Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Aviation fuel  
User currently offlineGopal From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 113 posts, RR: 0
Posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 888 times:

Is aviation very similar to Kerosene in its composition? Does it have a higher calorific value than gasoline (petrol). Why is more suitable for turbofans than gasoline?

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineC-GMWW From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 885 times:

Jet fuel is Kersene. I think it has a very high octane rating compard to regular gasoline. Therefore producing more power.

User currently offlineBryanG From United States of America, joined May 1999, 436 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 887 times:

Chemically, kerosene and jet fuel are the same. When they distill petorleum at the refinery, jet fuels are collected just before gasolines. The kerosenes are more dense than gasoline (gasolines have 5-11 carbon atoms per molecule, kerosenes have 9-16 carbon atoms per molecule). The kerosenes have a much higher octane, allowing them to burn slower than gasoline. In the jet engine, the fuel burns to accelerate air out the back and produce thrust. Fast-burning fuels like gasoline would waste most of their energy in the jet, beause they would just vaporize when they were ignited and wouldn't create a lot of force.
Force = mass x acceleration, so if a drop of gas takes longer to burn it has more opportunity to accelerate air throught the jet - the force of the thrust increases. I don't know if a jet can run on regular gasoline or not (I doubt it), but if it could it would basically just burn quickly to produce a lot of heat and noise without moving much air out the back of the engine.


User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 3, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 885 times:

Jet engines can burn av gas and can be used when Jet is not available.

User currently offlinespud From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2011, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 885 times:

Turbine fuel and Kero are similar. But kero lacks the additives and purity of Jet. It does not have a higher octane, you cant measure it in that value. You CANNOT use av gas in a turbine. after a very short time you would have a very expensive puddle of metal. But you can use diesel fuel in an emergency at an increased maintance cost and less performance.

User currently offlineGopal From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 113 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 885 times:

Thanks Guys, for the informative answers.

User currently offlineJETPILOT From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3130 posts, RR: 29
Reply 6, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 885 times:

Jet engines CAN burn AV gas. If you want proof open up a King air or 1900 AOM and read it in black and white.

User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29813 posts, RR: 58
Reply 7, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 885 times:

There are some turbine engines that are specificly designed for AV-Gas. Specificly some of the turbine booster engines that where used on the B-36, C-119, KB-50, C-123, KC-97. Usually these were military aircraft that had high operating weights. The booster turbines on the C-123K are actually the same J-85 that are used of the F-5 fighter. Just a different series number. Most aviation turbines can still use av-gas as long as certain operating peramaters and conditions are met. If you exceed them then you do toast the engine.

All Kerosenes have about the same charicteristics. Doesn't matter if it is Home heating oil, Kerosene, JP-8, Diesel #1, Diesel #2, Jet A. The main differences are the amount of filtering, The amount of wax, and the amount of Water that is present in the fuel. Military JP-4 was about the only unique fuel because it was a mix of Kerosene and avgas. It has since been replaced by JP-8 since it was a very sparky mix.

Interestly enough when the US Navy first put jet fighters on Carriers they where really worried about having to stock two types of fuel onboard the ships (Av-gas and Jet-Fuel) then somebody found out you could make a pretty decent jet fuel by thining the Bunker C fuel that powered the ships boilers with the Av-gas that the Corsiar and Skyraider ground attack aircraft needed.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineAntonov From Croatia, joined Jun 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (15 years 8 months 3 weeks 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 885 times:

Wow ! I would prefer more posts like these then all the "what's your favourite this or what do you think is the most that"-stuff on the forum !
That was veeeeeeery interesting !!


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Pinnacle Oil Aviation Fuel Worldwide Anyone? posted Thu Aug 18 2005 14:24:11 by CHRISBA777ER
Allied Aviation Fuel At JFK Strike? posted Thu Jun 30 2005 21:20:43 by Jetblue15
Tax on aviation fuel? posted Wed May 4 2005 17:26:27 by Glom
Aviation Fuel Tax For EU Domestic Flights? posted Tue Mar 22 2005 19:37:17 by Arniepie
EU Proposes Tax On Aviation Fuel posted Mon Feb 14 2005 07:14:39 by Scotron11
Aviation Fuel Conversion posted Sun Feb 1 2004 23:12:00 by Cleco
Dominican Republic Aviation Fuel Crisis posted Mon Jan 12 2004 15:58:22 by LatinAviation
Cost Of Aviation Fuel posted Thu Sep 4 2003 09:16:06 by MaxedOut
EU Want To Tax Aviation Fuel For Passenger Flights posted Fri Mar 10 2000 19:42:31 by Dstc47
Aviation Fuel Contamination In Australia! posted Tue Jan 11 2000 21:23:04 by Pandora