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Happy Birthday Newark Airport! 75 Years!  
User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16810 posts, RR: 51
Posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3189 times:

"Newark Airport keeps rolling

Wednesday, October 01, 2003

BY RON MARSICO
Star-Ledger Staff

Aviation pioneers Lindbergh and Earhart flew from its runways.

The world's first air traffic control center was built there.

PeopleExpress ushered in an age of discount fares from the old North Terminal in the early 1980s, and Continental Airlines made the hub the region's busiest from the new Terminal C in the late 1990s.

On Oct. 1, 1928 -- 75 years ago today -- operations officially began at what was originally called Newark Municipal Airport, a hub built on 68 acres of marshland at the behest of municipal officials.

"They said, 'We've got to get an airport, get in on the air age,'" said Dave Morris, the airport's historian. "They got the jump."

Today, at what is now Newark Liberty International Airport, Gov. James E. McGreevey will mark the anniversary by leading a low-key ceremony in the refurbished original terminal, a 1935 art deco structure with a vintage control tower that is now the airport's administration building.

Since its opening, Newark Airport has been a place of firsts.

Along with the first control tower, the airport claims the world's first paved runway, first lighted runway and first passenger terminal.

It has also had its dark moments.

On Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked United Airlines Flight 93, which had departed from Terminal A en route to San Francisco. The plane, which authorities said was likely being diverted to crash into a Washington, D.C., landmark, plummeted into a Pennsylvania field after passengers stormed the cockpit.

Not long after it opened, Newark Airport quickly became the world's busiest, serving 90,000 passengers in 1931 and 350,000 seven years later. In the early 1940s, the Army Air Corps took over the airport for the duration of World War II. In 1948, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey assumed control and continues to run the airport today.

Last year, 29.2 million passengers flew into and out of Newark, making it the nation's 12th busiest hub.

"It's grown as America has grown. And it's grown as the Port Authority has grown," Port Authority Chairman Anthony Coscia said, citing the agency's $3.8 billion investment in the complex over the past five years. "That airport has found a way to keep pace with those changes."

Seventy-five years ago, Newark Airport's primary mission was transporting mail, not flying people.

"Air mail started this whole thing," said William DeCota, the Port Authority's aviation director.

During the 1930s, mail was trucked from Manhattan across the Pulaski Skyway to Newark Airport. By 1938, planes there were hauling 5 million pounds of mail a year. Soon after, however, New York Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia won a power struggle between the city and New Jersey and the air mail depot was moved to a fledgling Queens airport that would one day bear his name.

Among the earliest planes to use Newark Airport were Ford Tri-Motors and Curtiss Condors, Morris said, noting that pilots landed on a cinder runway affectionately known as "the cinder patch." Then came the two-engine Boeing 247, which carried 10 passengers, and the all-metal DC-3, which held 21 passengers, "unheard of for that time," he said.

Morris recalled making trips to the airport as a boy and seeing the DC-3, which was used by American Airlines in 1936 for the Newark-to-Chicago run.

"I couldn't believe it had curtains on the windows," said Morris, who later spent 36 years at the airport for the Port Authority. "It was like flying from your living room."

An airport legend, William "Whitey" Conrad, who died in 2000 at the age of 95, pioneered air traffic control at Newark Airport, beginning with two flags -- red and green -- as he stood atop a wooden tower directing pilots next to the airport's hangar.

"It was a half-assed operation, but it worked," Conrad said in a 1996 interview.

He even found romance at the airport.

"I was on the second floor of the building, and he used to come in front of the doors, eating an ice cream cone," said his widow, 91-year-old Catherine Conrad, who did payroll for a company based at the historic art deco terminal. "He used to come in front of the doors, eating an ice cream cone."

"Whitey" Conrad retired in the 1960s as chief of the airport's fourth control tower -- a 147-foot structure that was in use until May of this year. He lived to see the blueprints for the new $22.4 million concrete tower that rises 325 feet.

As the control towers grew taller, the number of passengers using Newark Airport also grew. Close to 7 million people a year used the airport by the 1970s, but the number of passengers really took off in the 1980s and 1990s with the advent of PeopleExpress and Continental. Aided by relatively easy accessibility, the number of fliers peaked at 34.2 million in 2000 before the recession and 9/11. In 2001, Newark scored a regional first -- an AirTrain monorail service.

Princeton University professor Jameson Doig, who wrote "Empire on the Hudson," a history of the Port Authority, said the airport has helped both the state's image and its economy.

"Newark Airport became even more important for the whole region than had been anticipated," Doig said, crediting the Port Authority for wise investments that spurred its growth. "Newark Airport ... brings credit to an agency that is often criticized."

Looking to the future, DeCota, the aviation director, said the goal is to increase the number of fliers by 50 percent, to 45 million, over the next 15 years, while also increasing air cargo by 50 percent.

Such growth, however, faces constraints by the airport's limited size.

