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Topic: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Fly-K
Posted 2013-09-05 08:33:36 and read 9790 times.

I just realized the fact that most major Latin American airline names are acronyms (Varig, TAM, LAN, LAB, Copa, Taca, Avianca, Viasa etc.) instead of having their home country spelled out as part of the name (e.g. "Air Colombia", "Air Brasil"). Of course there are some exceptions (Ecuatoriana, Cubana, Aerolineas Argentinas). It doesn't seem to be related to language either (Iberia, Spanair, Air Europa, Vueling etc - with TAP being an exception). Any idea why?

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: ItalianFlyer
Posted 2013-09-05 08:55:25 and read 9713 times.

Great question!!

Actually, the majority of those acronyms are spelling out geo-sentric names. AVIANCA ( Aerovías Nacionales de Colombia S.A.) is National Airways of Colombia. TACA was Transportes Aereos del Continente Americano (American Continent Airline Company), COPA (Compañía Panameña de Aviación, S.A.,) is merely Panamian Airline Company. LAN is simply National Airlines and TAM refers to its origins as a commuter based in the city of Marilia. PLUNA was Uruguayan Airlines..etc.

Allot of the carriers were started as state owned enterprises that were extensions of the military. There are several that were started as private enterprises. A few were started in conjunction with North American or European carriers like Pan American or BOAC.

I am sure there will be more good answers. That is just my .02.

[Edited 2013-09-05 08:56:50]

[Edited 2013-09-05 08:59:43]

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Coronado
Posted 2013-09-05 08:58:40 and read 9680 times.

Is that much different from LOT, SAS, KLM?

But yes some of the old historical names for airlines created in the 1920's and 30's in South America did suffer from very long names. There used to be some laws in many of the countries that mandated that the nature of the business or type of corporate form be included in the full corporate name. The old REAL of Brazil stood for Rede Estadual Aerea Limitada, with Varig standing for Viacao Aerea Rio Grande, etc, which let's face it are long and unwieldy so marketing dictated the creation of short form names.

Unless you are Dutch how many can spell out the full name of KLM, correctly?

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Birdwatching
Posted 2013-09-05 09:01:19 and read 9671 times.

I think it's a regional / cultural thing: in South America, a lot of company names (not just in aviation) are acronyms. You'll find lots of companies in South America with 4 to 6 letter names ending in SA (which stands for Sociedad Anonima). VIASA is an exmple, but there are tons of other examples. Many of them also begin with C which usually stands for Compañia (company). Like Chile's largest shipping company, CSAV = Compañia Sud Americana de Vapores. In Mexico you'll see many company names ending in MEX like PEMEX (Petrol) or TELMEX (Telecom). So in general, companies in South America do this a lot more than in Europe or North America. Why, I don't know.

Soren   

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: andrefranca
Posted 2013-09-05 09:04:26 and read 9641 times.

IMHO, I can't say for every brazilian person but using names for companies such as Air Brasil, Brazilian Airlines, Brazilian general motors etc... can sound too "cheesy" and not really appealing!

I believe also, there's some "hidden" inferiority complex when it comes to country names on products service, one example is American Airlines, we know that these days AA service is not that great, but here when people mention "Oh I flew American Airlines" it sounds wooooow a superior product, service and so on, the same applies for African companies, I once heard at GRU someone saying "oh just returned from Luanda on TAAG Angola" and the person reaction was "oh my Gooood you're crazy".

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Fly-K
Posted 2013-09-05 09:18:43 and read 9563 times.

Quoting Coronado (Reply 2):
Is that much different from LOT, SAS, KLM?

Not much different, but there are just less airlines in Europe whose names are acronyms.

Quoting Coronado (Reply 2):
There used to be some laws in many of the countries that mandated that the nature of the business or type of corporate form be included in the full corporate name.

That would explain it.

Quoting andrefranca (Reply 4):
I believe also, there's some "hidden" inferiority complex when it comes to country names on products service

Well, with changing times (and egos in some places...), that should be less of a problem. Come to think of Brazil, I think it's a shame that the colors of the flag have never really been used on an airline livery. I think an Air Brazil in green/yellow/blue could be a much stronger brand than the generic TAM.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: oly720man
Posted 2013-09-05 09:28:04 and read 9517 times.

