of the airport.

I also remember seeing newspaper articles about something like that STOL shuttle planned between NRT and HND back in 72.

Obviously did not work out.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: JAAlbert
Posted 2010-08-03 19:01:01 and read 19091 times.

Quoting tharanga (Reply 6):
Airport nursery? What's that about? Trees? Babies? Cessnas?

And not one, but two cemeteries! One of em is at the junction of two runways. That must be for the AA pilots when they pass on  

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: rolypolyman
Posted 2010-08-03 19:31:11 and read 18764 times.

Size comparison of the ultimate DFW plan with DWC (Dubai), each sized to the same scale:

http://imgur.com/UxR0G.jpg
(Click to enlarge)


Of course we can't see the east side of DFW, as I don't have that map, but it's a good comparison. It's also the best master plan of DWC I could find.. most of what turned up in Google Images was garbage. Airside, it kind of looks like the old DFW would have been a little larger.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: PITrules
Posted 2010-08-03 19:44:01 and read 18578 times.

Quoting Longhornmaniac (Reply 14):
Don't forget, based on the scan, the entire east half of the airport is missing. I'd love to see what the east side looks like.
Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 15):
I would love to see the map/ plans for the Dallas County side of the airport.

Here is the east side from the 1985 Layout Plan. I apologize for the quality of the images; I don't have a scanner so just took a picture of the diagrams. Anyway, in this first one the only really interesting aspect is a 150'x5000' runway and associated dual taxiways and ramps for an executive airport. Its kinda hard to make out even on the original print but is located where 17L/35R was instead built.

http://i644.photobucket.com/albums/uu162/JDawgphoto/IMG_2871.jpg

Here is the 1997 Layout Plan showing the west side and future 6th parallel runway (150'x9760') previously mentioned. Not popular with Grapevine as it was not in the original airport design. Gone is the STOL port. The east side looks pretty much as it is today.

http://i644.photobucket.com/albums/uu162/JDawgphoto/IMG_2874.jpg

Here's a postcard that was printed a few months before the airport's opening:

http://i644.photobucket.com/albums/uu162/JDawgphoto/IMG_2876.jpg

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: TSS
Posted 2010-08-03 22:21:02 and read 17062 times.

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 15):
One thing missing on the plan map is the level of parking to support that many terminals and passengers. The plan apparently did not anticipate the number of passengers who will drive to the airport and need parking.

Then as now, parking is within the center of each semi-circular concourse. Not a bad plan, really, since you could park in whatever terminal your airline operated from. Of course things didn't quite work out that way once AA started using three of the four available terminals; One could park in Terminal A, then have to get to Terminal C for departure, and return to Terminal B. Prior to the opening of the SkyLink train in 2005, this made for some very long walks from terminal to terminal*.

*The previous Airtrans (later called "TrAAin" ) system was uni-directional and moved at about half the speed of the SkyLink system, making it not terribly efficient for transferring passengers with tight connections.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: jfr
Posted 2010-08-04 02:04:46 and read 15665 times.

American Airlines Hub and HQ changed everything.

One very big hubbing operation can have a very chilling effect on other airlines. In the case of DFW, the AA Hub also eventually killed DFW's second hubber: DL.

So the question is this: would the Dallas / Ft Worth region be better off with one super Hub or a large number of non-hubbing airlines? There is sure a lot of service which the AA hub has made available.

Don't forget that most of the people calling the shots in the formation of the DFW plan were New Yorkers, who were focused on solving the kinds of problems JFK was facing. As others have said, the mid-continent mega-hubs were not in existence or even being dreamed about.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: rampart
Posted 2010-08-04 06:30:32 and read 13772 times.

Quoting rolypolyman (Thread starter):
found this circa-1970 Gulf road map of the DFW area. What caught my eye was the grandiose plans for DFW Regional Airport:


Great find, Rolypolyman! I remember my grandparents driving me out to the airport site, with all the earth movers and bulldozers. Heaven for a 4 year old. Texas Stadium was new then, too. I always wondered why they just didn't plug the hole in the dome. I mean, doesn't Dallas do things in a big way and finish them? Sorry, I digress.

Speaking of road maps, I'll have to dig up my Los Angeles area road atlas. It showed the configuration of the massive Palmdale International Airport, with 6 parallel runways and numerous terminals. Grandiose, and nothing came of it. Yet.

