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Evacuation Chute And Bridle Bone Disease  
User currently offlineOsteogenesis From Germany, joined May 2003, 647 posts, RR: 2
Posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2133 times:

After what happened today I want to ask a question I always wanted to ask.

I have the bridle bone disease (osteogenesis imperfecta) and can break a bone very easily.

I have been afraid of a situation like the one that happened today in Sydney. An emergency that wasn’t to serious that leads to an evacuation. This would be very dangerous for me. Even life threatening.

I always imagine some stewardess that does not understand my problem forcing me to get down the chute. I know that in case of a very dangerous situation it would be better to get down the chute and not stay on a burning aircraft.

Would it be possible to hand a letter to the crew on every flight explaining my situation and that if the situation was not to bad I would prefer to stay on board?


9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTekelberry From United States of America, joined May 2003, 1459 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2126 times:

IMO, the evacuation at SYD today was unjustified. It was pretty stupid to create mass panic without even knowing the full details of the problem.

Getting back to your question, I don't know too much about the disease but if you have ever ridden down a slide at a playground, I think you'd be alright as long as nothing malfunctioned.

But don't trust me on this as I have no other information about your disease besides for what you have told us. I also don't exactly know how high and don't know exactly how the slides work to say too much about them.

[Edited 2003-07-02 08:37:01]

User currently offlineOsteogenesis From Germany, joined May 2003, 647 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2121 times:

You are right. But I just want to make it clear that in my case the equation changes.

User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4491 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 2106 times:

Tekelberry,

Indeed it does seem like a dumb idea to evacuate the airplane with a wheel fire. It's only putting passengers close to the line of fire. If one of the plugs didn't melt and a tire overheated and blew,instead of deflating normally it could have spelled disaster.



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently offlineAussiePete From Australia, joined May 2003, 72 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2082 times:

Osteogenesis:
You are very much encouraged to notify the crew on any flight of such medical conditions. You will find that a professional crew will make contingencies for your problem and ensure that your risk is minimised.

Try it - you are obliged to ensure your personal safety is maximised.


User currently offlineOsteogenesis From Germany, joined May 2003, 647 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 2076 times:

Could there be a pilot that says: “If the danger for you of getting down the chute is so high I prefer you don’t fly”?

User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4575 posts, RR: 41
Reply 6, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2058 times:

Regarding the evacuation at Sydney - if there is the possibility the aircraft may be on fire, then it is very important to evacuate the aircraft quickly. As it turned out, there was no real danger. However, how are you supposed to know this on the spot when you are told there is smoke coming from the wheel assembly. Should you wait a few minutes and see if the things roars into an inferno before getting people off? Of course not.

I call your attention to Saudia flight SV163 on 19th August 1980. A fire broke out in the cargo hold just after the aircraft had departed Riyadh. The aircraft was turned around and landed at Riyadha. However, the crew elected to taxi the aircraft off the runway, and shut down the engines, before evacuating. The end result was that the inside of the aircraft burnt out, killing everyone on board. You can read more about it at http://aviation-safety.net/database/1980/800819-1.htm

If the possibility exists that the occupants are at risk, then they should be evacuated as quickly as possible. It is a lot easier to look back afterwards and decide whether risk warranted an evacuation, than to evacuate panicked passengers from a burning and smokefilled airliner.

Osteogenesis - I think it would be a wise idea to let the crew know of you condition, probably give them a letter from your doctor, just as it would be to let them know of any medical condition that may be relevant to the flight. However, I would suspect that in an emergency evacuation, you would be sent down the chute just like anyone else.

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineOsteogenesis From Germany, joined May 2003, 647 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2049 times:

However, I would suspect that in an emergency evacuation, you would be sent down the chute just like anyone else.

Yes I know.  Sad

Regarding the evacuation in Sydney you are absolutely right. I would have done the same if I was the pilot. In case of any type of fire I would immediately start evac.

On a LH flight from MEX to FRA I had a small fire onboard.

It was just after take of. Some kind of short circuit in the lights of the 747. It was immediately stopped by the flight attendants. It was a very frightening think. The flight continued with that section of lights turned of.


User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 1980 times:

Broken bones, friction burns and other, possibly serious, injuiries will always happen during an evacuation. Broken bones are a lot better than being inside a burning aircraft.

Tekelberry, how can you judge that the evacuation was unjustified? Were you there? Has the incident report come out yet? No.


User currently offlineOsteogenesis From Germany, joined May 2003, 647 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (11 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 1954 times:

Broken bones are a lot better than being inside a burning aircraft.

This is true for a normal person. When you have my condition things change a bit. When somebody has a broken bone I will have my entire body fractured. This could easily include a punctured vital organ.


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