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Topic: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: boberito6589
Posted 2012-11-03 05:42:04 and read 9827 times.

Available for purchase today on usairways.com, US has added summer seasonal service to SNN starting May 22:

US 776 PHL-SNN 9:05P 8:40A 757
US 777 SNN-PHL 11:35A 2:35P 757

I suppose technically this is a resumption of service from a few years ago, but I believe that for awhile that service operated as SNN-DUB-PHL

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: SCQ83
Posted 2012-11-03 06:13:49 and read 9673 times.

How does SNN generate so much traffic to NA in summer? Western Ireland is sparsely populated, both Limerick and Galway (the largest cities served by Shannon Airport) have less than 100,000 inhabitants.

If I am not wrong, seven long-haul services are scheduled for Summer 13 (three to NYC metro):

Boston: Aer Lingus
Chicago O'Hare: United
Newark: United
New York JFK: Aer Lingus
New York JFK: Delta
Philadelphia: US Airways
Toronto Pearson: Air Transat

Are they mainly Irish-American flying to Ireland for holiday? I can't see much demand from the Irish side to fill seven (!) seasonal long-haul services, particularly now with the Irish recession and a very different economic outlook compared to just 4 or 5 years ago.

[Edited 2012-11-03 06:14:44]

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: cipango
Posted 2012-11-03 06:59:52 and read 9400 times.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 1):
Western Ireland is sparsely populated, both Limerick and Galway (the largest cities served by Shannon Airport) have less than 100,000 inhabitants.

Shannon doesn't just cover Limerick and Galway, but also the entire west of Ireland and also parts of the south E.g. Cork.

Despite Irelands economic downturn, people still travel during the summer. Last summer flights from Dublin to the USA went out with very healthy loads. Shannon will not be an exception, no doubt.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: YXD172
Posted 2012-11-03 07:03:21 and read 9384 times.

I can't speak to any of the US-bound flights, but the YYZ-SNN is a weekly flight that is routed YYZ-SNN-DUB-YYZ, so I'm not too surprised they make it work, given the ancestral ties between Canada and Ireland. Looks like it'll be operated by an A330 this year too!

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: gilesdavies
Posted 2012-11-03 07:27:21 and read 9264 times.

I think in US Airways' recent financial results they announced they would only be launching one new European route next summer and I guess this is it!

I was hoping they might try and have a second attempt at the PHL-BHX route.  

Bit disappointed, but Im sure US know what they are doing and this is a profitable route for them.

I also question where all the loads for the North American routes out of SNN come from too?

The whole of the Republic of Ireland only has a population of around 4 million (with nearly half of this population living in the greater Dublin area), which is similar to the population of some major European Cities! The nearest major city is Cork, and that only has a population of about 200,000 and about 75 miles away.

I am guessing the route is well served by American-Irish descendants visiting family and also the tourism to the west of Ireland is pretty important to the local economy too. But still struggle to understand how it supports so many routes!

On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?

[Edited 2012-11-03 07:44:12]

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: Polot
Posted 2012-11-03 07:38:10 and read 9185 times.

Quoting gilesdavies (Reply 4):
On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?

Probably a lasting ramification of the old Shannon stopover rule that Ireland use to have. US carriers have had a historic presence in Shannon because of the rule.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: flyingalex
Posted 2012-11-03 07:42:45 and read 9159 times.

Quoting gilesdavies (Reply 4):

On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?

My guess would be runway length. Cork's longest runway is only 2,133m/6,998ft long.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-03 07:43:13 and read 9160 times.

Quoting gilesdavies (Reply 4):
I also question where all the loads for the North American routes out of SNN come from too?

No need to question it - it's a very popular market with US tourists, large VFR traffic, and a very large presence of US companies in the Mid West region of Ireland.

SNN however has very little service to the European mainland - the affinity of this part of Ireland is to look west and not east; that's where the tourism, business and family ties are.

Great news for SNN though after some very difficult years!

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: kaitak
Posted 2012-11-03 07:51:20 and read 9095 times.