In Europe some older airlines were abbreviations. Sabena for example is an abbreviation of "Societé Anonyme Belge d'Exploitation de la Navigation Aérienne"

France had a number of airlines beginning with S for Societe - perhaps related to how companies are named, lots of organisations in France seem to be Societes.

e.g. SAGETA, SANA, STAAP, and recently Star Airlines (Societe de Transports Aerien Regional)

There was also UAT, UTA and TAI


And, of course, on the other side of the world there's Qantas.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: KaiGywer
Posted 2013-09-05 09:33:55 and read 9474 times.

Quoting oly720man (Reply 6):
"Societé Anonyme Belge d'Exploitation de la Navigation Aérienne"

I thought it stood for Such A Bloody Experience, Never Again   

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: aznmadsci
Posted 2013-09-05 09:55:48 and read 9373 times.

Don't forget Asia, too: JAL, ANA, and PAL.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: ghost77
Posted 2013-09-05 10:06:47 and read 9320 times.

Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 3):
In Mexico you'll see many company names ending in MEX like PEMEX (Petrol) or TELMEX (Telecom). So in general, companies in South America do this a lot more than in Europe or North America.

Just an observation. Mexico is not in South America or Central America, but in North America:



However, it is in Latin America.

g77

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Tomassjc
Posted 2013-09-05 10:07:46 and read 9320 times.

Quoting ItalianFlyer (Reply 1):
TACA was Transportes Aereos del Continente Americano

And was Transportes Aereos del Centro America before that I believe.

Tomas SJC

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: PacNWJet
Posted 2013-09-05 10:14:53 and read 9273 times.

Quoting oly720man (Reply 6):
In Europe some older airlines were abbreviations.

  

The full name of Spain's defunct domestic airline AVIACO was Aviación y Comercio, S.A.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: aer
Posted 2013-09-05 12:13:49 and read 9026 times.

Also the acronyms other than shortening a long name for example writing Empresa Guatemalteca de Aviacion in an aircraft into Aviateca. That gave brand differentiation.

Many airlines in Latin America had their names start with Servicio Aereo..., Lineas Aereas..., Aerovias... or Aerolineas... to give a few examples. The acronyms also gave the companies their own identities like SAHSA, Nica, Lan Chile, and AeroMexico.

Someone mentioned Ecuatoriana... they fell in the "de Aviación" category with Mexicana and Dominicana in there.

Hope this answers your question a little.

Quoting ghost77 (Reply 9):
However, it is in Latin America.

And yes not everything south of the border is South America.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Reffado
Posted 2013-09-05 15:01:17 and read 8746 times.

Can't speak for other countries, but the fact that at Brazil never had a state owned company, and at the time of foundation of the current carriers, apart from GOL, international market was not in the initial plans. Varig for instance was founded in 1928 as "Viação Aérea Rio Grandense", or rather, Rio Grandense Air Lines, in southern Brazi. It then grew and grew until Cruzeiro and Panair came along. TAM started as a smaller commuter service, "Taxi Aéreo Marília". It has since been renamed "Transportes Aéreos Meridionais". VASP was "Viação Aérea de São Paulo", and so on. Only airline to ever use a proposed "common" name was TransBrasil, and look how that turned out. They had a much shorter run than everyone else, and perhaps that still has an influence on customers.

GOL I believe was named this way in relation to the word "goal", which reminds one of victory, of scoring. This, combined with the decades long reputation of the VW Gol, the most popular car in Brazil (also a transportation method), may have appealed well to the customers in research back in 2001. Not to mention that a short name usually works best in branding, especially in a country such as this where only about 3% of the population has a complete high school course, quite different from the USA, you might say. To prove it, GOL started out right after 9/11, the worst possible timing for a new airline, and now they're quite popular, relatively large airline with a larger domestic fleet than TAM itself, and all of this in just 12 years. Sure, they're bleeding cash, but that isn't stopping them from being a reference in domestic brazilian air travel.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Aeri28
Posted 2013-09-05 15:34:05 and read 8666 times.

Quoting andrefranca (Reply 4):
IMHO, I can't say for every brazilian person but using names for companies such as Air Brasil, Brazilian Airlines, Brazilian general motors etc... can sound too "cheesy" and not really appealing!

