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Airline Management Resources  
User currently offlineNW747-400 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 502 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 1753 times:

Hi Everyone - I am exploring the idea of writing this semester's research report on how to manage a profitable airline. I would like to do sort of a compare/contrast paper with a profitable airline comparing to a stuggling airline. If anyone can help me out with some good sources on airline profits and things of that nature, I would be greatly appreciative. Thanks in advance.

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBrett80211 From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 266 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 1744 times:

Read the book...Nuts! By Kevin and Jackie Freiberg. It's a bussiness book about Southwest Airlines. It was a great read, I suggest you do so. I should help you out alot.-Brett

User currently offlineAirT85 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 15 hours ago) and read 1732 times:

Also look into "From Worst to First" by Gordon Bethune, its all about turning Continental around and the management/business practices employed to do so. It is also a good read!

-Tony


User currently offlineWestJetYYZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 1719 times:

There was an excellent article written about WestJet titled:
"WestJet Airlines: The Culture that breeds a Passion to Succeed".

It was written by Ken Mark, for the Richard Ivey School of Business. The document reference number is 9B01C024. However I believe it is still available @ www.westjet.ca , perhaps in the About Us section? I will try to locate it for you. Drop me an e-mail if you wish, if I cannot find it, I have a copy I could probably e-mail


User currently offlineElwood64151 From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 2477 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 1672 times:

For a look at the operations of some of the legacy carriers, read "Eagle" by Rod Serling. His love of AA comes through as a bias, but it's good information about how the airline operated and what Bob Crandall and CR Smith did to turn the airline around during its crisis years...

There is another book whose name I can't remember that talks about the airline industry of the mid-1990s. It was published in 1996/7, and has chapters about WN, AA, CO, and ValueJet (pre-crash). It's incredibly detailed, and if I remember it's name, I'll post it. Check your library, that's where I got it. It's hardback is A7 paper sized (about 10x6) and is about 400 pages long.



Those who fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it in summer school.
User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 1674 times:

For a look at the operations of some of the legacy carriers, read "Eagle" by Rod Serling. His love of AA comes through as a bias, but it's good information about how the airline operated and what Bob Crandall and CR Smith did to turn the airline around during its crisis years...

I don't know about Robert Serling's bias for AA (he's actually the older brother of Rod Serling), but his books are all absolutely fantastic - and "Eagle" is the best of the lot. Him and Bob Davies are undoubtedly the two best aviation historians out there, bar none.


User currently offlineElwood64151 From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 2477 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 1653 times:

Oops, I meant Robert... Sometimes the keys get away from me...

Actually, I do think he's biased toward's AA, but it doesn't interfere with the excellent storytelling and the informative value of his books. He just makes it seem more grande than it is sometimes...



Those who fail to learn history are doomed to repeat it in summer school.
User currently offlineMoPac From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 215 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 11 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 1633 times:

Hey Jack-

The best/ most interesting book I have come across that deals with the industry as a whole and actually compares the different airline/ types of airlines is "Hard Landing" by Thomas Petzinger. It was first published in '94 I think, so you should be able to find an old copy online, if not then http://www.petzinger.com/OtherBooks.shtml The book focuses on the post deregulation era up until like 1993. It does go into detail on the differences between No Frill and Frill but won't take you up to the JetBlue era. Needless to say, this is my favorite airline industry book and my copy is now in several pieces I read it so many times and used it for so many reports in college.

>One little example (that I used for a couple of reports) was the People Express vs. American issue. AA was able to compile their Computer Reservation Sys' historical data to figure out how many seats on a given flight to sell at a discount while still gouging the last minute guy who *had* to fly. People Express on the other hand offered all seats on the flight at the same price. Their failure to "deploy yield management" meant that they were giving up revenue buy allowing the guy who was willing pay top dollar if need be get away with buying a dirt cheap ticket. This example has been cited numerous times by a.neters who have obviously read the book, and I would recommend it even if not for the project.

Does this report have to focus on "how to manage a profitable airline compare/contrast paper with a profitable airline to a struggling airline"? Depending on whether your still in High School and what class this is for (if college) I would shy away from the "how to manage a profitable airline" part. However, there are endless sources if you do it based on the contrast between profitable/struggling airlines, especially if you make it in a historical context, like post-deregulation to post 9/11. That kind of subject will give you plenty of hard reading sources like any of the above mentioned as well as some easy online reference articles for the post 9/11 part.


Tip: If you include an interview with either the author or one of the subjects you can score some major brownie points. During College I managed interviews/corespondence with a number of current and former airline executives. Almost all of the retired guys will talk to you if you can get ahold of their e-mail address (My first windfall was a Braniff report. This report led me to track down an old documentary on the failure, which led me to PBS, who led me to the producer, who is now a talk show host, and he put me in contact with the various executives directly). At very least the authors are usually very accommodating to e-mails, hell Petzinger's e-mail is pasted all over his site. Something to ponder anyway.

Regards


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