"The challenge for us is how to get 45 million passengers through an airport that's only 2,000 acres," said DeCota, who envisions higher capacity planes and moving more nonessential services such as parking off-site eventually. "The challenge for us is to maximize the horizontal geography of Newark Airport."



Ron Marsico covers Newark Liberty International Airport. He can be reached at rmarsico@starledger.com or (973) 392-7860.

http://nj.com/news/ledger/jersey/index.ssf?/base/news-4/1064986873179650.xml


Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3167 times:

Too bad EWR had to lose its title as NYC's busiest on the year of its Jubilee... sorta sux  Laugh out loud

User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16810 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 3148 times:

Without Jetblue JFK's traffic is going the other direction, I would not brag about the success of Jet Blue. The track record of "start-ups" is not good, and B6 is still an "infant".




Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlineTommy767 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 6584 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 3125 times:

Well anyway, Happy B-day EWR!

Hope you expand greatly in the future!



"Folks that's the news and I'm outta here!" -- Dennis Miller
User currently offlineSHUPirate1 From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 3670 posts, RR: 17
Reply 4, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 3107 times:

BTW, are there any traffic restrictions at JFK? I ask simply because I was wondering about the lack of JFK-ORD flights (none on AA, one a week on UA) and each of the top two majors at JFK (AA and DL) both have more daily departures out of LGA, and most of JFK's traffic on those two airlines is international...I know LGA has (or had) a 1500 mile perimeter, but I was wondering about JFK...


Burma's constitutional referendum options: A. Yes, B. Go to Insein Prison!
User currently offlineJAL777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 3102 times:

Why in the world would you need JFK-ORD flights?? The destinations served out of JFK are the same or more then those served out of ORD. JFK-ORD is a O/D market.

If your from NYC its much easier to go to LGA. If your from NJ go to Newark.


User currently offlineCaptainStabbin From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3075 times:

Without Jetblue JFK's traffic is going the other direction, I would not brag about the success of Jet Blue. The track record of "start-ups" is not good, and B6 is still an "infant".

Changes nothing. Face the facts: JFK now handles more passengers than EWR. Why make excuses?

And how do you know B6 will fold? Are you a psychic or something? Seems like you want this airline to fail. B6 is the best thing that's happens to tri-state aviation in years.


User currently offlineFlyguy1 From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 1738 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3043 times:

STT, you seem to want everything at JFK to fail. What gives ?


727, L1011, MD80, A300, 777-200, 737-300, 737-700, 747-400, 757-200, 737-800, A320. E190, E135, 767-200, CRJ9
User currently offlineGoboeing From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 2682 posts, RR: 14
Reply 8, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2991 times:

Happy birthday EWR! I think it's a great example of how a hub operation should work. Continental Express and mainline work effeciently out of that relatively small airport considering the number of people who fly out of there.


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Nick


User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16810 posts, RR: 51
Reply 9, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 2989 times:

Where exactly did I state or infer that B6 would fail?

I said,

"I would not brag about the success of Jet Blue. The track record of "start-ups" is not good, and B6 is still an "infant"."

Where did I say Jet Blue is going to fail? Im curious as to why the hostile comments?

Are they not "infants" or a Start up? What is the Success rate of "start ups" in the US Airline industry over the last 20 years? Is there not cause for a little scepticism? What I meant by my comments which I strongly stand by is that success and popularity come and go, B6 has not proven anything except that they can stir up interest. 10-15 years from now is when anyone can say they have been a success or failure, not 3-4 years after they were launched.

JFK's recent surge in passenger growth is directly attributed to B6, without which DL, AA and the rest are dragging JFK down (along with EWR and LGA). The fact that B6 is a "start up" and start ups having the history that they do in the deregulated US Airline industry does not make a strong case to boast about JFK's long term ability to sustain the growth.






Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16810 posts, RR: 51
Reply 10, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2969 times:

" JFK now handles more passengers than EWR. Why make excuses?"

For 2002 (Millions)
EWR 29.2, JFK 29.9

Wow so JFK got a couple hundred thousand more over the course of a year than EWR, with all of B6's expansion (yada yada yada) JFK is still WAY behind the passenger numbers Newark put up 3 years ago.

In 2000 Newark handled 34.4 Million passengers, the drop in travelers at EWR and LGA is directly attributed to the drop in demand for Business travel. Since JFK has such a weak business travel market they were less affected, however it also means they are less likely to enjoy the benefits of the economic recovery.

From the Port Authority's website..

Business Travelers make up 41% of Newark Airports passenger traffic

Business Travelers make up 45% of Laguardia Airports passenger traffic

Business travelers make up 25% (!.) of JFK's passenger traffic

Average household income for Newark Airport traveler $86,000

Average household income for Laguardia Airport traveler $79,000

Average household income for JFK Airport traveler $79,000

What do these figures tell us? They say that the long term low cost (B6) growth at JFK is good, but that the long term growth for "legacy" carriers such as AA and/ or DL is poor.

The better Jet Blue does at JFK the worst it gets for AA and DL, AA is scaling back their terminal project to 39 gates from the originally envisoned 55. DL never even launched their expansion/move to Terminal 4.