So what are you trying to say, Air France, British Airways, American Airlines, Japan Airlines, Air New Zealand all sound cheesy? Those brands are quite strong and well known. I'm not sure anyone would say they are cheesy. Not saying you said that, but your text implies a certain cheesiness with using a country name or nationality with an "airline' tag.

I think it really just is perception, had their been an Argentine International Airlines or Brazilian Airways or Brazilair, you would not think anything of it. Plus "Aerolineas" is a form of Airways/Airlines but in a Spanish sense, so basicially it is sort of an Argentine Airlines. Same with a European airline. If fAir France had been named French Airlines or France Air, we'd think nothing of it, but since we are familiar and used to Air France, to consider it otherwise sounds strange and funny. Anyway, not trying to pick your comments apart.

____


PS
I had a friend years ago who always thought Alitalia was named after a guy : Al Italia. Like Big Al Italy or something lol., I always thought it was Al'Italia like Al Pastor, Al Fresco... Al'Italia. "the italian way"

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-05 15:55:58 and read 8616 times.

Nicaragua had LANICA (an acronym for Líneas Aéreas de Nicaragua), which, following its demise, was followed by AeroNica and Nica Airlines, a TACA subsidiary. Of the three, I liked AeroNica best.

Paraguay's LADESA was definitely an acronym: Lineas Aéreas del Este SA.

Some languages just have easier abbreviations to incorporate into an acronym than others. In Spanish, SA = "sociedad autónoma," which is the equivalent of limited liability joint stock company. In Swedish, it's AB (aktiebolag/et), which gave us SAAB (Svenska Aeroplan AB).

The German equivalent (GmbH) doesn't work so well.  

-Al
YQBexYHZBGM

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: sankaps
Posted 2013-09-05 16:01:49 and read 8585 times.

Quoting aznmadsci (Reply 8):
Don't forget Asia, too: JAL, ANA, and PAL.

JAL is still marketed as Japan Airlines, and PAL as Philippine Airlines. Only ANA would be a good example of the three you name, since they no longer use All Nippon Airlines as their brand name.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: rwy04lga
Posted 2013-09-05 16:05:06 and read 8568 times.

Quoting Coronado (Reply 2):
Unless you are Dutch how many can spell out the full name of KLM, correctly?

Actually...  .
And my pronunciation isn't bad, either.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Viscount724
Posted 2013-09-05 16:08:48 and read 8558 times.

Quoting sankaps (Reply 16):
Quoting aznmadsci (Reply 8):
Don't forget Asia, too: JAL, ANA, and PAL.

JAL is still marketed as Japan Airlines,

When they exited bankruptcy a couple of years ago they changed their name from Japan Air Lines to Japan Airlines.

On that point, what carriers other than Delta and Swiss still use "Air Lines" (2 words) rather than "Airlines"?

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: andrefranca
Posted 2013-09-05 16:15:58 and read 8545 times.

Quoting Aeri28 (Reply 14):
So what are you trying to say, Air France, British Airways, American Airlines, Japan Airlines, Air New Zealand all sound cheesy? Those brands are quite strong and well known. I'm not sure anyone would say they are cheesy. Not saying you said that, but your text implies a certain cheesiness with using a country name or nationality with an "airline' tag.

I mean for us brazilians it sounds cheesy to use brazil or your state name on company names.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-05 16:27:19 and read 8508 times.

Quoting andrefranca (Reply 19):
I mean for us brazilians it sounds cheesy to use brazil or your state name on company names.

Although Embraer did name the EMB-120 "Brasilia."
And, while we're at it, Embraer = Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica  

Al

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: SFJeff
Posted 2013-09-05 16:33:32 and read 8491 times.

Quoting ghost77 (Reply 9):
Just an observation. Mexico is not in South America or Central America, but in North America:

Your map suggests that Central America is not a part of North America. Central America is as much a part of the continent of North America as Canada is. However, it is true that Latin Americans often refer to people from the U.S. as North Americans.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Cubsrule
Posted 2013-09-05 18:13:51 and read 8305 times.

Quoting Coronado (Reply 2):
Is that much different from LOT, SAS, KLM?