Quoting commavia (Reply 8):
1. Those "grandiose" plans are not solely a product of the 1970s. As recently as 1997, the DFW Master Plan called for a somewhat-less-grandiose, but still intriguing, design of several new terminals in a different pattern but following the general layout along International Parkway. The plan includes designs for Terminal 3W - which would ultimately become Terminal D - as well as the long-discussed/-debated Terminal F. In successive phases, it also envisioned two elongated, north-south midfield terminals (5E or 5W) south of the present terminal area, and south (on the east side of the highway) of what was then the big Delta cargo facility.

This is a good illustration of the evollution of passenger priorities at terminals. DFW in the 70s was the embodiment of the "drive to the gate" plan, like MCI (and the PanAm WorldPort debated in another thread). The blocky hexagonal terminals (Terminal D) allow for more passenger milling about (transfers). I'm not quite sure the benefit of long linear terminals (like DEN, ATL, DTW, and so on) for connecting purposes. It's a long way to walk whether it's in the shape of an I or a D. A triangular terminal or concourse like SVO or HAJ would seem better.

Great topic!

-Rampart

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: GSPSPOT
Posted 2010-08-04 06:38:07 and read 13667 times.

I once had a tourist picture book of the Metroplex that I got in the late 70's showing an overall artist's rendering of DFW , very much along the lines of the bottom image in reply 18, but showing the entire airport property with many, many terminal/concourse buildings, similar to the layout of the map the OP posted.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: commavia
Posted 2010-08-04 08:22:20 and read 12473 times.

Quoting jfr (Reply 20):
One very big hubbing operation can have a very chilling effect on other airlines. In the case of DFW, the AA Hub also eventually killed DFW's second hubber: DL.

So the question is this: would the Dallas / Ft Worth region be better off with one super Hub or a large number of non-hubbing airlines? There is sure a lot of service which the AA hub has made available.

All else being equal, I think most local development and business officials in the Metroplex would probably argue that having the AA hub has definitely been a net benefit to the region long-term, for several reasons.

For starters, having a major hub in the region has flowed literally tens of billions of investment and capital development into the airport - and, indirectly, into the region overall - that simply would not have ever happened absent a hub.

Beyond that, from a purely network and schedule perspective, having a hub facilitates a level of frequency and network breadth that simply would not be feasible if an airport was only served by non-hub carriers flying to their hubs. The Metroplex is a massive local market, and now the fourth largest population center in the United States, but even with that, it probably couldn't support 17 daily flights to LAX, or over 20 to the New York area, or even 5 to Knoxville, or 3 to Reno, or 3 to Toronto, etc. without the massive influx of connections a hub provides.

That increased hub connecting traffic drives better schedules which the local market can also benefit from, which in turn ultimately makes it easier to come to and do business in the area, which in turn drives business activity.

Plus, finally, as others have said - even though DFW only has one hub these days - AA, obviously - the Metroplex still has a massive presence from Southwest, which still has a major impact on the region's air service market (moreso for Dallas than Fort Worth, admittedly). And, even post-Delta-pullout, DFW is still very well-served by non-hub carriers with lots of flights each day to virtually every major O&D market in the U.S., and several internationally, driven by the massive size of the market here.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: WA707atMSP
Posted 2010-08-04 08:31:58 and read 12357 times.

Not many people know that DFW was originally planned to open with five terminals. Construction work had already begun on terminal 4W, which would have been for Continental, Frontier, and Eastern, but the downturn in airline traffic in the early 1970s caused DFW to "defer" construction of this terminal.

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 15):
A third concept which was part of the DFW plan at one time was to use STOL aircraft to shuttle high end passengers from the 'remote' airport like DFW to airports close to downtown - FTW and DAL or RBD. Also from key outlying areas.

Sadly, STOL aircraft were viable when jet fuel was 10 cents / gallon. The economics of these aircraft were destroyed in the early 1970s, when fuel prices began rising.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: ScottB
Posted 2010-08-04 09:38:01 and read 11616 times.

Quoting rolypolyman (Thread starter):
where to begin. Thirteen terminals instead of the four that were initially built

The original naming scheme for the terminals reflected what was intended in the master plan; that's why they started at "2E" and "2W" instead of "1E" and "1W." In the end, the terminal naming scheme wasn't terribly compatible with multi-terminal hub operations; i.e. connecting from Gate 2W-10 to Gate 3E-25 is a lot more confusing than connecting from Gate B-10 to Gate C-25. Interestingly, though, it appears that the map you posted had two additional terminals (at what would have been positions "0E" and "0W") to the north when compared to what was built.

