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110v Outlet On 747s, True Or Not?  
User currently offlineScutfarcus From United States of America, joined May 2000, 405 posts, RR: 1
Posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 3567 times:



Quoted from "www.laptoptravel.com"

"On long trans-Pacific flights, request a seat at an exit. Not only do you get more leg room, there is, believe it or not, a hot 110 Volt/AC outlet right in front of each exit door in the outside wall of Boeing 747s where you can plug in your notebook's A/C adapter and work/play the hours away without worrying about batteries"

Is this true? I've never noticed. If so, is it ok to just plug in and use it? I presume in the future this sort of thing will become more common, especially in business class, but it's great to know it might already exist on some planes. Anyone know of other secret outlets that may or may not exist on other models?

13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 3537 times:

The sockets by each door are used by cleaners to power their vacuums to clean the aircraft during transits. They were not put there for laptop use, and as they are by the main doors, they are not really accessible by passengers.


Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineShlomoz From Israel, joined Jun 2000, 95 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 3435 times:

I have seen people charge laptops through these outlets.

Plus, on LY 744's there is a 110v outlet at EVERY Platinum (Business) Class seat. The LY 777's have the more "standard" "empower" ports. (I think that's what they are called.



User currently offline242 From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 498 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 3399 times:

Most aircraft have these outlets in one place or another (727,737,757,767,DC9,MD80,717,etc...).

Keep in mind they're 110 volt, 400 hertz, as opposed to 60 hertz.

I'm not really sure what, if any, effect the frequency difference will have on equipment designed for 60 Hz.


User currently offlineKanebear From United States of America, joined May 2002, 953 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3319 times:

Rather nasty, I'm afraid... running 60Hz equipment at 400Hz will definitely destroy it.

User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4575 posts, RR: 41
Reply 5, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3296 times:

I seem to recall there being a power outlet next to door 1A on the thai 747-300 I was on late last year. I think it was marked "Medical Equipment Power Supply". I could be wrong though.

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineBen88 From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 1093 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 3276 times:

Blocking an emergency exit with a cord sounds like a really smart thing to do.

User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 3272 times:

Ben88

You're so correct - don't bloc the door, as I mentioned in my previous message

As a matter of interest the sockets were on all the 707s I flew on as BOAC crew in the early 60s.

I would not be at all happy if some computer nerd blocked one of the main exits of my aircraft - especially with such lethal stuff as non-forgiving cables!



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineLeezyjet From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2001, 4042 posts, RR: 53
Reply 8, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 3178 times:

It's ok to have your handbaggage and other junk (blankets/pillows etc)by the exits during the cruise, so I'm sure that having the cable out wouldn't be a problem providing you asked the crew beforehand.

It's not possible to open the doors inflight so in the event of an emergency there would be time to clear the exits before they needed to be used, and if it was an extreme emergency then chances are you wouldn't be needing the exits anyway.

 Smile



"She Rolls, 45 knots, 90, 135, nose comes up to 20 degrees, she's airborne - She flies, Concorde Flies"
User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3151 times:

As you describe yourself as a dispatcher, I'm surprised you'd make comment condoning about all sorts of things around aircraft doors. I would not want to on one of your dispatched flights!

Aircraft doors are by definition emergency exits, and as such they should always be kept clear, just in case of such an emergency, which often do happen without any warning!

I was cabin crew on BA900/3JAN64, G-APFB, a 707-436, when we had a fire on one engine taking off from DEL in the middle of the night. The aircraft engine extinguishers did not put out the flames, but the airflow did the job in the end - it was not a pleasant experience. Needless to say on my aircraft there was absolutely no garbage around any of the exits!

Not sure if you dispatch 747s, but their doors can open in flight, but only just the first inbound few inches of the normal opening. They can be operated in flight in some cases of fire on board to help disperse smoke, etc!



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineN777UA From United States of America, joined Mar 2010, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 3102 times:

As long as the exit is kept well clear whenever the aircraft is anywhere but cruse flight, I see no reason why the cord would be a problem, as if there is a problem, it can be retrieved quickly.

User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 11, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 3087 times:

If you haven't worked it out yet, trailling cables are LETHAL which means they can kill if left in an exposed position - keep yourself off any aircraft carrying sensible passengers!

I once broke my left leg in five places, as I was disembarking, when some IDIOT had not stowed some safety webbing (like car seat belt material) at the end of an aircraft jetty - the carrier paid me several thousand pounds in compensation, but that doesn't really help when you're off work for six months!

Keep away from emergency exits with garbage!

As mentioned before, the sockets are there SOLELY for the cleaners!



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineAriegel From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 107 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 3038 times:

Carduelis,

You bring up a good question.. I've always wondered when flying long distances if the emergency doors actually COULD be opened in flight.. I mean, with the big red handle just sitting there and passengers just up and about milling around the cabin.. One would think that given the potential for damange to the aircraft/passengers that this would be overridden somehow when the plane is "at cruise".. Anyone know the real answer?


User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (11 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 3018 times:

The doors will not open in flight whilst pressurised!

Most Boeing doors that I have come across, first open inwards a lttle bit and then slightly twist in the frame to open outwards as the inside of the door is slightly larger than the outside - this keeps the door in place when pressurised.

The inflight door opening I mentioned before is strictly controlled by the flight deck crew and is only used in extreme emergency, but the facility is there.

Believe me, don't even think about touching the red handle in flight as the cabin crew will restrain you for potentially endangering safety! As a matter if interest, and from memory, all Boeing doors open towards the front of the aircraft, and if you think, there's a good reason for that!

Overall, those sockets are for the cleaners ONLY! Don't touch 'em!



Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
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