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MD-80 Flying Without A Tailcone?  
User currently offlineLindy field From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 3147 posts, RR: 13
Posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3671 times:
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I was just browsing through the database and came across the following interesting photo with a surprisingly low number of hits. What happens when the tailcone falls off your MD-80? How significant an event is this? How often does it happen?

I suppose the answers may be "not much," but it's still an interesting photo.

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Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Don Boyd



22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAA777MIA From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 686 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3525 times:

Can you say WOOPS! LOL....

User currently offlineAirliner777 From United States of America, joined May 2000, 495 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3500 times:

Was that a "Ready to Evacuate" new feature back then? HEHEHE

User currently offlineCedarjet From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 8392 posts, RR: 54
Reply 3, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3438 times:

Jeez, I bet it was incredibly noisy and scary in the back. Oh wait, it was an MD80, it's always like that - how could they tell? And where did the tailcone actually become reunited with the ground?


fly Saha Air 707s daily from Tehran's downtown Mehrabad to Mashhad, Kish Island and Ahwaz
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3384 times:

It certainly doesn't happen very often. Other than the MIA photo you posted, I can only recall one other, an Air Canada DC-9 back in the 1980s sometime, up in the NE somewhere. There may be others, but I'm not aware of them.

As far as effects go, I'd imagine that the changed aerodynamics might create some general buffeting or maybe some vibrations felt in the rudder, but I'm sure the pilots here can provide more authortative info....


User currently offlineAA777MIA From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 686 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3310 times:

Can you imagine what the flight attendant sitting on the door back there felt like afterward, LOL...

User currently offlineBromma1968 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3296 times:

I've read about a SAS DC-9-41 that lost its tailcone in the eighties, but I haven't heard much about simular events. What a horrible thing to get
in your head.

Anders


User currently offlineCessna172RG From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 750 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3132 times:

Seeing that it's in the old colors... I bet a disgruntled employee took it home with him to protest how Frank Lorenzo fired 2/3 of the workers...

...ok, bad joke...

I bet it was replaced with a tail cone from Eastern!

...another bad joke...

Ok, you can throw tomatoes at me!



Save the whales...for dinner!!!
User currently offlineBeltwaybandit From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 495 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 3034 times:

I doubt that you could do a revenue flight without the tailcone, but I think it could be ferried without the cone. It is not a part of the pressurized hull, so you can lose it without risking life and limb, and is mostly cosmetic. There is, I believe, a liferaft in there that may fall out!

User currently offlineNwfltattendant From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 341 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2956 times:

Beltway.......

In the tailcone of the DC9/MD80, theres a self inflating slide, which deploys as soon as the cone is dropped. HOWEVER. Seeing as there isnt a slide trailing behind in the wind, I would say that the slidepack departed the aircraft along with the tailcone. I will post a picture of such in a few hours.



Go yakkin !!!!!!
User currently offlineLMP737 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 4781 posts, RR: 22
Reply 10, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2875 times:

During testing of the MD-80 the first test aircraft made a very hard landing. Not only did the tailcone come off but the entire tail aft of the pressure bulkhead, vertical and horizontal. Evidently the crew misjudged their decent rate.


Never take financial advice from co-workers.
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 2849 times:

LMP737,

Was that the one at YUM with an FAA guy in the left seat? If so, I've heard that a video exists but I've yet to see it...


User currently offlineLMP737 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 4781 posts, RR: 22
Reply 12, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2781 times:

Yes I believe it was Yuma, not sure if the FAA was riding along. When I was working for Boeing I saw the video. In slo-mo you see the airframe flex and the tail come off. In normal time it was quite obvious he was coming in to fast. On of the technicians on board thought it was a rough landing but had no idea as to the damage. When he opened the aft door way he looked out onto open sky. Quite a shocker.


Never take financial advice from co-workers.
User currently offlineDa man From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 887 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 2741 times:

I remember watching a movie where the tailcone of a DC-9 (I think) was jetisoned in flight. It was about an airborne bank heist. Great airborne shots of a Lockheed Jetstar in the film as well. I just can't remember the name of it.


War Eagle!
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 2611 times:

That would have been "Cliffhanger".....

User currently offlineMD88Captain From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 1343 posts, RR: 20
Reply 15, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 2572 times:

It was probably just a maintenance ferry flight.

User currently offlineAirdude66 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 2482 times:

This is taking down-sizing too far.

Sorry - We lost our ass on take-off!


User currently offlineAndrewuber From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2528 posts, RR: 38
Reply 17, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 2476 times:

Here's another freaky incident that happened in flight - and this one was NOT a ferry!

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Torsten Maiwald


Imagine what the pucker factor was on that one while on short final!



I'd rather shoot BAD_MOTIVE
User currently offlineAirdude66 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 2454 times:

This is a great idea for those passengers who say,

I'll never fly this airline again.


User currently offlineQqflyboy From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2319 posts, RR: 13
Reply 19, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2378 times:

Da man:

Would that have been about DB Cooper? I think the real thing happened on a Northwest 727. ???



The views expressed are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect my employer’s views.
User currently offlineTrnsWrld From United States of America, joined May 1999, 1030 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2333 times:

Any idea of where to locate this hard landing and tail damage online or anywhere else? I am very interested in seeing that.

User currently offlineAirdude66 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 2314 times:

This was not a hard landing....

More like a hard take-off !

They had to circle and land after they lost their ass.


User currently offlineUnattendedbag From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 2374 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (11 years 8 months 2 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 2137 times:

Beltway,

It's probably a bit more than cosmetic. There are probably aerodynamic factors involved too.

Da Man,

If you are talking about D. B. Cooper, it was a 727 and the rear airstairs were lowered on that flight.

TrnsWrld,

The FAA has listings of submitted aircraft and airport incidents but a specific date is not given. You would search all of 1987 if ya want... This incident may be to old to find through the FAA website.



Slower traffic, keep right
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