First of all, great news; I'm delighted that SNN has earned a new t/a service!

Quoting flyingalex (Reply 6):
On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?
My guess would be runway length. Cork's longest runway is only 2,133m/6,998ft long.

I'm also surprised, but I don't think a 7,000' runway would be a block to t/a 757 flight. Cork City has a population of 120k and the county has over 500k.

PHL already has a nonstop flight to DUB (and US also serves DUB from CLT during the Summer); Philadelphia (and indeed Pennsylvania) has a strong Irish population.

Ireland is on a major tourism drive next year which we call "the Gathering", to encourage the Irish diaspora home, for reunions etc and this will no doubt have figured in the SAA's push to US.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: speedbird9
Posted 2012-11-03 08:08:50 and read 8978 times.

Don't forget that the West of Ireland has a large IT sector including Intel, Dell (logistics not manufacturing) , Analog Devices, Veritas Software, RSA as well as other US companies:

- GE Capital
- Acuvue
- Procter & Gamble

Lots of business travellers from US HQ most likely

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: as739x
Posted 2012-11-03 08:30:35 and read 8675 times.

Quoting gilesdavies (Reply 4):
On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?

Shannon has a longer runway, more centrally located on the Ireland West side and has US Pre-clearance Customs.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 1):
How does SNN generate so much traffic to NA in summer?

When I took CO EWR-SNN a few years back there was an enormous amount of Golfers onboard. But I also believe there is a number of tourist who will start or end a Ireland vacation in Shannon, and start or end the journey in Dublin.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-03 09:11:30 and read 8230 times.

Quoting as739x (Reply 10):
When I took CO EWR-SNN a few years back there was an enormous amount of Golfers onboard. But I also believe there is a number of tourist who will start or end a Ireland vacation in Shannon, and start or end the journey in Dublin.

Yes, it's a fairly popular combination - you really do need a car to see the more beautiful sights in the western region here, and so it makes sense to fly into one part of the country and fly out from the other.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: mah4546
Posted 2012-11-03 11:27:16 and read 7069 times.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 1):
If I am not wrong, seven long-haul services are scheduled for Summer 13 (three to NYC metro):

Eight once Transaero's MIASNN application is approved.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-03 12:13:29 and read 6675 times.

Quoting mah4546 (Reply 12):
Eight once Transaero's MIASNN application is approved.

Yes, I'd heard such a rumour doing the rounds. Will be interesting to see the fares on SNNMIA, and if it can attract some local traffic.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: SCQ83
Posted 2012-11-03 12:17:09 and read 6634 times.

Quoting mah4546 (Reply 12):

Why no DME-DUB-MIA instead?

Dublin has no Miami service, and only seasonal Moscow with S7.

[Edited 2012-11-03 12:17:45]

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-03 12:27:32 and read 6536 times.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 14):
Why no DME-DUB-MIA instead?

Dublin has no Miami service, and only seasonal Moscow with S7.

Transaero have quite an interest in Shannon, having recently bought a substantial maintenance facility there, with apparently quite large expansion plans.

SNN is also uncongested, and pretty suited to transit stops. Dublin is congested at times through the day, and certainly during the peak hours for TATL flights.

Aeroflot are apparently starting a SVO-DUB route next year (bilateral renegotiations are going on at the moment), so that may remove any interest Transaero had in that market. Plus, Aer Lingus already have DUB-MCO, which is undoubtedly the bulk of the Dublin - Florida market.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: AmricanShamrok
Posted 2012-11-03 12:29:41 and read 6519 times.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 1):

How does SNN generate so much traffic to NA in summer? Western Ireland is sparsely populated, both Limerick and Galway (the largest cities served by Shannon Airport) have less than 100,000 inhabitants.

