Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Serious US Airways 767 Incident At SNN  
User currently offlineKaitak From Ireland, joined Aug 1999, 12428 posts, RR: 37
Posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8181 times:

This morning (31 August), a US 767 performed a safe diversion to SNN, while en route from PHL to Dublin. The aircraft, with 197 pax and 10 crew experienced a fire on board and the forward cabin filled with smoke; details are sketchy, but the problem is believed to have been an electrical fault. The plane landed safely at Shannon Airport, although it's understood that the aircraft descended to FL100 so that the crew could open cockpit windows (!?) and let the smoke blow out.

Thankfully, no serious injuries or illnesses, although no doubt the crew and pax got a nasty fright.

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineJaspike From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2008, 1 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8126 times:

At least everyone's ok, could have been a lot worse.

Josh


User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7407 posts, RR: 50
Reply 2, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8058 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Good Idea to perform smoke and fume elimination procedures. This should be training for cabin crews as well.


Made from jets!
User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8032 times:

This should be training for cabin crews as well.

It is (assuming of course that their training follows the Boeing manuals).


User currently offlineDoorsToManual From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8014 times:

it's understood that the aircraft descended to FL100 so that the crew could open cockpit windows (!?) and let the smoke blow out.

That sounds a little disconcerting to say the least!


User currently offlineJaspike From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2008, 1 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 7960 times:

I'd rather have the windows open and be able to see.. otherwise it'd mean sitting in smoke not being able to see a thing Laugh out loud

Josh


User currently offlineSpacepope From Vatican City, joined Dec 1999, 2914 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 7945 times:

This may be a tech/ops question, but how exactly does one open a window on a 762 in flight?

T.J.



The last of the famous international playboys
User currently offlineAirlinelover From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 5580 posts, RR: 23
Reply 7, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 7768 times:

If you are low enough, the pressue is usually not great enough to prevent it..

Chris



Lets do some sexy math. We add you, subtract your clothes, divide your legs and multiply
User currently offlineM717 From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 608 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 7655 times:

"This may be a tech/ops question, but how exactly does one open a window on a 762 in flight?"

Descend to 10,000 feet, depressurize the aircraft, then unlock the window and crank it aft to the open position.

Note: Only the clearview (side) windows are able to open/close.


User currently offlineHaveric From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1247 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 7653 times:

Whatever the problem, they must've fixed it and ferried the plane to DUB. Currently, US 307 is on its way to PHL about 4.5 hrs late. It departed at 5:58 Dublin time and will arrive in PHL at 8:07.

The plane is then scheduled to return to SNN as US 70, departing 1hr late at 9:30PM.



User currently offlineGodbless From Sweden, joined Apr 2000, 2752 posts, RR: 16
Reply 10, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 7473 times:

...the aircraft descended to FL100 so that the crew could open cockpit windows (!?) and let the smoke blow out
Does that mean that they flew backwards? Because otherwise the air would blow into the plane rather then the smoke getting sucked out.
But how did the smoke get into the cabin with the door more then sealed?

Max


User currently offlineJetMARC From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 7289 times:

I heard United Airlines trains their flight attendants to use belts and seatbelt extentions and strap them between door assist handles (as a barrier) and crack open doors below FL100 on the B747s on long over water flights should it be necessary to vent smoke and fumes during an inflight fire since landing on water is a last option...... is this true and/or possible??


"Sucka, I'm gonna send you out on Knuckle Airlines. Fist Class!!" ~ Mr. T
User currently offlineFly-K From Germany, joined May 2000, 3149 posts, RR: 51
Reply 12, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 7182 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Wow that must have been quite a storm in the cockpit.
My car doesn't go 200mph, and even if it did, I wouldn't open the windows unless I'm forced to.

Max, I assume the smoke was spread via the aircon ducts.
(Compare to how the fire spread on SR111)

Konstantin



Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been...
User currently offlineUSAir330 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 822 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 7132 times:

Gotta love the way US Airways handles emergencys  Smile.... I'd fly with them on the 767 anytime!

User currently offlineHaveric From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 1247 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 7116 times:

this is the second or third (safe) emergency of this sort since the Ireland service began earlier this year...

On another PHL-DUB flight, an engine went out and the plane safely returned to Halifax.


