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Pilot Pit Stops  
User currently offlineUltrapig From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 581 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2684 times:

I was on an AA flight DFW-STL in first class last night. I noted that half an hour into the flight a pilot used the lav and when he came out a FA went into the cockpit. My seatmate and I guessed that this was a protocol which involved the FA opening the door from the inside when the Pilot was done with the Lav. Leaving his fellow pilot to fly without distraction. My seatmate also noticed that the door seemed to have a keyhole which didn't make sense since since a terrorist could demand someone give him the key.

I was surprised that the Pilot had to use the facility on such a short flight.

Is my theory correct.?

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineXJRamper From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2460 posts, RR: 51
Reply 1, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 2626 times:

When I was on my first leg from TOL-ATL this same thing happened on this flight. The FO went to use the restroom and the FA went into the cockpit. And when the FO returned, the FA went back into the cabin. You mentioned that the door had a key. This door did not, but then again it was 6 in the morning; I was barely awake and I might have missed it.  Big thumbs up Anywho, my .02

XJR



Look ma' no hands!
User currently offlinePER744 From Australia, joined Mar 2003, 405 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2464 times:

Different airlines seem to use different procedures. On TZ I have seen a few times that when the Captain or FO uses the restroom that the cockpit door is propped open, however at least 2 FA's block the aisle with a cart.



User currently offlineTriJetFan1 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1128 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2418 times:
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Wait,I thought that the airline pilots in the US are suppose to keep their doors closed no matter what. I am not sure, but is there a lav that is accessable to pilots without opening the cockpit door?


Earned PPL June 26, 2007
User currently offlineJeffM From United States of America, joined May 2005, 3266 posts, RR: 52
Reply 4, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2405 times:

NO.

There isn't

 Big grin


User currently offlineJbmitt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 547 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2403 times:

TriJetFan1,

I know that you are new here, and somebody got on your case today..so I'm going to be easy.

You're right about the law..however, there aren't lavatories specifically for the pilots or flight crews. That would be a waste of crucial space.


jbmitt


User currently offlineTriJetFan1 From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1128 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 2381 times:
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Jbmitt- Sorry and who got on my case today?


Earned PPL June 26, 2007
User currently offlineLearjet23 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2209 times:

FAA And TSA rules now state that a pilot must reduce true airspeed to a level whereupon he can position himself in the seat, to piss out the window in a safe and non hazardous manner.

User currently offline7574EVER From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 478 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2198 times:

LOL....Very funny Learjet23.  Laugh out loud


Right rudder....Right rudder...Come on, more right rudder....Right rudder......Aw forget it, I quit!!
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2192 times:

Hmm I noticed that to on a flight from Cleveland to ISP, I figured the FA was going into to the cockpit to perform some unofficial duties if you get my drift.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Can someone please tell me what the official ruling is on this behavior?

Boy am I jaded!!  Innocent


User currently offline7574EVER From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 478 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2174 times:

"I figured the FA was going into to the cockpit to perform some unofficial duties if you get my drift." - NIKV69

No, actually I don't get your drift. Would you mind giving us a full explanation?  Big grin

[Edited 2004-02-05 06:47:19]


Right rudder....Right rudder...Come on, more right rudder....Right rudder......Aw forget it, I quit!!
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2162 times:

Well I would but it would not be in good taste so I will pass. I am curious as to why the FA entered the cockpit, any body know why this practice is used when a pilot leaves the cockpit?

User currently offlineSwacle From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 373 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2143 times:

Learjet23--

What if the pilot has diarrhea? Do standard "drop and hang" procedures apply?

Don



Aircraft Flown: SF3 DH8 DH4 328 ERJ CRJ CR7 CR9 E70 E75 D9S M80 712 72S 732 733 734 735 73G 738 739 739ER 752 318 319 32
User currently offline7574EVER From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 478 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2144 times:

NIKV69,
I was just joking of course......In answer to your question, it is to my understanding that the door must be completely closed if a pilot leaves the cockpit to use the facilities or flirt with the FA's. So an FA will go into the cockpit to open the door for the pilot when he returns. This allows the pilot still in the cockpit to remain seated and continue flying the plane instead of having to open the door. Don't quote me but this is what I've been told. Perhaps someone can prove, disprove, or elaborate on this statement.

[Edited 2004-02-05 06:57:24]


Right rudder....Right rudder...Come on, more right rudder....Right rudder......Aw forget it, I quit!!
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2130 times:

I knew you were kidding  Big grin

That makes sense, thank you.


