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A380, What's The Real Breakthrough?  
User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9708 posts, RR: 11
Posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 3947 times:

I was talking with a friend about the A380 and we were discussing the breakthroughs of this new aircraft and whether the A380 will become a new milestone in the aviation industry. All I've read about the A380 so far is the new cockpit concept using laptops and new navigational systems using real-time information. I read that the Boeing 747-400ER also has a new radar using scans (Rockwell Collin's WXR-2100 Multiscan radar). Regarding the composite material, a new composite designed in the Netherlands and called Glare will also be used in the aviation industry for the first time. With the A380 being the first double decker, from the front to the end of the fuselage also is something new.

So my question is what are the breakthroughs in the A380. For example, I don't know much about the technology used in the engines.

Let's not start an A vs. B war, I'm just interested in what the new features in the A380 will be.

A388

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGreg From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3884 times:

The A380 is not a revolutionary product. It wasn't designed to be. It will use the most of existing technologies--and push into some areas, primarily composites, where no commerical aircraft has gone before.

Fully, 11-12% of the seat mile cost savings are simply from the increase in capacity--and this is according to Airbus. Only 5% of the savings are from new techologies and improvements in aerodynamics, manufaturing, etc. (although that is still significant when added up). All in all, it still makes an attractive package provided capacity and demand are equal.

I think it's greatest battle will be empty weight.

The only oddity I read about is that there is an artificial centre of gravity maintained while flying. I don't understand the concept or the repercussions..possibly someone can enlighten me?





User currently offlineLHMark From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 7255 posts, RR: 47
Reply 2, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3850 times:

Can't they alter the center of gravity by transferring fuel from tank to tank?


"Sympathy is something that shouldn't be bestowed on the Yankees. Apparently it angers them." - Bob Feller
User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 3, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3821 times:

The A330 and A340 modify their CoG in this fashion. There are fuel savings related to it, but I don't understand how that works exactly.

The A320 series has a guide for loading of baggage in what I think are its three compartments, for the same CoG distribution.

N


User currently offlineAvObserver From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 2467 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3784 times:

I think the A380 is more of an evolutionary, rather than revolutionary product. While it does push the materials state of the art, it's capacity increase over the 747 is not a really huge leap. It's a lot less of a jump than going from the 707 to the 747 was. The architecture is largely scaled up A340-a good thing, since most Airbus products have been based in some way on past successes. It's smart that they're taking a relatively conservative approach in designing their new superjumbo, this maximizes its' chances of success while minimizing technical risks, which are still significant, given the unprecedented scale of the project.

User currently offlineLHMark From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 7255 posts, RR: 47
Reply 5, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3807 times:

CoG is vital to keeping aircraft in flight. A shift in CoG can cause a crash.


"Sympathy is something that shouldn't be bestowed on the Yankees. Apparently it angers them." - Bob Feller
User currently offlineGreg From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3773 times:

I understand the concept of Center of Gravity. What I don't understand is why the nature of the A380 is be artificially stablized through the flight regime.
I wasn't speaking specifically of fuel transfer, etc....

This would mean to me that the design..without interaction from trim controls, etc. would be inherently unstable (which may be too strong a word).





User currently offlineBrons2 From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3007 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3736 times:

Considering all the newer Airbuses are FBW, some inherent instability might not be so bad, because it can be controlled through software....


Firings, if well done, are good for employee morale.
User currently offlineKlaus From Germany, joined Jul 2001, 21406 posts, RR: 54
Reply 8, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3611 times:

The Airbus CG control system was discussed in the Tech/Ops forum a while ago:

http://www.airliners.net/discussions/tech_ops/read.main/55464/

Apparently, it helps saving a little fuel (about 2.5%) by shifting fuel to and from a tail tank. Achieving the same effect by using elevator trim would increase drag. And shifting the CG (slightly!) reduces the required elevator trim and therefore drag.

The shift is small enough to keep the aircraft within the inherently stable envelope, obviously.


User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 9, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3605 times:

I consider the extensive use of Glare a pretty big breakthrough, although not a revolutionary one in general.

While glare is a revolutionary material in and of itself - stronger and more resilient than either carbon fiber or aluminum alone, easily repairable, even self healing to an extent, and almost impossible to delaminate - it certainly isn't Airbus' revolution but the scientists who developed it.

I'd be surprised if our new pet the 7E7 didn't incorporate Glare or a similar material as well, although I am not aware of a material that meets the high standard Glare sets.

I assume Airbus does the same kind of stress tests that Boeing does... I can't wait to see the results.

N


User currently offlineAirsicknessbag From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 4723 posts, RR: 34
Reply 10, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 3474 times:

It´s all about the size. The A380 will continue the tradition of 707 and 747 - both had twice the capacity of their respective biggest contemporary - just like the 380.

Daniel Smile


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