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Alledged Drunk Virgin Atlantic Pilot Arrested At IAD!  
User currently offlineStretch 8 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 2568 posts, RR: 16
Posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 7195 times:

WTTG (Fox) television in Washington, D.C., opened their 10:00 p.m. newscast with a story about the apparent arrest of a Virgin Atlantic pilot who was pulled off the regular VS (#22, I think) flight from IAD to LHR. 383 passengers are stranded at IAD. The pilot was exhibiting suspicious behavior, according to TSA. He was pulled from the 744, and the passengers were told that the airports authority police were summoned.


Maggs swings, it's a drive deep to left! The Tigers are going to the World Series!!!
34 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineAirways6max From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 494 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 7083 times:

Man oh man!

Thirteen years ago, I was flying an American Airline flight up from RDU to SYR. This was in August 1990, just days after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. There was a male flight attendant aboard. He seemed a bit odd--he was carrying a big red notebook and was wearing a three-piece suit. For much of the flight, he chatted with the people sitting in front of me for a VERY long time--seemed odd for a flight attendant. When I got off the plane in Syracuse, there was a police office waiting just outside, in the jetway. Again, this seemed odd. The next morning, when I picked up the newspaper, I learned that this flight attendant was a phony. He had donned the role so as to get a free flight with the airline. He got his free flight, but the police officer outside the plane was about to arrest him. The last I heard, he was taken to the Crowbar Hotel--aka, prison.


User currently offlinePilotNTrng From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 897 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 7049 times:

I tell ya, it's a shame that a pilot making that kind of money and having that very prestigious job would throw it all away over booze. Don't get me wrong I like to throw some beer back, but I know when to and when not to do it. What's the Aussie's regs on an incident like this? I know if the FAA catches wind of an American pilot being drunk while on duty you can kiss your ratings and license goodbye.


Booooo Lois, Yaaaa Beer!!!
User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 3, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6952 times:

I don´t know what caused this guy to drink before a flight, but I used know several alcoholic aircraft mechanics, only that they wouldn´t drink before going to work, but afterwards they would drink themselves stupid.
I know that the aircraft maintenance industry has one of the highest divorce rates in the world, mostly to do with us working crazy shifts, often at night, often abroad and on call. Additionally our salaries are quite good and often a spouse might think "if I don´t see him anyway I might just get a divorce, get my maintenance and get myself a new one." We are joking about suffering of "AIDS", means Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome.
I wonder if the same applies to pilots and F/A´s. A retired captain told me once that the only suitable wife for him turned out to be a F/A because she knew the business and wouldn´t be jealous everytime he had to stay in the same hotel as his female crew members.
Myself, I´m almost only working nights, the only day shifts I´ve got are on weekends. This means there is almost no social life possible because everybody else is fast asleep when I´m awake. This limits the contacts to colleagues, which gets a bit annoying after a while, because I don´t like to go boozing in a bar on my off days. In some places short term accomodation is so expensive (like in Ireland) that you are forced to share an apartment or house with several coworkers. I personaly don´t like to see the same faces every day at home I see the whole day along at work.
I keep this life up at the moment, but when my girlfriend and myself move together some day (we live and work in different countries), I´ll be probably looking for a new job that includes more regular shift time.

Jan


User currently offlinePiedmontGirl From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 1124 posts, RR: 13
Reply 4, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6893 times:

MD11Engineer:

" We are joking about suffering of "AIDS", means Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome.

I wonder if the same applies to pilots and F/A´s.


The same syndrome does apply to pilots and flight attendants. Both groups have extremely high divorce rates. The schedules are crazy and unpredictable, often being determined by the weather and/or broken airplane parts. It's very hard on marriage. It's very hard on relationships of any kind.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13968 posts, RR: 63
Reply 5, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6837 times:

PiedmontGirl,

If a plane goes AOG, I´ve got to stay on until I´ve at least troubleshot the problem and ordered spares. I had 20+ hour shifts, with being called at home a few hours later when the spares arrived. If there is bad weather at the destination we´ve got to wait until the plane takes off or the flight gets canceled because the crew runs out of hours. I wonder there are maximum duty hours with regulated rest periods in between for flying staff, but no regulation concerning maximum maintenance shifts. Everybody is talking about pilot´s fatique but I´ve heard nobody talk about bad maintenance through tired mechanics.