User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 15, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 2114 times:

Lear23

With regard to the procedure you discuss in post #7 let me tell you that it does not work all that well.

First time I tried a damn B-52 came up and tried to refuel on me!



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6202 posts, RR: 12
Reply 16, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days ago) and read 2057 times:

The process of having the pilot leave the cockpit to use the restroom is rather complicated; therefore, they usually try to take care of restroom needs on the ground prior to flight. If they must go, then they must implement the complicated procedures.


Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineJahckass From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 143 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 1951 times:

i like the idea of having a fa enter the cockpit while a pilot is in the cabin. im guessing in some cockpits it is possible for a pilot to reach back and open a door while seated in his/her position however it is not possible for him/her to look through the peep hole while remaining at the controls. if s/he were to get up to look out the peephole then open the door, there is a greater chance that s/he could end up in the cabin and nobody in the cockpit (which could be bad if the door closes behind them). to sum up, two people in the cockpit at all times makes it harder to end up with no one in the cockpit.

User currently offlineRick767 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 2662 posts, RR: 51
Reply 18, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 1932 times:

"If they must go, then they must implement the complicated procedures."

All sounds a bit drastic... when I need to go, I just go!



I used to love the smell of Jet-A in the morning...
User currently offlineSlamClick From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 10062 posts, RR: 68
Reply 19, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 1852 times:

And it is those "complicated procedures" that justify our huge salaries.



Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
User currently offlineFlymia From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 7119 posts, RR: 9
Reply 20, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 1708 times:

I think the only reason for the FA to go in the cockpit is incase something happens to the other pilot in the Cockpit. Saw them do this Twice once the FO and once the Captain. Did not notice if there was a key or not. But in the AA 757 i know when the Cockpit door opens the light up front turns off. Very good thinking. But i think they did this before 9-11


"It was just four of us on the flight deck, trying to do our job" (Captain Al Haynes)
User currently offlineLearjet23 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 1685 times:

What if a really fine hooters type F/A would just hold a bed pan to the pilots schlong while he kept his hands on the wheel? That way there would be no interruption and the F/A's could keep a record of who had the "heavy equipment"

User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5126 posts, RR: 34
Reply 22, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 1588 times:

With regards to the key hole: Perhaps this is to allow the door to be locked when noone is on board the aircraft. this would stop anyone boarding an unatended ac at a gate and accessing the cockpit. Once the pilots are in the cockpit I would imagine there would be a second lock that can only be accessed from inside the cockpit.

With regards to the FA entering the cockpit, it could be for any of the following reasons:

1) To open the door to allow the pilot back in
2) To monitor the remaining member of staff incase he has a heart attack. They can then open the door and alert the other member of flight crew
3) To provide an extra body in the event a terrorist tries to gain access when the pilot is in the loo...

Well theres a few reasons, im sure there are many more!



That'll teach you
User currently offlineBUCKY707 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1028 posts, RR: 3
Reply 23, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 1511 times:

the reason a F/A goes into the cockpit is a change in the rules regarding cockpit entry. Someone has to visually verify that the person about to enter the cockpit is indeed who they say they are. With one pilot out of the cockpit making a pit stop, it is impossible for the other to get up and look out the peep hole and make this verification without leaving his duty station. So the F/A has to go into the cockpit to check when the other pilot is ready to come back.

User currently offlineAhsanf28 From Bangladesh, joined Mar 2002, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1346 times:

7574EVER is absolutely right. In many airlines the policy is to keep the cockpit door closed at all times. So when one of the cockpit crew members comes out of the cockpit a flight attendant must enter the cockpit to lock it from inside and then subsequently open it again when the crew returns.

User currently offlineUa777222 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 3348 posts, RR: 11
Reply 25, posted (10 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1307 times:

I know b/c my dad is a pilot and from observations that if a pilot has to go to the lav that they will most likely go when they too are being served food. This happens when the entire A/C is being fed. When this happens there are carts in the aisle and as all of us know its a bitch to get through one of those. On all of the UAL flights I've flown First they use the cart in fornt of the door even when it's shut and the pilot is in the lav. It makes a lot more sense to do this b/c most people are sitting, the aisles are blocked and you open the cockpit door as minimal as possible. IM NOT SAYING THAT THIS IS WHAT THEY DO BY THE BOOK (for those of us out there that will yell at me for giving out "security" procedures)THIS IS JUST WHAT I'VE SEEN.


UA777222



"It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark."
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