Nitpick: LOT is not an acronym but rather an abbreviation (for Linie Lotnicze, which means airline). SAS and KLM are acronyms.

Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 3):
Many of them also begin with C which usually stands for Compañia (company). Like Chile's largest shipping company, CSAV = Compañia Sud Americana de Vapores.

Yup - Copec (Chilean oil company) and Codelco (Chilean state copper company) are other good examples. That's where a lot of the LA- names in Spanish come from (Lineas Aereas or Linea Aerea). Ladeco -- Linea Aerea del Cobre -- sort of combines both.

I don't speak much Portuguese, but I think Embraer -- Empresa Brasileria de Aeronautica -- is similar.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-05 18:23:09 and read 8230 times.

SABENA = Société autonome belge d'expoloitation de la navigation aérienne

The French SA abbreviation is used to some degree in France, Belgium and Switzerland, but I've rarely seen it in Québec. "et cie." (et compagnie), "ltée." (limited liability company) are also seen, but "inc." is becoming universal.

I'm trying to think if there are any airlines in African francophone countries that are acronyms or abbreviations similar to those prevalent in Latin America, but I can't think of any offhand.

-Al
YQBexYHZBGM

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-05 18:37:23 and read 8092 times.

Unless they can be pronounced as words, they are not acronyms, they are abbreviations. The best example of acronym I can think of is the BASIC computer language = beginner's all-purpose symbolic instruction code.

So, SAS is not really an acronym, since it is always pronounced "S-A-S" rather than "sass." The company's full name has always been in English: Scandinavian Airlines System Group AB (aktiebolag). Same story with EVA Air, which is always pronounced "E-V-A" rather than "Eva." (They couldn't call it Evergreen Air because Evergreen International is a U.S. based cargo airline, which has no relation to EVA).

SATA, the airline of the Azores, is an acronym for Serviços e Transportes Aéreos.

-Al

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: RCS763AV
Posted 2013-09-05 18:40:09 and read 8345 times.

The acronyms have changed too, reflecting the now multinational airlines in the continent.

LAN is Latin Airline Network, changed from Línea Aérea Nacional.
Avianca is Aerovías del Continente Americano, changed from Aerovías Nacionales de Colombia.

I don't know, but I like the acronyms. Varig, Avianca, LAN, Viasa sound more appealing than just "Air___" or "___ Airlines" to me. Brand recognition also has a key role here.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-05 19:31:15 and read 7946 times.

A couple more:

LACSA = Líneas Aéreas Costarricenses S.A. (Costa Rica, now part of Grupo TACA)
AVIACSA = Aviación de Chiapas S.A. (defunct Mexican carrier)
TAESA = Transportes Aéreos Ejecutivos (defunct early Mexican LCC)
ACES = Aerolíneas Centrales de Colombia (defunct Colombian carrier)
AIRES = Aerovías de Integración Regional S.A. (Colombian carrier, now LAN Colombia)
SATENA = Servicio Aéreo a Territorios Nacionales (a Colombian government-operated carrier)

Of these, AIRES is the best true acronym, since it is also a word meaning "air" (plural) in Spanish.

-Al

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: ha763
Posted 2013-09-05 19:40:24 and read 7996 times.

Quoting sankaps (Reply 16):
JAL is still marketed as Japan Airlines

Japan Airlines is a mixed bag, but extensively uses the JAL brand for marketing.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 18):
When they exited bankruptcy a couple of years ago they changed their name from Japan Air Lines to Japan Airlines.

Japan Airlines has not been Japan Air Lines for decades. The visible change happened in the late 1980's when JAL changed their livery. In the picture below, you can see that it has "Airlines" as one word.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Peter de Groot

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: AR385
Posted 2013-09-05 20:09:28 and read 7812 times.

Quoting YQBexYHZBGM (Reply 15):
Nicaragua had LANICA (an acronym for Líneas Aéreas de Nicaragua), which, following its demise, was followed by AeroNica and Nica Airlines, a TACA subsidiary. Of the three, I liked AeroNica best.

The running joke in Nicaragua at the time, particularly in Managua (talk about a badly picked acronym) was that they were the "flying commode" as " La nica" is the commode some people put near their beds at night. It would be "La Bacinica" but in Nicaragua it was shortened to "La nica" and then somebody comes and names an airline LANICA. You gotta wonder wether they were foreigners or what.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-05 20:29:42 and read 7628 times.