There are a number of factors to be considered:

1. Huge Irish diaspora in North America with a large proportion first-second generation Irish-American/Irish-Canadian.
2. SNN serves a large catchment area covering the whole mid-west of Ireland and parts of the south (including Ireland's third and fourth largest metro areas).
3. US CBP Preclearance - this reduces operating costs to US-based airlines as they can operate directly into their own gates and terminals on arrival in the US and so do not have to pay fees to the local government/city to utilize the communal international terminal. This is not the case for all airports but certainly BOS and ORD come to mind here.
4. SNN's location on the western fringe of Europe makes for a relatively short flight to the US east coast, with of course, no restrictions to 757 operations which are ideal to this market.
5. Airlines that launch new nonstop long haul operations from SNN benefit from a 100% discount on airport charges for the first year of operation with more discounts for the following four years.
6. SNN has an unrestricted runway, is uncongested and is open 24/7/365
7. SNN offers cheaper aviation fuel than many of its European counterparts developed under an agreement with Aeroflot back in the 1980s (although I don't know if this is taken into account by airlines when launching new routes!).

Quoting gilesdavies (Reply 4):
On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?

ORK has a smaller catchment area, a relatively restricted runway and no CBP preclearance. SNN will always be Ireland's second transatlantic gateway.

Quoting mah4546 (Reply 12):
Eight once Transaero's MIASNN application is approved.

Will UN sell SNN-MIA/MIA-SNN tickets for local O&D passengers? Assuming the flights will originate/terminate in Moscow?

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: mah4546
Posted 2012-11-03 12:34:36 and read 6457 times.

Quoting AmricanShamrok (Reply 16):
Quoting mah4546 (Reply 12):
Eight once Transaero's MIASNN application is approved.

Will UN sell SNN-MIA/MIA-SNN tickets for local O&D passengers? Assuming the flights will originate/terminate in Moscow?

Yes. That's the point of the stop. UN already flies MIADME non-stop. It will compliment that.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 14):
Why no DME-DUB-MIA instead

Because SNN is a maintenance base for UN.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-03 12:37:27 and read 6432 times.

Quoting AmricanShamrok (Reply 16):
3. US CBP Preclearance - this reduces operating costs to US-based airlines as they can operate directly into their own gates and terminals on arrival in the US and so do not have to pay fees to the local government/city to utilize the communal international terminal. This is not the case for all airports but certainly BOS and ORD come to mind here.
4. SNN's location on the western fringe of Europe makes for a relatively short flight to the US east coast, with of course, no restrictions to 757 operations which are ideal to this market.

I think these two points probably best show how a flight to SNN, or indeed DUB, is such an easy decision for lots of US carriers. It's an easy way to increase utilisation of your 757 fleet when they would otherwise lie idle, it can easily operate after / before a domestic rotation as it can use the same terminal (due to CBP), thus lowering costs.

In summer season, it's pretty hard to lose money flying from the US to Ireland, with very high loads, and decent yields at that time of year.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: styles9002
Posted 2012-11-03 13:18:04 and read 6100 times.

Great news for SNN and US Airways.

US appears to be doing well at the moment with their trans-Atlantic strategy. Hopefully, this Summer seasonal Shannon service will successful for them too.

While there will probably be a decent amount of O&D traffic for PHL, US does offer a lot of well-timed connections to the rest of the network ex-PHL.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: tonymctigue
Posted 2012-11-03 14:28:29 and read 5622 times.

Fantastic news for SNN! The perfect storm of the Open Skies, the recession and FR withdrawal have seen passenger numbers more than half since 2007. It seems as if things are finally starting to stabliise and looks like next year we mght actually see growth. SNN is due to be cut loose from the DAA pretty shortly so the timing of this and the recent UA announcement could not be better.

Quoting Polot (Reply 5):
On a seperate note, anyone know why Cork is always overlooked instead of Shannon as operating flights to the USA?
Quoting Polot (Reply 5):
Probably a lasting ramification of the old Shannon stopover rule that Ireland use to have. US carriers have had a historic presence in Shannon because of the rule.

If you ask a Cork person, it is because of the SAA and DAA are in cahoots to screw Cork out of ever getting a transatlantic service!