Quoting commavia (Reply 8):
2. That airport to the southwest in that picture is not a design - it was real. That is Greater Southwest Airport, which was at one time a fairly busy airport serving Fort Worth.

But by the time DFW Regional was being planned, GSW had become a near ghost town as many airlines had consolidated service at DAL. The design of DFW, though, very consciously tries to avoid design decisions which contributed to GSW's failure -- DFW's terminal complex very nearly straddles the county line and the entrance to the terminal complex faces neither Dallas nor Fort Worth. GSW was closer to Fort Worth and had its terminals on the Fort Worth side of the property.

Quoting commavia (Reply 23):
Plus, finally, as others have said - even though DFW only has one hub these days - AA, obviously - the Metroplex still has a massive presence from Southwest, which still has a major impact on the region's air service market (moreso for Dallas than Fort Worth, admittedly). And, even post-Delta-pullout, DFW is still very well-served by non-hub carriers with lots of flights each day to virtually every major O&D market in the U.S., and several internationally, driven by the massive size of the market here.

I think the presence of Southwest at DAL (and similarly at HOU in Houston) has helped to keep network carrier hub fares from choking the local market; the convenience of many non-stop flights is important to business, but keeping travel costs down has also become increasingly important.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: contrails
Posted 2010-08-04 11:10:33 and read 10518 times.

The discussions about the STOL runways and heliport jogged my memory a bit. I know that there was once helicopter service from downtown Ft. Worth, and I presume downtown Dallas, to DFW in the late 70's/early 80's. Did that service use this area in the southwest corner of the airport, or did they use something else?

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: dfwcre8tive
Posted 2010-08-04 13:55:18 and read 10257 times.

There were some interesting graphics and diagrams in the DFW Airport Opening guide, which I've posted on Flickr; view the original images there for larger images / more detail.

DFW Airport: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dfwcre8tive/sets/72157618842236092/

Airtrans: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dfwcre8tive/sets/72157624068060607/

The guide also included some interesting terminal diagrams I'll have to upload soon.


Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: ScottB
Posted 2010-08-04 14:02:04 and read 10217 times.

Quoting dfwcre8tive (Reply 27):
There were some interesting graphics and diagrams in the DFW Airport Opening guide

Oddly, that graphic entitled DFW Airport 1973 has most of the terminal numbers mislabeled.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: dfwcre8tive
Posted 2010-08-04 14:05:34 and read 10200 times.

Quoting ScottB (Reply 28):

You're right; I never noticed that. I guess the number + E/W system was confusing even before opening!

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: txjim
Posted 2010-08-04 14:32:37 and read 10109 times.

Quoting dfwcre8tive (Reply 27):
Airtrans:

Ah, the old Airtrans! When DFW opened, it was not uncommon for people to travel to the airport (myself included) just to ride these things. It did have several operational issues and speed was never it's strong point but it was innovative for it's time. My father worked for Vought throughout Airtrans development and initial deployment so I was able to hear the other side to all the bad news about the system.

Thanks for posting the images on Flickr, I especially enjoyed looking at the Supervisory Computers diagram. Did you notice a whopping 64K of memory in the main CPU?

The original cars used Intel 4004 processors for control, this is about the same level of processing horsepower that an audio greeting card has these days.

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: DCA-ROCguy
Posted 2010-08-04 15:39:47 and read 9983 times.

Thank you rolypolyman and all for a great topic!

Quoting rampart (Reply 21):
This is a good illustration of the evollution of passenger priorities at terminals. DFW in the 70s was the embodiment of the "drive to the gate" plan, like MCI (and the PanAm WorldPort debated in another thread). The blocky hexagonal terminals (Terminal D) allow for more passenger milling about (transfers). I'm not quite sure the benefit of long linear terminals (like DEN, ATL, DTW, and so on) for connecting purposes. It's a long way to walk whether it's in the shape of an I or a D. A triangular terminal or concourse like SVO or HAJ would seem better.

With respect to all who like drive-to-the-gate terminals, I for one dislike them intensely. As hubs, they are impractical. In DFW's case the SkyLink was a much overdue, ten-figure remedy to the basic problem that you can only park planes on one side, which is inefficient for a/c ciruclation and creates long pax transit distances. No wonder DFW did not build the planned 1997 remote rectangular buildings; longer trains than SkyLink would have been required to get people to such remote buildings, and you still would have had to go through a landside terminal!

