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Topic: The BAe 146 And Avro RJ - Why 4 Engines, Not 2?
Username: Boeing 777
Posted 2000-01-30 20:09:04 and read 3007 times.

Why is it that these British-made RJs have four engines, where only two will do? British Aerospace had considered developing a two engined version in the past, but Avro decided to stick with the four engines. Mind you, this is the ONLY 4-engined RJ on the market!

But they're not too loud and are quite stable in flight. I've flown on them several times on AirBC and Air Nova.

Note: The Avro RJ is just a new version of the BAe 146.

Topic: RE: The BAe 146 And Avro RJ - Why 4 Engines, Not 2?
Username: Kaitak
Posted 2000-01-30 20:29:51 and read 2904 times.

The comedian inside me is bursting to get out. I do think Quadropuff sounds a lot better than bi-puff. The thing can barely get going with four engines; with two, they could just saw off the wings and use it as a city bus.

It's often described by pilots as the only aircraft with 5 APUs.

Topic: RE: The BAe 146 And Avro RJ - Why 4 Engines, Not 2?
Username: Lauda 777
Posted 2000-01-30 22:03:27 and read 2892 times.

It´s is becuse the aircraft is got to be very silent....

Topic: RE: The BAe 146 And Avro RJ - Why 4 Engines, Not 2?
Username: AC_A340
Posted 2000-01-30 22:31:43 and read 2886 times.

The best reason I've ever heard was that its because it spends a lot of time at samller airports without heavy maitenance facilities. This way, if one engine has problems on the ground, it can be flown to a larger airport without any passengers with only 3 engines. This is a lot cheaper then flying in the part(s) and people to fix it.

Topic: RE: The BAe 146 And Avro RJ - Why 4 Engines, Not 2?
Username: Skylinepigeon
Posted 2000-01-30 23:36:30 and read 2873 times.

The design started as the Hawker Siddeley (HS) 146 in the 1970s. At that time I believe there was not an engine available that would have had the required thrust and noise characteristics to allow a two engined configuration. Also the selection of American (Avco Lycoming) engines probably helped sell it to early American customers such as Air Wisconsin and PSA. I believe the wings used to be built in the US too. Redesigning and re-certifying the aircraft as a twin in later life would presumably have been too expensive.

Topic: RE: The BAe 146 And Avro RJ - Why 4 Engines, Not 2?
Username: Timz
Posted 2000-01-31 00:17:33 and read 2872 times.

Supposedly runway performance was a factor-- for a given total weight and total thrust the 4-engine aircraft can legally use a shorter runway.


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