User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 6842 times:

I heard United Airlines trains their flight attendants to use belts and seatbelt extentions and strap them between door assist handles (as a barrier) and crack open doors below FL100 on the B747s on long over water flights should it be necessary to vent smoke and fumes during an inflight fire since landing on water is a last option...... is this true and/or possible??

Again, I can't speak for UAL specifically, but that is a Boeing reccomended procedure that is noted in the 747 training manual so I have no doubt that they do indeed teach it.


User currently offlineCx flyboy From Hong Kong, joined Dec 1999, 6597 posts, RR: 55
Reply 16, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6386 times:

On the 747 you open doors 2 and 4 on one side of the aircraft and apparently it works very efficiently in sucking out the air. The gap opened is no more than a couple of inches and is actually quite difficult to open more than that due to the air pressure.

User currently offlineN670UW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1603 posts, RR: 8
Reply 17, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6351 times:

Strangely enough, the flight departed PHL about 3 hours late, due to maintenance issues.

[Edited 2003-09-01 03:22:17]

User currently offlineCmckeithen From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 617 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6267 times:

It sounds like the crew handled the situation very well. What was the flight number?

User currently offlineJohn From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 1374 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6194 times:

Those 767s are getting TIRED! US Airways flys the shit out of 'em! The 332 fleet can't come soon enough! Until then, perhaps US should consider leasing more wide body equip in the interim, they could certainly use them, even on some domestic runs.

User currently offlineNordo From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 29 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks ago) and read 6174 times:

What was the flight number from PHL to DUB?

User currently offlineN670UW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1603 posts, RR: 8
Reply 21, posted (10 years 11 months 4 weeks ago) and read 6144 times:

US 306

filler

filler

filler


User currently offlineRhodylee From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 85 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 5905 times:

I drove by Bradley Airport in CT on Saturday and there was a USAirways A330 and a 767 sitting on the ramp. I sat and watched for a few minutes, then they taxied to the runway and took off, within a couple minutes of each other.

Any idea what they were doing there?


User currently offlineN670UW From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1603 posts, RR: 8
Reply 23, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 5837 times:

Saturday was a bad day for US Airways on the transatlantic front.

US 27 (CDG-PHL, A330) was diverted to BDL.
US 307 (DUB-PHL, 767) was diverted to BDL.
US 43 (AMS-PHL, 767) was diverted to RIC.
US 15 (MUC-PHL, 767) was cancelled.
US 49 (CDG-PHL, 767) was cancelled.


User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 24, posted (10 years 11 months 3 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 5747 times:

US is indeed considering acquiring 332s from Swiss in the interim. They line up perfectly as the US fleet is PW powered.

I wonder why US chose PW to power their 332s? They have a GE powered 767 fleet, RR powered 757s, and a CFM powered fleet of narrowbodies.

One would have thought they'd go with GE on this one.

N


25 N670UW : The 333's are PW-powered.
26 Gigneil : Yeah I really meant to just say A330s... I was aware that the 333s were also PW powered. N
27 Kevin752 : I am glad that nobldy was hurt and the 767-200 is still okay. I really would like to do a 767-200 flight before those planes are taken from Service.
28 Rhodylee : That sure was a bad day! There must have been a lot of unhappy passengers.
29 BAGSMASHER : The original US 767s are leftovers from the Piedmont days. That is probably the reason for the GE engines.
30 Haveric : Philly had some really bad t-storms that day.
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
US Airways 767-200ER At CUN... posted Thu Jul 27 2006 06:50:26 by Thering
Why US Airways Is Big At Losing... posted Mon Oct 9 2006 00:52:43 by JetBlueAUS
Respected US Airways Exec Dies At Age 47 posted Mon Sep 11 2006 20:38:51 by Jmc1975
No CRJ900's For US Airways - For Now At Least posted Mon Aug 14 2006 21:19:33 by Planemaker
Thai Airways B744 Incident at MAD Today posted Sat Jul 15 2006 18:48:57 by Skyteam2000
Us Airways Envoy Experience At PHL posted Sun Jun 4 2006 07:03:12 by Boeing 747-311
US Airways Painted Jet At JFK posted Mon May 29 2006 23:07:02 by Nycfly75
US Airways Service Meltdown At DCA This Morning posted Sun Apr 9 2006 18:19:25 by Hoya
US Airways 767 Cabin posted Tue Mar 7 2006 07:04:42 by Waleckdaddy
US Airways Emergency Landing At Amsterdam Schiphol posted Tue Nov 22 2005 14:32:17 by Singel09