I love JFK, I travel from there and visit often.

However personally I would rather see AA and DL do well at JFK than B6, because in the long run I think it would be better for JFK. The rapid growth of B6 and their low fares have squashed any hopes that AA or DL had of developing a hub or viable Domestic network at JFK to compete with CO's Newark hub ,which is what AA and DL (if they had gone ahead with their terminal project) had enviosend when launching their Terminal projects.

Then along came Jet Blue..




Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
User currently offlineCaptainStabbin From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2941 times:

I don’t really care about what happened three years ago. I care about what is going on now and JFK is busier than EWR at this time. Nothing you do or say will change this, so deal! And stop making lame-ass excuses.

Your attitude towards B6 passengers is really absurd. It appears that you think they don’t count as much because they’re low-fare. Got news for you, bub, regardless of what a passenger pays for his ticket, a passenger is a passenger is a passenger and they are counted all the same when they use an airport.

The figures you provide tell us absolutely nothing about long-term trends, unless you were taught how to read differently than I was. The ONLY thing they tell us is the pax distribution at a certain period of time. I am an Econ/Stat major and I deal with statistics on a daily basis with my job, and I don’t see how one can project the future on a simple distribution of the present.

Oh yeah, Jersey has the highest per-capita income in the Union, so obviously the PCI will be higher for EWR passengers. But so what? It doesn’t change the fact that that fewer of them are flying through EWR than NYers out of JFK.

Furthermore, if you look at the PA’s website, you will notice that JFK and LGA have both gained pax numbers this past year; EWR’s has continued to fall.

As well, Song is doing very well out of JFK (and the other two airports). You never know, they might expand on that. Besides, DL scrapped their terminal project because they were losing too much money overall (nothing to do with their operations out of JFK or B6). Speaking of AA, their woes are from gross mismanagement and a broken business model. They are scaling back their project because they can’t afford to keep it up (again, nothing to do with how their operations are at JFK or B6 encroaching on them).

For the future, I think the PA said before that JFK really is the future for expansion in the tri-state area. EWR simply cannot grow in the limited space that is has. JFK is under capacity and does have room to grow and the AirTrain will make connections much easier in the future. And we all know about LGA...

Look, I have nothing against EWR. Hell, I have flown out of there more the last year than from the other two airports. I’m not even originally from NY, so I really have no ties or attachments to any airports or areas here. But your arguments and your attitude are really silly here.


User currently offlineSTT757 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 16810 posts, RR: 51
Reply 12, posted (10 years 9 months 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2894 times:

"For the future, I think the PA said before that JFK really is the future for expansion in the tri-state area. EWR simply cannot grow in the limited space that is has"

The article I posted has a quote from William Decota aviation director for the Port Authority which states about Newark..

"Looking to the future, DeCota, the aviation director, said the goal is to increase the number of fliers by 50 percent, to 45 million, over the next 15 years, while also increasing air cargo by 50 percent. "

"Your attitude towards B6 passengers is really absurd. It appears that you think they don’t count as much because they’re low-fare".

They don't count as much when it comes to generating revenue, also low cost "flip floppers" do not travel nearly as much as business travelers. Business travelers fly more, pay more, and tend to be more loyal to an airline and it's program than passengers who choose low cost carriers.

Your mentioning of Song solidifies my point that these Low cost carriers (save WN) have very little to no customer loyalty, it's most service for lowest fare wins.

"I’m not even originally from NY"

Im born in NYC and raised in NJ, I think Im a little more objective since I have spent my life (28 years) on both sides of the river.

I saw (flew) the booming success of PeoplExpress which sent Newark skyrocketing to record high passenger numbers in the 1980s only to collapse, so far Nielman (who worked at PE) has got the boom part going. Lets see if he can avoid the bust, that's the measurement of success.

Low fare carriers and even low price markets like Walmart boom in bad times and tend to be flat in good times, why? Cause history teaches that when people can pay more they often will pay more, Jet Blue is the airline equivilent of Target, where WN is the equivilent of Wal Mart.

These stores do well most of the time, but their growth potential during "boom" times is limited to their lower priced products. However stores like Macys, Bloomingdales etc (which are like the Legacy carriers, AA, CO, DL etc) have much greater potential to generate high revenues because of their product lines.

Controling costs are an intregal part of long term success for Legacy carriers, if they can stay lean and mean and not over extend during the good times they would be much better able to maintain their buisiness during down times. The closest legacy carrier to this model is CO followed by DL, both of which grew moderately during boom times and instead realied on productivity rather than physical expansion which protects their business model.

AA and UAL too much into the expansion, giving out huge payraises, buying TWA et, it would have paid off if the "good times" continued. They did not plan well for down cycles, which is bad management.

The economic recovery has started albeit slowly, the first carriers out of the red and into the black will be CO, DL, NWA.



Eastern Air lines flt # 701, EWR-MCO Boeing 757
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