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Could I Live In Pittsburgh But Fly From Cleveland?  
User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8234 posts, RR: 23
Posted (11 years 2 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1842 times:

I know airlines have set crew bases, and I also know they sometimes fly pilots to their next assignment. My question is, though, could I live in a city that is not a crew base, yet fly from one that is? My example being Pittsburgh and Cleveland.


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18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIndustrialPate From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1839 times:

Yes. NW has many DTW-based crew members that live in Orlando.

User currently offlineSWAbubba From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 1785 times:

Generally speaking you can live wherever you want as long as you show up to work on time. Some folks have even commuted from overseas. It's up to you how much time you're willing to waste going back and forth. It's a much better job when you don't have to commute, though.

I used to commute BWI-OAK before I could hold Baltimore. It wasn't fun.


User currently offlineThomacf From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 542 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 1755 times:

Yes, I know three pilots that do this. One is a US Airways 737 Captain that commutes from CLE to PIT at the beginning of every tour. I also know a UA captain that commutes into ORD and a very good family friend who flies for CO commutes from SFO to IAH or CLE at the start of his tours.

User currently offlineSyncmaster From United States of America, joined Jul 2002, 2027 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 1740 times:
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I know a New York based CO pilot who lives in Michigan, so I would think you could.  Smile

User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8234 posts, RR: 23
Reply 5, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 1727 times:

Alright, cool. I guess it's been established that I can. I'm assuming the "commuting" you are talking about would be deadheading?


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User currently offlineExpratt From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days ago) and read 1699 times:

Since the driving time between PIT and CLE is probably only about 2 hours or so, it would probably be easier and quicker to just drive rather than do the deadheading routine.

User currently offlineSWAbubba From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days ago) and read 1685 times:

Not really. Deadheading means you are still getting paid even though you are sitting in the back. Usually deadheads start at your base and fly you to an outstation to start your trip or take you back to your base from an outstation at the end of a trip.

Commuting is on your own time and is not paid. The company doesn't care how you get to work (planes, trains, automobiles, bicycle, walk, etc) as long as you show up on time.


User currently offlineAirplanelover From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 329 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (11 years 2 months 3 days ago) and read 1673 times:

I lucky enough to be talking with a pilot from Delta, he lives in Pittsburgh but commutes to Cincinnati every day, and he said it is more common than you would think.

User currently offlineExpratt From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 1645 times:

Bubba, I guess I should have said commuting rather than deadheading. If the individual was commuting between PIT and CLE, I still think it would be easier to just drive rather than park at PIT, hope to get a seat to CLE, and fly up there and the same for the return.

User currently offlineSWAbubba From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 154 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 1639 times:

Expratt,

I was referring to N766UA's post, your post showed up in between.

You're right, that short of a trip would probably be easier to drive.


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8234 posts, RR: 23
Reply 11, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1599 times:

It might be easier to drive, but at 2 or 3 in the morning, would I really feel like driving 100 miles?


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User currently offlinePenguinflies From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 988 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1598 times:

I see Chautauqua pilots non-reving HNL-STL to get to work. Now that is a nice commute  Smile

User currently offlineAcidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1874 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1597 times:
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If you are a flight crew member and you are gone for days at a time, you might as well live in an affordable place, perhaps in an outlying area, as you aren't even home very much. CWA and RHI were popular bases at Mesaba for this reason, as the cost of living in rural Wisconsin is going to be significantly less than MSP, DTW or MEM and it is more peaceful. And if you ever want to get to one of the hub cities, you are just a flight away. CWA and RHI are no more than 60-80 min flights to MSP, which when you think about it would be a comparable drive for many people if they live in an outlying suburb into the airport as well as waiting for the crew bus. There is quite a lot of inter-hub and inter-base travel by crew members reporting for work. Last time I took the early morning NW MSP-DTW flight, I was stuck behind like 35 NW pilots and FA's reporting to work in DTW. I had never seen so many pilots in one place in my life!

Pilots sometimes rent space from someone or go in on a "crash pad" in the city they are based just in case they can't get home that night. The crash pad is usually just a furnished bedroom in a house or apartment with access to the house's amenities. They would also buy a cheap car as basic transportation from the airport to the crash pad. At Mesaba, the MSP parking lot at one point was totally riddled with junky old cars that never moved because crew members would get transferred around and just abandon their $500 car because they didn't need it anymore.



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User currently offlineExpratt From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 311 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 1569 times:

766UA, at 2 or 3 am, you are not going to find any flights in either direction. So driving is your only option at that hour.

User currently offlineMSYtristar From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 6564 posts, RR: 51
Reply 15, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 1564 times:

I work for Frontier in New Orleans, and we have about 3 pilots that live in the New Orleans' metro area that commute to the DEN hub quite often for work. So yes, it's doable. Also, Delta still has numerous flight attendant's living here, even though they recently closed their crew base. On the shuttle to the parking lot two days ago, I overheard 2 DL F/A's talking about how they just got back from NRT and LGW.


Steve in N.O


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8234 posts, RR: 23
Reply 16, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 1534 times:

Expratt- Hahaha, you've got a point there!


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User currently offlineElwood64151 From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 2477 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 1508 times:

I know someone who is a B6 F/A flying out of FLL but lives in Kansas City. She flies FL to FLL (no pun intended) and goe to her job at B6.

It's not difficult unless you can't jumpseat.



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User currently offlineWMUPilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 1473 posts, RR: 12
Reply 18, posted (11 years 2 months 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1464 times:

There are several C8/TZ pilots that live outside (well outside MDW) and jumpseat to work. Several pilots live in GRR, a couple in MCO, one in ANC. There are also a few WN pilots that live in GRR and fly to MDW. So it can be done.


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