Quoting AR385 (Reply 28):
The running joke in Nicaragua at the time, particularly in Managua (talk about a badly picked acronym) was that they were the "flying commode" as " La nica" is the commode some people put near their beds at night. It would be "La Bacinica" but in Nicaragua it was shortened to "La nica" and then somebody comes and names an airline LANICA. You gotta wonder wether they were foreigners or what.

LOL, thank you AR385, I will have to remember that for my next trip to MGA!  

-Al

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: MtnWest1979
Posted 2013-09-05 20:43:24 and read 7565 times.

[

Quoting Cubsrule (Reply 22):
Nitpick: LOT is not an acronym but rather an abbreviation (for Linie Lotnicze, which means airline). SAS and KLM are acronyms.

Actually, SAS and KLM are also not acronyms. An acronym is an abbreviation that is said as a word, such as QANTAS (before it became the actual trade name), PANAGRA, VARIG etc. Saying S A S and K L M is just saying the letters.

Anyway, just a vent on my part. Have a good day.

https://www.google.com/webhp?source=search_app#q=acronym+definition&safe=off

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: ecbomberman
Posted 2013-09-05 22:14:53 and read 7024 times.

Names of Airline too loooooonngggggg

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Aeri28
Posted 2013-09-06 00:29:47 and read 6377 times.

Did anybody mention the old : UTA French Airlines?

I've seen the french version use : UTA Compagnie Aerienne Francaise (not doing the accents sorry), but UTA also stood for "Union de Transports Aeriens" (there may be a type, not at home at the moment), so it would seem awfully large to have it "Union de Transports Aeriens: Compagnie Aerienne Francaise.

= UTA French Airlines

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: sankaps
Posted 2013-09-06 00:40:52 and read 6308 times.

Quoting YQBexYHZBGM (Reply 24):
Same story with EVA Air, which is always pronounced "E-V-A" rather than "Eva." (They couldn't call it Evergreen Air because Evergreen International is a U.S. based cargo airline, which has no relation to EVA).

I have always heard it pronounced as Eva Air. I think even airport announcements in Asia say Eva Air.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: larshjort
Posted 2013-09-06 01:49:05 and read 6028 times.

Quoting MtnWest1979 (Reply 30):
Actually, SAS and KLM are also not acronyms. An acronym is an abbreviation that is said as a word, such as QANTAS (before it became the actual trade name), PANAGRA, VARIG etc. Saying S A S and K L M is just saying the letters.

Most danes, norwegians and swedes I know pronounce SAS as SAS not S-A-S. So SAS is both an acrnym and an abbreviation.

/Lars

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: ERJ135
Posted 2013-09-06 02:04:06 and read 5971 times.

Quoting MtnWest1979 (Reply 30):
Actually, SAS and KLM are also not acronyms.

For the Dutch however KLM is said as a word and is pronounced "Khalem" so for them it is an acronym.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: DexSwart
Posted 2013-09-06 02:36:59 and read 5805 times.

SA still operates under SAA and used to operate under SAL (Suid-Afrikaanse Lugdiens)

SAL is still used among Afrikaans speakers, like myself. It's easier to say than "South African Airways"

Also, coming off of that, pronouncing English names or words in another language can become very confusing very quickly. At least messy.

In Afrikaans, we roll our "R's", and to stop the flow of speaking, by saying "South African Airways" would not only sound funny, but slow the conversation down.



Another thing that could be important to note is that many people see those names as names, not acronyms or abbreviations.

Take "Qantas" for example.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: PATRistar
Posted 2013-09-06 05:01:06 and read 5115 times.

In my opinion is a marketing issue, is prefered to be TAM then Transportes Aereos Marilia, for international expansion is easier and more international to use acronyms specially if the airline doesn't belong to a english speaking country.

Like TAP, TAAG, al from portuguese speaking locations. Nevetherless we had companies wihtout acronyms but they didn't make it like Transbrasil, Air Brasil, Real, Panair, Nacional.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: airbazar
Posted 2013-09-06 07:05:07 and read 4390 times.