AmericanShamrock summed it up pretty well above. It basically boils down to the fact that SNN historically has had always had transatlantic services and has a proven demand for them, it has better facilities for handling larger aircraft (longer runway, larger apron, airbridges, fuel hydrants at gates, etc.), it has the CBP facility and it is more centrally located and better connected by road making it more accessible to a larger area of the country (e.g. combined population of Clare, Limerick and Galway alone is over 300,000).

Also may I add that the recent announcement by the government that one of the few road projects that will go ahead in the next few years is the M17/M18 which will make SNN easily acessible from as far away as South Mayo (NOC is doing well on European and UK routes but does not have transatlantic) and perhaps the new Lynx cargo facility that is due to be developed there might benefit cargo loads.

Quoting flyingalex (Reply 6):
My guess would be runway length. Cork's longest runway is only 2,133m/6,998ft long.

I think the runway length is not the problem but I believe there are issues with turning larger aircraft at ORK (although one can imagine that shouldn't be too much of a problem with a 757). The ill fated Flyglobespan managed to operate transatlantic from NOC for a brief period using a hodge podge combination of 737, 757 and 767 (depending on which aircraft was actually working on the day) with a runway length of 2300 m.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: slcdeltarumd11
Posted 2012-11-03 17:32:48 and read 4669 times.

Quoting SCQ83 (Reply 1):
Are they mainly Irish-American flying to Ireland for holiday? I can't see much demand from the Irish side to fill seven (!) seasonal long-haul services, particularly now with the Irish recession and a very different economic outlook compared to just 4 or 5 years ago.

I think the ancestral ties have almost nothing to do with all the service in the summer. Its purely tourism. Its a pretty safe and easy place for Americans to visit. I have tons of family and friends that have been to Western Ireland and i personally have gone there twice. Its a easy lower stress international vacation since they speak the same language and there really is little culture shock or things that are stressful on a vacation for Americans. Also remember that many Irish want to connect in PHL to visit Disneyworld, California, Las Vegas all popular destinations in the Summer the traffic is two ways and tourist generated in the summer. Probably a good add for US i wish them good luck.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: Viscount724
Posted 2012-11-03 17:41:37 and read 4612 times.

Quoting tonymctigue (Reply 20):
Quoting flyingalex (Reply 6):
My guess would be runway length. Cork's longest runway is only 2,133m/6,998ft long.

I think the runway length is not the problem

CO operated Bristol-EWR with 757s for a few years until they dropped the route in 2010. The BRS runway (6598 ft) is 400 ft. shorter than ORK, and it's over 200 nm further.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: SurfandSnow
Posted 2012-11-03 18:32:16 and read 4335 times.

Wow, to me this comes as a surprise. A few things come to mind:

- There has been chatter on here recently about US going to all widebody (762/332/333) in the transatlantic realm. I suppose that could still happen after this summer seasonal service comes to an end, but I have always doubted those rumors. The US East 757 ETOPS fleet continues to play a key role in opening up niche routes to smaller European markets from PHL - and now even CLT - and I would think they stick around until the A321 can cross the pond. I can't imagine routes like this one, existing ones like PHL-LIS/GLA, or perhaps future additions/resumptions like PHL-KEF/EDI/BHX/OSL/ARN/CPH could be expected to profitably support a larger (and much more expensive to operate) widebody aircraft.

- The worst of Ireland's economic woes appear to have passed, if Ireland's reability to finance its debt through the market and growing long haul air service are any indication. While a cloud of uncertainty still hangs over the eurozone and E.U. in general, it seems things in Ireland have stabilized and are even getting a bit better - in sharp contrast to the other 4 PIIGS countries. Several major airlines from North America (not just the U.S. but also Canada) and Middle East have been adding major capacity to Ireland's long haul gateways at DUB and SNN. In 2010, EY increased frequency on its AUH-DUB route (a route added in 2007 and subjected to the worst of the Irish/European/global economic crisis) from 7 to 10x weekly service. In 2011, AC increased its seasonal YYZ-DUB service from 6x weekly to daily and US added a new seasonal daily CLT-DUB service. In 2012, EK entered the Irish market with a daily DXB-DUB service and UA added a daily IAD-DUB service. In 2013, AA is adding daily JFK-DUB, UA is adding a seasonal ORD-SNN service, and now US will resume its PHL-SNN route! I suppose on the flip side it must be said that DL and EI have reduced their transatlantic services during the same timeframe - particularly from SNN - but still, it seems overall things are going quite well for both major Irish airports!