Jan


User currently offlineAA717driver From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1566 posts, RR: 13
Reply 6, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6773 times:

PilotNTng--Uh, VS is based in England, not Australia. I think you are thinking of Virgin Blue...TC


FL450, M.85
User currently offlinePiedmontGirl From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 1124 posts, RR: 13
Reply 7, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 6757 times:

MD11Engineer:

I wonder there are maximum duty hours with regulated rest periods in between for flying staff, but no regulation concerning maximum maintenance shifts.

There are federally mandated on duty and rest periods for both pilots and flight attendants in the US, and I would certainly think there would be in Germany also.

There should be some attention paid to mechanic fatigue. I've known mechanics to work double shifts day after day after day. I know one who is so tired he cannot drive home between them and just goes to one of the airport hotels for a few hours sleep. He's making really good money doing it, but he hates it, says it's not worth it, and would certainly prefer not to be so tired all the time. He's mentioned a couple of times checking and rechecking work -- I can understand why.


User currently offlineBobs89irocz From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 632 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6617 times:

I ride motorcycles with a mechanic the works 2 double shifts in a row....he gets his 40 hours done in 2 days......takes him a day to recuperate then hes a personal trainer for a couple days....makes AWSOME money but works hard. Guess thats how he can afford and Iron Hourse.....LOL...very nice bike.

Im not sure what the regulation is on mechanics, or if there is any on there work hours but there should be some sort of regulation made for them as well.


User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 6600 times:

Sad...but maddening, too. It's isolated cases like this that give the profession a black eye, and makes the flying public uneasy. There were also recent cases with America West and one other carrier.

Imagine having to explain to 383 passengers that they'll have to wait a day because the pilot was *allegedly* intoxicated. I'd be pretty pissed off, too.

Bad news for VS, because it's not like they have a monopoly on the route...they compete daily against their arch rival BA, but also vs. UA too. Wonder how many of those 383 people will think twice when booking their next transatlantic flight to/from LHR.


User currently offlineFlyingbronco05 From United States of America, joined May 2002, 3840 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 6501 times:

Here is the story from Yahoo:

http://biz.yahoo.com/rc/031219/airlines_pilot_1.html



Never Trust Your Fuel Gauge
User currently offlineUnited777 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 1657 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 6424 times:

I'm sure Sir Richard Branson will give him a raise now!

Farhan Ali
Seattle, USA


User currently offlineBartond From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 789 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 6371 times:

Hey Bobs89, I see what you're saying but I wouldn't (don't) want to fly on a plane that has been inspected/repaired by a guy that's been on call for 20+ straight hours. Period. That's like the stories you hear about doctors working for 36 straight hours and screwing some stuff up. Some study was done and it said after about 20 or so hours of straight work that a humans' motor skills start to diminish like he/she was downing beers. I think it said that a human that's up for 30 or so hours straight has the competency of someone who's had about 6-8 beers. Be it surgery on me or inspecting/repairing the plane I'm flying on, I don't want someone who's been up for a full day doing anything that technical.

User currently offlineCharliecossie From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 479 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 6319 times:

There's a little thing in the EU known as the European Work Time Directive.
It's law. It applies to all except "mobile" workers (pilots and cabin crew are classed as "mobile" and have separate legislation governing their duty hours) and any aircraft maintenance staff should familiarise themselves with it.
Those holding a JAR 66 licence should also famliarise themselves with the JAR Regulations regarding fitness for work.

For those outside the EU - the law demands a maximum of 16 hours on duty (and then minimum 10 hours off) and the JAR regs state that a licensed engineer/technician must not present himself for duty when unfit for said duty (includes tiredness).


User currently offlineA330 From Belgium, joined May 1999, 649 posts, RR: 7
Reply 14, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 6249 times:

IMPORTANT:

No accusations have been taken place. The only accusation of drunkenness has been made by the TSA, not exactly the most intelligent bunch of people...