Quoting Fly-K (Thread starter):
I just realized the fact that most major Latin American airline names are acronyms

It's out of convenience due to the language and their legacy as state run airlines. Why do we use CBP or TSA? The government likes big names   Romance languages are very formal and as a result names tend to be extra long. My father's full name is 6 names long and that's almost normal. In the Anglo world, you'll be hard pressed to find someone with more than 3 names and in a lot of cases they still find the need to abbreviate it due to the informality of the language.

Other airlines known as their abbreviation are TAP, UTA, TAROM.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: AirbusA6
Posted 2013-09-06 07:28:22 and read 4246 times.

But then the predecessors to British Airways (BA) were BOAC and BEA, which were generally referred to by their intials rather than their full name. "Flew in from Miami Beach BOAC, may I had a dreadful flight..."

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-06 07:33:55 and read 4212 times.

Quoting AirbusA6 (Reply 39):
But then the predecessors to British Airways (BA) were BOAC and BEA, which were generally referred to by their intials rather than their full name. "Flew in from Miami Beach BOAC, may I had a dreadful flight..."

And BWIA! I've heard that some people used to call them "Bee Wee" rather than B-W-I-A. I remember their radio commercials, though, which had the musical slogan, "Fly away, fly away, fly away on B-W-I-A."

Used to love seeing their gold L10s with the multicolor tail logo on approach to JFK.

-Al YQBexYHZBGM

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: PacNWJet
Posted 2013-09-06 08:28:50 and read 3873 times.

Quoting YQBexYHZBGM (Reply 40):
And BWIA! I've heard that some people used to call them "Bee Wee" rather than B-W-I-A.

  

Sort of like TWA in Spain. The letter "W" is not part of the traditional Spanish alphabet. When imported in from foreign languages "W" is referred to as "double v" which in Spanish is long to say. When I lived in Spain most people I know referred to TWA not as "T-W-A" (three letters in succession) but rather as "La Túa" which in English would sound like "lah tooah." I'm not sure if this was common elsewhere in the Spanish-speaking world.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Coronado
Posted 2013-09-06 08:36:53 and read 3792 times.

Real (Redes Estaduais Aéreas Limitadas) Transportes Aéreos

Quoting PATRistar (Reply 37):
Nevetherless we had companies wihtout acronyms but they didn't make it like Transbrasil, Air Brasil, Real, Panair, Nacional

Real (Redes Estaduais Aéreas Limitadas) Transportes Aéreos , actually it was created as an acronym, and then subsequently reregistered as REAL AEROVIAS, if I recall correctly.

The first flight I remember was in July 1958 on a Super H Constellation leaving from Cumbica air base actually ending up at Chicago Midway-which they served for a very few short months before cutting back and terminating that route in Miami.

My dad later told me that CGH's main runway was closed for resurfacing so they were using a smaller auxiliary run way which was not adequate for the Constellations. Later I read that it was probably due to political difficulties between the managing director of REAL, Linneu Gomes and the powers that ran Panair do Brasil

I remember walking down the path bordered by white painted stones (Cumbica was a military base so the old story that if it moves salute it, if it doesn't move paint it) down a slight hill to see the Constellation doing engine run ups with an absolutely incredible amount of smoke. Flew up to the USA but took a ship back so that was my only experience with REAL which by 1961 was gone and merged into VARIG. But it certainly served to keep me interested in commercial aviation ever since.

I remember that my family being from Santos knew one of the two co-founders of REAL (the other being G, Vicente Mammana Neto, who was a pilot from Santos. Base Aerea de Cumbica of course later on become part of the Sao Paulo Guarulhos footprint.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: andrefranca
Posted 2013-09-06 09:03:29 and read 3729 times.

Quoting YQBexYHZBGM (Reply 20):
Although Embraer did name the EMB-120 "Brasilia."
And, while we're at it, Embraer = Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica  

Al

I know but to tell you the truth, many many people here don't know Embraer stands for that because Embraer doesn't really sound brazilian slang, word or whatsoever, most of them can't even recognize the Embraer made planes.

Quoting PATRistar (Reply 37):
Nevetherless we had companies wihtout acronyms but they didn't make it like Transbrasil, Air Brasil, Real, Panair, Nacional.