- Despite the ongoing economic and political turmoil in Europe, the U.S. airlines continue to see some opportunities in the transatlantic market for 2013. This in addition to increases we have seen in the past few years, all of those relevant to Ireland were mentioned above. UA will be resuming SFO-CDG (albeit after cutting IAH-CDG) and adding a new seasonal ORD-SNN service, AA just announced new ORD-DUS and JFK-DUB routes, and now US is resuming this route. Then again, DL has not been profitable in transatlantic as the other 3 have and continues to cut routes. I wonder if we will see anything else announced soon in terms of additions or cuts as airlines finalize their summer 2013 schedules...

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: slcdeltarumd11
Posted 2012-11-03 20:34:27 and read 3808 times.

I cant see US going to all widebody service across the pond. Of all the legacy airlines it seems like United and US would be the least likely to go all widebody across the pond i would think. US has routes that i cant imagine supporting a widebody, the 757 seems like a real necessity to their lineup for a while.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: usairways85
Posted 2012-11-03 21:33:51 and read 3803 times.

Also note this week US updated the PHL-DUB schedule to a 762 daily during the summer and PHL-BRU goes to a 752.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-04 03:57:32 and read 2937 times.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 23):
I suppose on the flip side it must be said that DL and EI have reduced their transatlantic services during the same timeframe - particularly from SNN - but still, it seems overall things are going quite well for both major Irish airports!

Not really - EI still deploys the same amount of capacity across the Atlantic, it just flies to fewer airports. Remember the IAD A330 is now back in Dublin and being used to expand ORD to twice daily.

DL have also remained fairly static.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: delta2ual
Posted 2012-11-04 06:02:04 and read 2572 times.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 23):
Then again, DL has not been profitable in transatlantic as the other 3 have and continues to cut routes.

Wait, just so I am understanding you correctly, are you saying AA, UA, and US have all been profitable transatlantic and DL hasn't? I'm asking because I just read in another thread that DL loses a billion dollars a year in NYC and they also lose money in LAX and SLC. Yet, DL made $750 million in the last quarter ($1 billion before "special items"). Where is DL making this money from? Surely, it can't be just ATL/DTW/MSP? The same DTW/MSP that people are complaining is too much high-cost 50-seat RJ?
I think US will do fine on the route. I will always root for them; in my mind they are still HP in many ways and my first airline job was with HP.  Smile

[Edited 2012-11-04 06:04:19]

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: by738
Posted 2012-11-04 06:28:00 and read 2489 times.

are we likely to see any other niche transatlantic additions to UK/Ireland ?
Had thought BHX-PHL, GLA-IAD/ORD might have been back on the cards, plus whatever the loco Air Canada might offer .. MAN/GLA/DUB/BFS ?

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: shamrock604
Posted 2012-11-04 06:31:31 and read 2486 times.

Quoting by738 (Reply 28):
Had thought BHX-PHL, GLA-IAD/ORD might have been back on the cards, plus whatever the loco Air Canada might offer .. MAN/GLA/DUB/BFS ?

Air Canada already do DUB-YYZ, daily in peak season. Rumour has it the new AC loco will go all year round. They are also rumoured to be starting MAN.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: AmricanShamrok
Posted 2012-11-04 11:59:20 and read 2151 times.

Quoting shamrock604 (Reply 26):
Not really - EI still deploys the same amount of capacity across the Atlantic, it just flies to fewer airports. Remember the IAD A330 is now back in Dublin and being used to expand ORD to twice daily.

