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A380 Wings In Toulouse!  
User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1110 posts, RR: 1
Posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 3774 times:

It looks like everything is ready in Toulouse for the first assembly, after the three pieces of the fuselage, the first wings have arrived with "God save the Queen" playing in the assembly hall!
----------------------------------------------------------------
SAYS AIRBUS:
Wings arrive at Lagardère assembly hall in Toulouse
“God Save The Queen” rang out through Toulouse’ Jean-Luc Lagardère assembly hall as the first A380 set of wings arrived at their final destination.
Designed and built in Airbus’ UK plants, the wings arrived just after midnight on 23 April 2004 after a three-day journey on the road between Langon and Toulouse. They were unloaded and transferred to the assembly hall where work on joining them to the central fuselage began immediately. The 45m long, 12m high wings will form part of the A380 static test aircraft.
---------------------------------------------------------------
What are these static tests about? Will we see a complete aircraft on its wheels? Will there be a roll out, even if the plane will not ever fly? If so, we'll see the beast fairly soon! Even if there is no roll out, they'll have to move it around Toulouse to static tests facility.

I don't recall having seen a first 747 that never flew. Isn't it odd to use the first prototype for static tests? Is it the rule? What's the history on this, at airbus but also at boeing or any other manufacturer? Anyone?

You can see the pics of the wings in the assembly hall here: http://www.airbus.com/airbus4u/photo_album.asp

[Edited 2004-04-23 21:17:09]

[Edited 2004-04-23 21:25:25]

21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePlaneMad From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2003, 533 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 3662 times:

I can't wait for this plane!

User currently offlineRuscoe From Australia, joined Aug 1999, 1561 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3541 times:

I think the static test plane is tested to destruction, hence no flying. aso unlikely it will ever be painted.
I think it is fairly routine to test the first of a new model this way. I remember seing a video of the 777 static test craft having its wing bent until it snapped.
I suppose they have to get confirm the engineers got the calculatons correct.

Ruscoe


User currently offlineRoberta From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3517 times:

What are the engine options on the A380, RR and ?

Edit: actually i've just found out, its GE and RR.

[Edited 2004-04-23 22:40:35]

User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3478 times:

PW/GE have joined to make the "alliance" engine. GP 7000 family.

The first few planes will be RR. Trent 900.



[Edited 2004-04-23 22:44:50]

[Edited 2004-04-23 22:46:48]

User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 970 posts, RR: 51
Reply 5, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3351 times:

I remember seing a video of the 777 static test craft having its wing bent until it snapped.

As far as I know, the very first 777 is in service with United-


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Konstantin von Wedelstaedt



Maybe an individual wing was snapped, but Boeing has never tested an entire airframe to destruction that I know of.


User currently offlineGREATANSETT From Australia, joined Aug 2003, 508 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3310 times:

The A340 was tested until the wings snapped. And just because UA had the first 777 in the world in commercial use it does not mean it was the first created ever. Many would on been created for testing reasons.  Big thumbs up


Ron Paul 2012
User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 970 posts, RR: 51
Reply 7, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3266 times:

And just because UA had the first 777 in the world in commercial use it does not mean it was the first created ever.

Very true, but in this case.. UA does indeed opperate the first 777 built.


User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3250 times:

That's amazing. I thought they would keep the first flying airplane. Like they did for the first 747 (I think). It's pretty impressive to have the first prototype good enough to be put on line.

User currently onlineCadmus From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 185 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3248 times:

Boeing built 2 static test airframes for the 777. One of these had the wings snapped off in January 1995 (they were pulled 24ft above their normal position at the time).
This comes from 'Boeing 777' by Bruce Campion-Smith (ISBN 0711025045)



Understanding is a three-edged sword
User currently offlineGreatansett From Australia, joined Aug 2003, 508 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3246 times:

But wouldn't Boeing of built test aircraft which were never intended to enter service?


Ron Paul 2012
User currently offlineAvObserver From United States of America, joined Apr 2002, 2472 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 3245 times:

"Very true, but in this case.. UA does indeed opperate the first 777 built."

DfwRevolution, don't you mean the first PRODUCTION 777 built. Doesn't Boeing still own the original prototype aircraft first shown in April, 1994?


User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4537 posts, RR: 41
Reply 12, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3080 times:

AvObserver - the original prototype was reengined with RRs and sold to Cathay Pacific a few years ago.

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 970 posts, RR: 51
Reply 13, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days 1 hour ago) and read 3005 times:

AvObserver - the original prototype was reengined with RRs and sold to Cathay Pacific a few years ago.

I'm very confused with my 777 history now  Nuts... I'll go reread some old books later.

Boeing built 2 static test airframes for the 777. One of these had the wings snapped off in January 1995 (they were pulled 24ft above their normal position at the time).

I thought these were just structural test frames? As in no systems, no wiring, no engines; only critical airframe components like wings, wingbox, ext.


User currently offlineMD11LuxuryLinr From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 1385 posts, RR: 14
Reply 14, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 3 days ago) and read 2931 times:

UA was the first to operate the 777. It was N777UA. Tee FIRST production 777 (Line #1) was N7771 (Boeing registration) and now belongs to CX as B-HNL. It was delivered to them in Dec of 2000.


Caution wake turbulence, you are following a heavy jet.
User currently offlineN754pr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2804 times:

Correct, Cathay Pacific operates 777 line number 1.

User currently offlineLMML 14/32 From Malta, joined Jan 2001, 2565 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2661 times:

I am going to Airbus next week. Perhaps I will be lucky to see the 380 pieces somewhere.

User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1110 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2371 times:

I've done their factory tour (been to boeing too!) and it's on the other side of the airport from the A380 site. I doubt you'll see anything. Sorry.

User currently offlineGeizistgeil From Germany, joined Apr 2004, 149 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2270 times:

I just started reading a book about history of the jumbo, called "Boeing 747 - design and development since 1969" and it says:

"The third and sixth structurally complete 747s never flew but became the static- and fatigue-test airframes, respectively". Static, or "torture", testing began in early 1969 with the airframe being pulled, twisted, and stretched to see if anything "gave".
Finally, in Feb 1979, the starboard wing was deflected upwards 29 feet and snapped when stresses reached 116.7 percent of ultimate design load. [...] The fatigue airframe, located in an outdoor rig, began simulated flight cycles at the beginning of 1970"

Cheers





"If the Wright brothers were alive today. Wilbur would have to fire Orville to reduce costs" (H. Kelleher)
User currently offlineJaspike From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2008, 1 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2245 times:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Pierre-Clément Got



Huge wings  Smile

Tom


User currently offlineMexicana757 From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 3041 posts, RR: 28
Reply 20, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2205 times:

Can't wait to see the finished product. By when will the A380 be assembled? I just want to see it take off. See something so huge go up in the air.

User currently onlineCadmus From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 185 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 2201 times:

I thought these were just structural test frames? As in no systems, no wiring, no engines; only critical airframe components like wings, wingbox, ext.

The book I was referencing only refers to two 'airframes' taken from the production line. Engines are specified as absent. The photo shows a complete fuselage with wings and vertical tail attached. There is no horizontal tail, and no sign of any movable surfaces being fitted.
The systems of the 777 were tested both individually and all together in the 'Integrated Aircraft Systems Laboratory', a three storey, $360 million centre also known as 'Airplane Zero'.



Understanding is a three-edged sword
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