Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
American Eagle Boarding Procedures  
User currently offlineTekelberry From United States of America, joined May 2003, 1459 posts, RR: 4
Posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 2533 times:

I recently took a trip aboard AA which included an AE segment. Their boarding procedures seem slightly different than AA's. Not only do they rip the boarding passes when you board and keep the bigger part (AA just gives back the whole pass), but the FA made us all show her our boarding passes once we got on the plane.

They also checked IDs for the 5000th time but I think that's just a DFW thing.

Are these AE procedures or just what the agents/FA felt like doing that day? Why do they differ from AA?

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN951U From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2495 times:

This is American Eagle standard procedure.
The reason for showing boarding pass is a standard process due to some outstations where passengers may walk outside to get to the aircraft (not in a controlled environment like a jetway).

Ripping the boarding passes is not always done in my experience, but seems to happen most of the time with Eagle.


User currently offlineAIR757200 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1579 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2473 times:


In DTW, when Eagle uses B-8 (hardly ever), the EGR is used for boarding passes and therefore, the BP remains intact. However, down at B-15, you are given the stub back so that the agent enters the seat numbers in the computer (all manual, no EGR).

However, in LGA, when I've flown AE, the EGR's never look as though they are working, so they rip the BP and give back the stub. One time, when the EGR was working, they still ripped it. Every station has their own variations.

The F/A checking the BP as you enter the aircraft as N951U mentioned is normal.




User currently offlineTekelberry From United States of America, joined May 2003, 1459 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 2454 times:

Oh, I thought it was just strange as we entered via a jetway and the fact that the electronic boarding machines were working.

User currently offlineMiami1 From Australia, joined Feb 2001, 706 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 2432 times:

Here in Australia FAs do the boarding for domestic flights (except when operayed by an International crew). One or two of us stand at the gate readers and welcome pax, assess cabin luggage etc. If for some reason the electronic ABC readers are not in use we kib the smaller end of the boarding pass for back up purposes and give the to the CSAs.

We still check the boarding passes at the door of the a/c irrespective of whether boarding is via stairs or an airbridge.


User currently offlineHighguy76 From United States of America, joined Jun 2003, 184 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 2410 times:

I wish airlines would get smart in the US and have enough FAs to have one or two assist with boarding at the gate. This would solve several problems before they get blown out of proportion on the AC, and I'm sure gate agents would appreciate the help.
hg76


User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2438 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 2388 times:

My wife was a gate agent for AA for 12 years. She said that some of the FAs she has met would struggle handling that job.


Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineAIR757200 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1579 posts, RR: 7
Reply 7, posted (11 years 2 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 2376 times:


Well, when there is an extra F/A on AA flights, they sometimes help with the EGR (they usually ask the lead agent if they need help).



User currently offlineN951U From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2339 times:

Well, when there is an extra F/A on AA flights

Extra F/A on an AA flight? The odds of winning the lotto are better than that.


User currently offlineAIR757200 From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 1579 posts, RR: 7
Reply 9, posted (11 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 2331 times:

Yes, an extra on AA flights, not as common now, but still out there.

[Edited 2003-06-26 23:42:03]

[Edited 2003-06-26 23:42:45]

User currently offlineKKMolokai From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 760 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (11 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 2293 times:

Yes, there are times when an extra flight attendant is scheduled on an AA flight, and yes, the flight attendants often volunteer to assist in the boarding process (operating the Gate Reader).

My experience as an agent has been that it is easier NOT to utilize the flight attendant in the boarding process. It is often faster and a lot more streamlined when boarding is done by the agents. There is less chance of "missed tickets" when the agents do the boarding.

However, when working an overbooked flight, a flight attendant's assistance is always appreciated!



We are the people of American Airlines. And we know why you fly.
User currently offlineMiami1 From Australia, joined Feb 2001, 706 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (11 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 2259 times:

In Australian there is a minimum number of FAs that are required on the a/c for boarding. This number may be higher if the a/c is also being refuelled during boarding. The minimum number of each a/c type varies according to exit configuration. This has nothing to do with the minimum number of FAs required for a flight.

Another example is if a crew are late from an inbound flight. The minimum number may be called of airport reserve just to stand on board while the CSAs board the flight at the gate. They stand around until the operating crew arrive.

Each a/c type has specific FAs which go to the gate for boarding. It isn't just a "helping out" thing. We work in conjunction with the CSAs at the desk. All we do is welcome pax and assess hand luggage and insert the boarding pass into the gate reader. The CSAs do all the checking in, announcements, computer stuff, dispatching etc.

I think it is a great system as we are ultimately in charge of who may come on board so it is much easier to stop problems at the gate. It is funny though the amount of pax that say "See you later..." as they pass the gate reader thinking the FAs are ground staff.

The system is great as it utilises FAs which would otherwiise be standing around on board doing nothing and it frees up CSAs to do what they are trained to do, not taking up their time at the electronic readers. Also it means less CSAs are required to be on duty.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
American Eagle:possible New Service? posted Sun Nov 26 2006 16:55:48 by CIDflyer
American Eagle Service (lack Of) posted Sat Nov 25 2006 07:32:37 by Pilotdude09
American Eagle ATR-42 Question posted Thu Nov 9 2006 19:03:33 by 28L28L
American Eagle's ATR Replacement When? posted Tue Oct 24 2006 01:03:20 by MIAUA777
American Eagle Saab 340 Ferried ABI-MSP posted Sun Sep 24 2006 04:34:51 by Pilottim747
What Will Happen To American Eagle At LAX? posted Sun Sep 3 2006 08:12:17 by Trvlr
American Eagle Dedicated Infant Seats...Why? posted Sat Aug 5 2006 04:09:56 by Cha747
American Eagle And CRJ-700 Problems posted Sat Jul 22 2006 21:46:26 by 757223
Delta Boarding Procedures posted Sat Jun 24 2006 22:27:51 by Newark777
American Eagle Jet Loses Hydraulic Power At PIT posted Mon Jun 12 2006 22:15:28 by N670UW