Well, in 2007 EI were flying 9 A330s across the pond. Today, they are flying 7 as far as I know (St Patrick (EI-ELA), St Aoife, St Ronan, St Maincín, St Mella, St Keeva, St Columba). They offloaded one A330-200 (St Laurence O'Toole) and three A330-300s (St Patrick (EI-DUB), St Brigid, St Maeve) but replaced two of them.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: SCQ83
Posted 2012-11-04 12:37:59 and read 2027 times.

Quoting AmricanShamrok (Reply 16):

Thanks. Very interesting. I was aware of the possible market for this flight, but didn't know about SNN's particular advantages when coming to the price of fuel or the cheapest operation of a Pre-Clearance flight.

Quoting SurfandSnow (Reply 23):
- The worst of Ireland's economic woes appear to have passed, if Ireland's reability to finance its debt through the market and growing long haul air service are any indication. While a cloud of uncertainty still hangs over the eurozone and E.U. in general, it seems things in Ireland have stabilized and are even getting a bit better - in sharp contrast to the other 4 PIIGS countries. Several major airlines from North America (not just the U.S. but also Canada) and Middle East have been adding major capacity to Ireland's long haul gateways at DUB and SNN. In 2010, EY increased frequency on its AUH-DUB route (a route added in 2007 and subjected to the worst of the Irish/European/global economic crisis) from 7 to 10x weekly service.

I don't get the relation between Middle Eastern airlines adding capacity to Ireland with their economic recovery. To some extent, I can agree that US airlines adding more services might be a good symptom of it... but the US has been recovering as well. But Gulf airlines' new routes/capacity to Ireland has probably more to do with the other side booming (Middle East, India, Asia, Australia; more Irish doing business/living there, more Asians studying or vacationing in Ireland, etc.)

Middle Eastern airlines have been adding capacity to basically everywhere in Europe. For instance, Emirates just began services to Madrid as late as 2010 (1 daily). Two years later, EK offers 2 daily to Madrid, 1 to Barcelona and 1 to Lisbon. So basically they have gone from 0 to more than 1,400 daily seats in Spain/Portugal amid their worst recession in memory... quite impressive. And that hasn't stopped Qatar adding more frequencies and capacity to MAD and BCN, and Turkish adding secondary cities in Spain (VLC, BIO, AGP).

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: LAXintl
Posted 2012-11-05 07:20:42 and read 1574 times.

Here is their press release

US Airways Returns Seasonal Service To Shannon, Ireland
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/us-air...ns-seasonal-shannon-150000004.html

=

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: mcg
Posted 2012-11-05 07:31:12 and read 1559 times.

Why does the airplane spend 3 hours on the ground in SNN? That seems like a mighty long time to me.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: HPRamper
Posted 2012-11-05 09:04:32 and read 1542 times.

Quoting mcg (Reply 33):
Why does the airplane spend 3 hours on the ground in SNN? That seems like a mighty long time to me.

Is it timed so the return to PHL coincides with another bank for connections?

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: usairways85
Posted 2012-11-05 11:50:55 and read 1514 times.

Quoting HPRamper (Reply 34):
Is it timed so the return to PHL coincides with another bank for connections?

I thought the same. Anyone know the arr/dep times of the flight during the first go around with the route? A 2:35 arrival can be a little from extreme western European airports but it may be timed to allow for later connections out of PHL.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: by738
Posted 2012-11-05 13:30:01 and read 1505 times.

I think the GLA- PHL has a reasonable downtime also so its not unique

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: PHLwok
Posted 2012-11-05 13:54:02 and read 1498 times.

Quoting usairways85 (Reply 35):
Quoting HPRamper (Reply 34):
Is it timed so the return to PHL coincides with another bank for connections?

There are at least three full banks this should connect to - the one around 3:30-4:30pm local, the one around 6pm and the one in the 7-9pm range. Whether these are formally considered banks or not, I don't know, but US has a burst of departures around those times.