Yes, DTG is convenient for O & D, but such airports have no sense of place; function without form. DFW's original four concrete terminals were already featureless rings, and the SkyLink concrete forest only made the whole thing outright ugly. At least Terminal D looks good.

A well-designed traditional terminal with finger concourses can keep walking O & D walking distances manageable. So can a well-designed linear hub terminal, with enough moving sidewalks and underground trains. DTW's McNamara Terminal, for instance, is convenient as an O & D facility, even though it's a linear hub. I've made 30-minute connections there. Its buildings are nice-looking, too.

Quoting GSPSPOT (Reply 22):
I once had a tourist picture book of the Metroplex that I got in the late 70's showing an overall artist's rendering of DFW , very much along the lines of the bottom image in reply 18, but showing the entire airport property with many, many terminal/concourse buildings, similar to the layout of the map the OP posted.

There's a postcard of that (shown in Reply 27) rendering; one of those postcards turns up on E-Bay every so often.

Quoting WA707atMSP (Reply 24):
Not many people know that DFW was originally planned to open with five terminals. Construction work had already begun on terminal 4W, which would have been for Continental, Frontier, and Eastern, but the downturn in airline traffic in the early 1970s caused DFW to "defer" construction of this terminal.

Interesting. My guess is that the "insane" plans such as these for airports like DFW were also killed by....

Quoting rfields5421 (Reply 15):
Sadly, STOL aircraft were viable when jet fuel was 10 cents / gallon. The economics of these aircraft were destroyed in the early 1970s, when fuel prices began rising.[/quote]

...these same early 70's soaring oil prices.

Quoting ScottB (Reply 25):
I think the presence of Southwest at DAL (and similarly at HOU in Houston) has helped to keep network carrier hub fares from choking the local market; the convenience of many non-stop flights is important to business, but keeping travel costs down has also become increasingly important.

  

Large legacy hubs are a mixed blessing. They have historically had their price when there's been insufficient LCC competition (see CVG), but the restructuring US economy will likely put tighter and tighter discipline on that price premium. I for one suspect that the Metroplex economy would have developed just fine with or without the AA megahub, given its strong fundamentals. But given the Metroplex's location, size, and strength, it's hard to imagine that someone would *not* have developed a megahub there, in the post-Deregulation industry.

Quoting TSS (Reply 19):
*The previous Airtrans (later called "TrAAin" ) system was uni-directional and moved at about half the speed of the SkyLink system, making it not terribly efficient for transferring passengers with tight connections.

As Dave Barry once said, the TrAAm moved at the speed of fingernail growth, and at one point passed through Mexico. It was not sufficient to be the train that made the airport hang together.

Quoting ScottB (Reply 25):
But by the time DFW Regional was being planned, GSW had become a near ghost town as many airlines had consolidated service at DAL. The design of DFW, though, very consciously tries to avoid design decisions which contributed to GSW's failure -- DFW's terminal complex very nearly straddles the county line and the entrance to the terminal complex faces neither Dallas nor Fort Worth. GSW was closer to Fort Worth and had its terminals on the Fort Worth side of the property.

And GSW was operated, IIRC, by the city of Ft. Worth. Given the rivalry between the two cities, your observations make a lot of sense. That's another reason the Metroplex market can't be precisely compared to Denver--there aren't two rival cities with their own civic pride and corporate bases.

Notice that the map says "operational July 1973"--DFW didn't open until February 1974, must have been some delays?

Jim

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: GSPSPOT
Posted 2010-08-04 15:48:49 and read 9960 times.

That's it!! The image in Reply 27!!

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: GSPSPOT
Posted 2010-08-04 15:52:12 and read 9945 times.

WILL SKYLINK EVER GO TO THE CAR RENTAL CENTER??? (Caps intentional)

Topic: RE: Insane 1970s DFW Expansion Plans (with Map)
Username: ssides
Posted 2010-08-04 16:03:09 and read 9905 times.

Quoting GSPSPOT (Reply 33):
WILL SKYLINK EVER GO TO THE CAR RENTAL CENTER???

Not anytime in the near future. SkyLink is in the secure area of the terminal. Some major changes to the track layout would be necessary for it to travel to remote parking lots, car rental center, etc.


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