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First 757 To Be Broken Up  
User currently offlineCol From Malaysia, joined Nov 2003, 2106 posts, RR: 22
Posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 10627 times:

Just read on speednews that a 757 will be broken up, and it is not damaged. Anyone got more info, as this is a little surprising.

43 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineN2111J From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 148 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 10501 times:

I don't have any info on this particular aircreaft, however, in general, anyone who breaks up a commercial airliner should be drawn and quartered! lol

User currently offlineA340600 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2003, 4105 posts, RR: 51
Reply 2, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 10341 times:

Nooooooooooooooooooooooo, I suppose some of them were built in the early 80's: Smile Smile(

Sam Sad



Despite the name I am a Boeing man through and through!
User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 10211 times:

I doubt that it will be the ex-TWA PW-powered birds that American got rid of (at least, I hope not). They are fairly new, compared to the 767-200's that met a similar fate.

User currently offlineCol From Malaysia, joined Nov 2003, 2106 posts, RR: 22
Reply 4, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 10159 times:

All the early birds went to BA and EA. The BA are now FR, could it be an early EA unit which then ended up being hammered by a UK Charter Airline.

User currently offlineNa From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10679 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 10140 times:

The 767 and the 757 were both intoduced in the early 80s, the oldest examples are 22 years old. Several 767s were already scrapped and dozens more are on the list, having been retired forever (Ansett, Air NZ, UA, AA, Air Canada, Delta...).
So why wonder a old 757 has come to its end as well? I find it even surprising that some 757s, having more cycles on the clock as 767s of the same age because of its lesser range, have not been cut up before the first 767s.


User currently offlineCol From Malaysia, joined Nov 2003, 2106 posts, RR: 22
Reply 6, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9979 times:

The BA 757 must have had most cycles from the shuttle operation. These units found homes as FR. With the older 72F/DC8, the 757 must be favorable to operate, their second hand costs must be getting lower.

User currently offlineBlackbird1331 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1893 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9798 times:

Maybe this one failed the fatigue test and was not worth saving. I landed twice on two different aircraft, they both landed "hard" in my opinion. Does that shorten its life? I would think so. Any 757 drivers reading this?


Cameras shoot pictures. Guns shoot people. They have the guns.
User currently onlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 17424 posts, RR: 46
Reply 8, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9780 times:

FR?


Obviously not Ryanair...



E pur si muove -Galileo
User currently offlineRepaulson From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 103 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9735 times:

I thought US airways got the EA 757s... EA ran them into the ground!

User currently offlineFlynavy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9672 times:

Landing "hard" in your opinion, and an actual "hard" landing are, of course, two different things. In the Hornet, for instance, there are air frame stress sensors/probes throughout the aircraft. If one of these sensors records airframe stress amounts above the acceptable threshold, it immediately alerts the pilot and/or maintenance crew. Multiple inspections are required. This most certainly stresses, or "ages" the airframe.

User currently offlineFlyguyclt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Reply 11, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9635 times:

Repaulson:

USAirways did get some of the EA 757's. From what I have been told by USAirways crews is that when EA shut down. The planes went straight to the desert. With food carts and lavs not serviced. So when USAirways finally got them. Needless to say they were very ripe for awhile. Some EA birds also went to European Charters. Years ago in the Caribbean a 757 Charter crashed in the water on take off. From what I remember that was a former EA 757. If my facts are correct. EA had a total of 25 757's at one time. The first delivery being 1983. Gee I am getting old.

Safe Travels All  Smile



Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
User currently offlineHa763 From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 3655 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9575 times:
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FR=Freighters. The BA 757s went to DHL IIRC.

User currently offlineBlackbird1331 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1893 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9487 times:

Flynavy:

Let me rephrase. Of all the commercial jets I have been on, the 757 seemed to land harder than the others. Maybe they were built for that. I always thought they had great legs.


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Cameras shoot pictures. Guns shoot people. They have the guns.
User currently offlineN102daman From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 155 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9414 times:

Too bad. The 757 is indeed a great aircraft. Will see it in service for many many years to come but always hate to loose one.