  

here in MAO we had TABA - Transporte Aéreo da Bacia Amazônica, it was once a major amazonian airlines.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: RJNUT
Posted 2013-09-06 09:27:04 and read 3684 times.

here is a list of Latin airlines i remember from the past/present

Aviacsa -MExico
TACA- El Salvador
Aviateca - Guatemala
TAN -HOnduras
Sahsa _honduras
TACA EL Salvador
Lanica - Nicaragua
Aeronica -NIcaragua
Lacsa _COsta RIca
COPA -_Panama
Avianca COlumbia
TAME Ecuador
Saesa -Ecuador
APSA -Peru (COnvair 990's in the 1970's)
Ladeco -Chile (literally means Copper AIrlines
LAN -chile
LAB -Bolivia
LADE -Argentina
LAP -Paraguay (lineas areas paraguayas, but some said peligrosas!_)

i'LL Skip the Brazilian

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: n729pa
Posted 2013-09-06 10:12:53 and read 3602 times.

It's a lot easy to answer the phone as Varig than the full name I would imagine!

Don't forget Qantas ......


Sabena - Societé Anonyme Belge d'Exploitation de la Navigation Aérienne
Malev -- Magyar Légiközlekedési Vállalat

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YLWbased
Posted 2013-09-06 10:39:52 and read 3553 times.

Probably becoz it will be easier for non-native speaker to pronounce their name?

Honestly, who on earth can properly pronounce "Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij" ?

btw, EVA is short form of Evergreen Airways*

YLWbased

[Edited 2013-09-06 10:43:26]

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: LFutia
Posted 2013-09-06 10:47:53 and read 3539 times.

Quoting YLWbased (Reply 46):
Honestly, who on earth can properly pronounce "Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij" ?

Cone in-clickah Lookt-fart Maat (long a) ska (long a) pie.

Leo/ORD

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: YQBexYHZBGM
Posted 2013-09-06 12:37:25 and read 3423 times.

LAB = Lloyd Aero Boliviano

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: PPVRA
Posted 2013-09-06 17:28:52 and read 3267 times.

Quoting ItalianFlyer (Reply 1):
Allot of the carriers were started as state owned enterprises that were extensions of the military. There are several that were started as private enterprises. A few were started in conjunction with North American or European carriers like Pan American or BOAC.
Quoting Birdwatching (Reply 3):
I think it's a regional / cultural thing: in South America, a lot of company names (not just in aviation) are acronyms. You'll find lots of companies in South America with 4 to 6 letter names ending in SA (which stands for Sociedad Anonima). VIASA is an exmple, but there are tons of other examples. Many of them also begin with C which usually stands for Compañia (company). Like Chile's largest shipping company, CSAV = Compañia Sud Americana de Vapores. In Mexico you'll see many company names ending in MEX like PEMEX (Petrol) or TELMEX (Telecom). So in general, companies in South America do this a lot more than in Europe or North America. Why, I don't know.

In Brazil, only VASP was government-owned for a while. But as indicated above, many other non-airline companies were indeed government owned and they generally all had/have generic/nationalistic acronyms for names (this is a common trend on all government-owned companies worldwide). I think given the extensive involvement of the state in the Latin American market, both historically and to this day, some of it rubbed off on a lot of other private sector companies.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Viscount724
Posted 2013-09-06 17:35:55 and read 3269 times.

Quoting sankaps (Reply 33):
Quoting YQBexYHZBGM (Reply 24):
Same story with EVA Air, which is always pronounced "E-V-A" rather than "Eva." (They couldn't call it Evergreen Air because Evergreen International is a U.S. based cargo airline, which has no relation to EVA).

I have always heard it pronounced as Eva Air. I think even airport announcements in Asia say Eva Air.

Not my experience. Always E-V-A, like TWA.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: AirGabon
Posted 2013-09-09 07:35:45 and read 2726 times.

Also we had in France AOM: Air Outre Mer, which means Overseas Territories Airline.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Confuscius
Posted 2013-09-09 08:01:03 and read 2683 times.

Quoting Coronado (Reply 2):
how many can spell out the full name of KLM, correctly?

Royal Dutch Airlines

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: sankaps
Posted 2013-09-09 08:06:37 and read 2674 times.