Shiek!
User currently offlineNwfltattendant From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 341 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 6162 times:

This is very unfortunate and saddening. FIRST, I dont support him trying to fly (DUH). However this individual obviously has an alcohol problem that needs to get dealt with. Unfortunately it has come at the expense of his career and his ratings, hopefully just that. I am not making excuses and am pretty sure some turkeys in here are going to jump all over me for this post, but look at the absolute tragedy in this career, but thankfully it didnt become one for the carrier and 383+crew on board. The bottle claims another one.


Go yakkin !!!!!!
User currently offlineFritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 6083 times:

"Virgin pilot removed from Washington-London flight"

This is discrimination. Just because he was a virgin doesn't mean he cant fly the airplane safely!  Big thumbs up  Nuts


User currently offlineRichardw From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 3746 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 6029 times:

BBC news are using old film of a VS 747 taking off with lots of BA planes in old livery!

User currently offlineLu From China, joined Aug 1999, 175 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5916 times:

Fritzi
U mind VIRGIN very much!!! HA HA HA


User currently offlineFritzi From United Arab Emirates, joined Jun 2001, 2762 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5901 times:

Lu,

could you rephrase that,
Im having a little trouble understanding your reply.


User currently offlineRayChuang From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 7991 posts, RR: 5
Reply 20, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 5730 times:

Here's the question: will that flight finally take off today with a replacement flight crew? Will we see the possibility of two VS 747-400's parked side-by-side at IAD?

User currently offlineCrewrest From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 93 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 5702 times:

RayChuang: I suspect that isn't anyone's priority right now.


User currently offlineBruce From United States of America, joined May 1999, 5047 posts, RR: 15
Reply 22, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 5544 times:

I suspect that this is not the first time this has happend. just means this was the first time he was CAUGHT.

BTW,
I love the headline "Virgin pilot removed from Washington-London flight" made my day!  Big grin


bruce



Bruce Leibowitz - Jackson, MS (KJAN) - Canon 50D/100-400L IS lens
User currently offlineBen2881 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 12 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 5455 times:

just a quick question maybe somebody can help me out with. are pilots allowed to fly at all after drinking. i.e. one can drive a car if his blood alchohol is below a certain level. is this the same for pilots or is there zero tolerance.

User currently offlineRiverVisualNYC From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 930 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (10 years 7 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 5391 times:

He's apparently an American living in the UK, interesting because I thought the bottle to throttle had mainly been a problem with British pilots, different cultural attitude towards alcohol and such...Anyway, I am glad to see VS is sticking up for their employee in the absence of any real evidence so far. Most US airlines would be trying to find a way to fire the guy before they even gave him the breathalyzer test..

25 Crewrest : Ben2881 From the UK CAA safety site. The “prescribed limit” for a maintenance engineer is the same as for a driver on the road, at 80 mill
26 N1120A : This has happened plenty of times with airlines from everywhere (including the US). I have no idea why these pilots are so stupid about this. I really
27 Stretch 8 : The accused spent the weekend in the Loudoun County (Virginia) jail, and will be arranged this morning in General District Court in Leesburg, VA. The
28 GDB : He is 55 too, so about to retire presumably, messed that up hasn't he?
29 SRD737NG : Stretch 8- Size of the plane doesn't matter. There are people flying King Air's that have big D...syndrome. As far as authority to relieve a Capt. of
30 RiverVisualNYC : Has it occurred to anyone that maybe the "big d--k syndrome" is with the TSA former rent a cops, that increasingly like to show who is the boss now? I
31 MD-90 : Hang on. This incident could possibly be a serious mistake. What if the pilot had a cold and took cold medicine that has alcohol in it? The TSA agent
32 PiedmontGirl : MD-90: I would depend on his blood alcohol level. In the US a blood alcohol level of .04 or above is grounds for arresting a pilot. .04 qualifies as d
33 TOLtommy : Because it is against the law to operate an aircraft under the influence, that's why. Perhaps it was cold medicine, but it is still the pilots respons
34 Post contains links PiedmontGirl : TOLtommy: He would have a whale of a time getting to .04 with Vick's NyQuil or any similar product. I strongly suspect that NyQuil is not the culprit
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