Quoting usairways85 (Reply 35):

I thought the same. Anyone know the arr/dep times of the flight during the first go around with the route? A 2:35 arrival can be a little from extreme western European airports but it may be timed to allow for later connections out of PHL.

Arrival time in the schedule shows 2:05 pm local (as opposed to 2:35 above) into PHL which is around the time of a good amount of the European flights, which is easily doable from Ireland. I can't quickly find a schedule from when they ran it a few years back, but I don't recall it being very different.

[Edited 2012-11-05 13:55:02]

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: EIDL
Posted 2012-11-05 14:04:31 and read 1495 times.

Quoting AmricanShamrok (Reply 30):
Well, in 2007 EI were flying 9 A330s across the pond. Today, they are flying 7 as far as I know (St Patrick (EI-ELA), St Aoife, St Ronan, St Maincín, St Mella, St Keeva, St Columba). They offloaded one A330-200 (St Laurence O'Toole) and three A330-300s (St Patrick (EI-DUB), St Brigid, St Maeve) but replaced two of them.

They were doing Dubai during that period - although I assume that only used one a/c.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: usairways85
Posted 2012-11-05 14:08:57 and read 1494 times.

Quoting PHLwok (Reply 37):
Arrival time in the schedule shows 2:05 pm local (as opposed to 2:35 above) into PHL which is around the time of a good amount of the European flights, which is easily doable from Ireland. I can't quickly find a schedule from when they ran it a few years back, but I don't recall it being very different.

Ok, sometimes western European flts can land in the 1130-2pm time frame so I thought maybe this time around they pushed it back a bit to connect with the late afternoon banks mentioned above.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: cipango
Posted 2012-11-05 15:46:37 and read 1482 times.

Quoting mcg (Reply 33):
That seems like a mighty long time to me.

Nothing extreme and certainly not mighty.

Most international flights are on the ground for 2-2 1/2 hours so 3 hours is nothing out of the way.

Now QF in LAX for over 12 Hours is "mighty".

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: usairways85
Posted 2012-11-05 16:40:39 and read 1479 times.

Quoting cipango (Reply 40):
Most international flights are on the ground for 2-2 1/2 hours so 3 hours is nothing out of the way.

Well it is a 752 so I suspect airlines can easily turn a 752 on TA route in 90 min.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: yellowtail
Posted 2012-11-05 17:30:10 and read 1480 times.

Quoting cipango (Reply 40):
Now QF in LAX for over 12 Hours is "mighty".

Well those deep south america..can be much longer than even that.

Topic: RE: US Airways Adds SNN
Username: USAirALB
Posted 2012-11-05 17:47:47 and read 1482 times.

I'm willing to bet that we see PHL-MXP resume with the next few years as well.

Here's the 2013 Summer Long Haul lineup for US:

AMS: 1X 752-PHL
BRU: 1X 752-PHL
ATH: 1X 767-PHL
BCN: 1X 332-PHL
DUB: 1X 767-PHL, 1X 752-CLT
FRA: 1X 333-PHL, 1X 333-CLT, 1X 332-PHL, 1X 332-CLT
GLA: 1X 752-PHL
LIS: 1X 752-PHL
LHR: 1X 333-PHL
LGW: 1X 333-CLT
MAD: 1X 332-PHL, 1X 767-CLT
MAN: 1X 333-PHL
MUC: 1X 333-PHL
CDG: 1X 332-PHL, 1X 767-CLT
FCO: 1X 333-PHL, 1X 767-CLT**
SNN: 1X 752-PHL
TLV: 1X 332-PHL
GIG: 1X 767-CLT
GRU: 1X 332-CLT*
VCE: 1X 767-PHL
ZRH: 1X 767-PHL

All in all, that's not too shabby. 18 airports in Europe, not quite as many as UA (UA has 25 I think) or DL, but more than AA.

Interesting notes: CLT-FCO next season is a 767, instead of the usual A333 as it has always been. Also, GRU is supposed to be started by late summer next year with an A332.


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