Quoting Confuscius (Reply 52):
Quoting Coronado (Reply 2):how many can spell out the full name of KLM, correctly?

Royal Dutch Airlines

Nope. Literal translation is Royal Aviation Company.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: VC10er
Posted 2013-09-09 19:55:10 and read 2449 times.

Quoting Fly-K (Reply 5):

When LANDOR did the big 1999 rebrand of VARIG, we intentionally used blue and yellow. We turned the old dusty blue and black compass into a sun compass and added the Brasil script (where the "s" in Brasil also had the essence of a "z")

The goal was to not rock the world with an innovative breakthrough identity and livery, it was to represent VARIG as the ambassador of Brasil to the world, and to look at par with the world-class majors. Which IMHO our SF office did!

Too bad it was managed out of the skies. VARIG (e) was an awesome airline in its day. And Brazilians were extremely proud of VARIG at one time.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: bobnwa
Posted 2013-09-10 04:26:53 and read 2267 times.

Quoting ghost77 (Reply 9):
However, it is in Latin America.

Do you define Latin America as any country using Spanish as its main language excluding Brazil?

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Fly-K
Posted 2013-09-10 05:23:16 and read 2206 times.

Quoting AirGabon (Reply 51):
Also we had in France AOM: Air Outre Mer, which means Overseas Territories Airline

Or more literally, Air Overseas.

Quoting VC10er (Reply 54):
The goal was to not rock the world with an innovative breakthrough identity and livery, it was to represent VARIG as the ambassador of Brasil to the world, and to look at par with the world-class majors

That is true, the rebranding was classy and had more subtle hints at a Brazilian identity than the previous livery.

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: ghost77
Posted 2013-09-10 08:31:29 and read 2068 times.

Quoting bobnwa (Reply 55):
Do you define Latin America as any country using Spanish as its main language excluding Brazil?


No. This is Latin America according most Latin Americans:



G77

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: Viscount724
Posted 2013-09-10 12:46:15 and read 1962 times.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 50):
Quoting sankaps (Reply 33):
Quoting YQBexYHZBGM (Reply 24):
Same story with EVA Air, which is always pronounced "E-V-A" rather than "Eva." (They couldn't call it Evergreen Air because Evergreen International is a U.S. based cargo airline, which has no relation to EVA).

I have always heard it pronounced as Eva Air. I think even airport announcements in Asia say Eva Air.

Not my experience. Always E-V-A, like TWA.

Coincidentally, there was interview of EVA's CEO yesterday on CNBC Europe. Every reference to the airline by both the CEO and the interviewer used E-V-A, not "Eva".

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: sankaps
Posted 2013-09-10 12:48:04 and read 1959 times.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 58):
Every reference to the airline by both the CEO and the interviewer used E-V-A, not "Eva".

Well, in that case I stand corrected... will need to listen more carefully the next time I am in Asia!

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: bobnwa
Posted 2013-09-10 13:04:23 and read 1932 times.

Quoting ghost77 (Reply 57):
No. This is Latin America according most Latin Americans:

I see on the map which countries are included, but what defines a latin american country in the minds of most Latin Americans?

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: sankaps
Posted 2013-09-10 13:11:10 and read 1922 times.

Quoting bobnwa (Reply 60):
I see on the map which countries are included, but what defines a latin american country in the minds of most Latin Americans?

I would guess it describes countries that were once colonies of Spain or Portugal? Or in other words, the set of countries in the Americas where a Romance language is the primary language?

Topic: RE: Why Are Most South American Airline Names Acronyms
Username: PDPsol
Posted 2013-09-10 13:22:47 and read 1909 times.

Quoting bobnwa (Reply 60):
I see on the map which countries are included, but what defines a latin american country in the minds of most Latin Americans?
Quoting sankaps (Reply 61):
I would guess it describes countries that were once colonies of Spain or Portugal? Or in other words, the set of countries in the Americas where a Romance language is the primary language?

Indeed, former colonies of France, where French is still spoken, are also considered part of Latin America by many. Haiti in the Caribbean, Fr. Guyana and French Caribbean territories [included in the map]. While Quebec is also a former French colony, the province is part of a predominately English-speaking nation, Canada. Quebec also has a large English-speaking population.

Brazil has always been and will always be Latin American.


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