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UA 777 Diversion From AKL  
User currently offlineIrishpower From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 385 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 5263 times:

Hey, I recall a story in the news earlier this year where a UA 777 from AKL to LAX diverted to either KOA or HNL due to an engine shutdown. It flew for something like 187 minutes on one engine (an ETOPS record).

Does anyone know the registration of the aircraft involved or have any articles about this event????? I'd like to know more.

Thanks, Sean.

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineIrishpower From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 385 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4978 times:

Anyone know about this?

User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 2, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4928 times:

I know of it... but I don't have any more detail than you, unfortunately.

N


User currently offlineKjet12 From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 975 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4919 times:

I know my aunt was working at UA HNL Station Operations that evening and was in charge of getting the UA ground staff ready for an emergency landing in HNL and updating the fire department on the situation. The 777 ended up landing in KOA.

Kris



AA - Doing what we do best.
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4898 times:

I can also confirm it. I believe it landed 2-3 minutes short of hitting the 180-minute ETOPS benchmark. Had it gone 187 minutes, it would have been a violation of the rule.

Not sure the reason why, but as you might expect, it was kept quiet.


User currently offlineN79969 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4699 times:

Actually there was a pretty good article in Aviation Week and was reported in other places. It definitely made the aviation press. Actually, it was the longest single engine diversion ever. It occured March 17.

You may want check the NTSB database.


User currently offlineJBirdAV8r From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 4488 posts, RR: 21
Reply 6, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 4642 times:

Had it gone 187 minutes, it would have been a violation of the rule.

I'm not an ETOPS expert by any stretch of the imagination, but isn't the time requirement based solely on forecast conditions and such? If the route as planned would have been legal for ETOPS, regardless of how long the airplane flew single-engine, they'd be legal...right? I mean, obviously the time enroute estimates were off somewhat (forecast winds aloft are still not an exact science)...



I got my head checked--by a jumbo jet
User currently offlineIrishpower From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 385 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4536 times:

Thanks guys. I'll check it out.

User currently offlineUal777contrail From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4462 times:

I think the difference was that it went that long on 1 engine but they could have fired the other back up. The engine didn't blow or quit I believe it was over heating so they shut it down.


ual 777 contrail


User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2386 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 4413 times:

From http://www.dispatcher.org/enews/archives/APR2003/enews.html

Record Diversion

United 777 flies for 192 min. on a single PW4077, longest ever ETOPS diversion


United Airlines' Boeing 777 carrying 255 passengers flew over the mid-Pacific Ocean against strong headwinds for 192 min. under single-engine power Mar. 17 to land without incident at Kona on the western coast of the big island of Hawaii. Boeing confirmed that it was the longest single-engine diversion during Extended Twin Operations (ETOPS) since the advent of transoceanic twin-engine flights 20 years ago by a Trans World Airlines Boeing 767-200.

United spokesman Joe Hopkins said the 777 crew shut down the No. 2 PW4077-90 power plant after the engine indication and crew alerting system (EICAS) displayed a high oil temperature and low oil quantity. The No. 1 engine powered the aircraft, operating as Flight 842, for the next 3+ hr. to the Kona landing.

THE 777 HAD DEPARTED Auckland, New Zealand, bound for Los Angeles. Hopkins said the 777 was likely well past the midway point to Hawaii when the engine was shut down. United was operating the 777 in ETOPS mode on a route that, for planning purposes, is 180 min. from a suitable airport in still air with one engine operating. A Boeing official said the crew expected a 180-min.-long diversion but the 777 encountered headwinds that extended the flight by another 12 min.

The diversion during the ETOPS portion of the flight was the third recorded for all 777s, which have completed more than 400,000 flights under the FAA rules for extended-range operations. A 767 held the previous record for diversion length, but it was "not close" to the Mar. 17 diversion time, the manufacturer's spokesman said.

A PRATT & WHITNEY OFFICIAL said a detector in the No. 2 engine showed evidence of chips. Pratt and United will investigate what caused the problem.

Hopkins said United's 777 fleet has recorded a total of 16 inflight shutdowns during all phases of flight since the carrier's first 777 flight in May 1995. The United 777s have flown 2.3 million hr. during the eight years, with an inflight engine shut down rate of 0.0021 per 1,000 engine hours. United operates 60 777s. The aircraft was expected to be out of service at Kona for at least two days, if not more. United shipped a replacement engine by air to Hawaii, but it had to be placed on an oceangoing barge to reach the Kona airport where it was to be installed. In addition to the crew on board Flight 842, 10 passengers occupied the first-class cabin, 47 were in business-class and 198 in economy. After the Kona landing, passengers were accommodated on United and other airline flights.


User currently offlineThe777Man From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 6491 posts, RR: 55
Reply 10, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 4239 times:

This also discussed when this happened in March and in that post the reg. of the aircraft is mentioned. Try the search function when it works again.

The777Man



Need a Boeing 777 Firing Order....Further to fly....CI, MU, LX and LH 777s
User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 11, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 4087 times:

Interesting that PW refers to the PW 4090 as the PW4077-90.

Either the article is badly wrong, or we've just been mistaken.

N


User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (10 years 10 months 2 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 3983 times:

Yeah, no way in heck that this was a PW4077

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