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Airlines To Check Weights Of Pax Before Boarding  
User currently offlineJCS17 From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 8065 posts, RR: 39
Posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 3426 times:

http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/3617321.html

Note: This only covers 10-19 seaters.

I could care less about stepping on a scale before boarding. I'm sure the only people that wont be happy about this are the same people that require seat belt extenders! Big grin


America's chickens are coming home to rooooost!
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFlyingTexan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week ago) and read 3290 times:

Following are some excerpts as published in the AP article that appeared in the Minneapolis St. Paul Star Tribune (see link above).


Debby McElroy, president of the Regional Airlines Association, which is working with the FAA, said airlines are being asked to weigh passengers and bags over three days within the next month at about a third of the airports used by aircraft carrying 10 to 19 passengers.

The survey will affect passengers on about 200 Jetstream 31s, Metro 23s and Beech 1900s, McElroy said.

All bags will be weighed, but the FAA is letting the airlines decide whether they'll require passengers to step on scales or simply ask them how much they weigh.

The agency will allow airlines to add 10 pounds to each passenger because some people may underestimate their weight.

Passengers who refuse to divulge their weight can be barred from the flight, the FAA said.


Any guess on how long until the ACLU files a complaint and/or suit?


User currently offlineElwood64151 From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 2477 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3223 times:

It doesn't matter. The airline reserves the right to refuse transport for safety reasons. I've had to unload peoples bags from a flight because the plane could make it with passengers, but not with half their bags. We sent them on the next plane. The pax weren't happy, but they each got $25 for their trouble if their bag didn't make it.

If the pax doesn't want to step on the scale or tell the airline their weight, then too darn bad. We're talking about safety, here, not self-image. Their right to self expression and/or privacy ends with my (and your) safety.

They don't want to do it, they can take the train.



Those who fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it in summer school.
User currently offlineBuckfifty From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 1316 posts, RR: 20
Reply 3, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3217 times:

I wonder if they're going to calculate out a new std. pax weight for the smaller acft...

User currently offlineTeva From France, joined Jan 2001, 1871 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3174 times:

Another bad news for Mc Donalds....  Big thumbs up

Teva



Ecoute les orgues, Elles jouent pour toi...C'est le requiem pour un con
User currently offlineN949WP From Hong Kong, joined Feb 2000, 1437 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 3157 times:

Perhaps in consideration of the passengers privacy, they can use scales that indicate various "zones" instead of actual weight. Then, use standard pax weight for the lowest zone, and add increments for every zone above.

'949


User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13194 posts, RR: 77
Reply 6, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3103 times:

More on this 'weighty' story here;
http://www.guardian.co.uk/airlines/story/0,1371,884466,00.html


User currently offlineBobcat From United States of America, joined Jun 2007, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 3070 times:

According to the medical journals, more than 60% of
American adults are overweight. Half of them are women.
How many women will be willing to stand on a scale
before they get on a plane?

What will this really mean for the airlines?(financially, that is)

Just a thought...  Smile



User currently offlineFlyingTexan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days ago) and read 3002 times:

Elwood64151 is correct!!!

The airline reserves the right to refuse transport for safety reasons.



User currently offlineBsergonomics From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2002, 462 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (11 years 7 months 6 days ago) and read 2981 times:

A slightly more scientific approach...

We (the scientific community) have tables with ranges of data for all sorts of body measurements, including body weight. These are measured in 'percentiles', where 0% is the smallest and 100% is the largest. Humans range enormously in all aspects. So, to give usable data, we use specific data ranges. For example, aircraft cockpits used to be designed for people in the height range of 5th to 95th percentile. Nowadays it tends to be for people in the range from 3rd or 5th percentile female to 95th or 97th percentile male. This can give you a height range from 5'0 to 6'4 (this also depends on which population you are using).

However, humans in general are getting taller. Meanwhile, those in developed countries are also getting wider. It is not surprising, therefore, that we are getting heavier. Essentially, this is a pilot study to see if a wider survey is required to check to see if the amount of growth is sufficient to warrant a wider scale measurement exercise. If the percentage growth is more than a certain amount (to be decided by the FAA/JAA), then the average weight of a passenger will be increased when calculating total passenger weight and weight & balance calculations.

Hope this helps.



The definition of a 'Pessimist': an Optimist with experience...
User currently offlineAA61hvy From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 13977 posts, RR: 57
Reply 10, posted (11 years 7 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2966 times:

Average adult is 185 with bags? Man I'm 210 with out bags, with bags I'm like 240.


Go big or go home
User currently offlineRedngold From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 6907 posts, RR: 44
Reply 11, posted (11 years 7 months 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 2958 times:

...any passengers found to be of excess weight will automatically be tagged to "FAT"

*giggle* That would be me...

redngold



Up, up and away!
User currently offlineFlyingTexan From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (11 years 7 months 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 2933 times:

OMG – Redngold, hilarious you mention ‘FAT’ as a tag.

Fresno, right?

One time at AA, my co-worker took a call at the res center as the supervisor on duty. A Fresno passenger was calling to complain that her bag tag was degrading and was upset that AA ridicule her.

JR FlyingTexan

(Good thing she was not flying to FUK in Japan)


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