"Fly Widget Fly"
"Keep Singing Song"



"Service and Hospitality from the Heart." (C. E. Woolman, Delta airlines first CEO and founder.)
User currently offlineAloha717200 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 4479 posts, RR: 15
Reply 15, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9408 times:

I thought there would be more time before the first 757 would be broken up.  Sad


For a while I've actually been dreading the day the first 757 would meet it's fate, guess that wait is over. None of them seem old to me at all, but then again when the 727 was still flying regularly in the USA, I didn't find that plane old either. So sad that aircraft have only 20-30 years of life in them before they have to be retired.

Can you find out the reg # of this plane?


User currently offlineTrnsWrld From United States of America, joined May 1999, 925 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 9381 times:

To whoever made the comment about the TWA 75's...Ummm those were all acquired brand new in late 90's.

User currently offlineGreg From United Kingdom, joined May 2005, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 9243 times:

I am somewhat stumped by the 'greatness' of the 757 considering it:

1. out of production quicker than any other Boeing jet...
2. still has competitors that have a backorder for basically the same type of aircraft (A321).
3. is being replaced by a design that is essentially at least 15 years older....(737-900).

It's well and good to say how well it's climb performance was---but how successful can it be judged if it's production has been terminated only two years after a derivative launched (753).

Not a slam...it's just interesting...


User currently offlineCloudy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8919 times:

The 757, and soon the 767 as well, are going out because of the 7E7. The 737-900 did cut into sales but the 7E7 program is the real reason it is going out of production.

User currently offlineLVZXV From Gabon, joined Mar 2004, 2041 posts, RR: 37
Reply 19, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 8840 times:

Greg:

3 points about the 757:

1. By the time 757 production closes in late 2004, the aircraft will have been produced for 22 years. Interestingly, Boeing's #2 best seller, the 727, was produced for 21 (1963-84), so your first point is incorrect. The 757-300 was an unmitigated flop, true, but some aircraft are intended for very small markets are due from the start to attract few customers, as was the case with the 747SP and 767-400.
2. The 757 is a twin to the 767. One cannot consider one without considering the other, as the programme was joint and the two aircraft made their first flights only a year apart. The same goes for the A330/A340 family.
3. In all fairness, the Tu-204 has more in common with the 757 than the A321. Not only does the A321 offer an inferior seating capacity and shorter range, but the type doesn't have the rough field performance of the 757 primarily due to shorter undercarriage and 2-wheel MLG bogies. Although the A321 has sold in the region of 600 in its 9 years of service, I think had Airbus adopted 4-wheel MLG bogies and extra fuel capacity they would have sold many more.

XV




How do you say "12 months" in Estonian?
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 20, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8724 times:

I am somewhat stumped by the 'greatness' of the 757 considering it:

1. out of production quicker than any other Boeing jet...


WAAAAAY wrong......!!!! I think the 747SP has that title.

My quick math has the 720 second, followed by the 707 at just shy of 20 years......Excluding Military Orders

Next to the 727, the 757 is one of the finest Boeings every built..just ask anyone that fly it.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineDutchjet From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 7864 posts, RR: 57
Reply 21, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8581 times:

The 757 is one of the finest airliners ever built and developed......name another type that can fly from New York to Europe one day and shuttle between New York and Boston the next.....and do each type of mission (and everything inbetween) economically and produce a profit for the airline; the 757 is one of the most versatile airliners around. A run of 22 years and nearly 1100 copies sold is solid evidence of its success. The 753 was simply the wrong aircraft at the wrong time, it offered extra capacity just when the airlines were looking to cut back - the 753 is the most economical way to move about 225 passengers between 2 cities that are 500-2500 miles apart, the problem was filing 225 seats on a route when airlines are far more interested in frequency and making their hubs work, shame.

However, all good things must come to an end, it was a sad day when the last 727 was built and the same will be true when the last 757 rolls down the line later this year.




User currently offlineN9801F From Samoa, joined Apr 2004, 332 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8562 times:

Blackbird1331:

More so than the 757, the DC-8 always seemed to me to land remarkably hard.

It had no leading edge slats, so it descended nose down until what seemed like the last minute, then flare, and BAM!


User currently offlineAloha717200 From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 4479 posts, RR: 15
Reply 23, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8510 times:

A completely misguided statement, Greg.

1. out of production quicker than any other Boeing jet...

I don't think so. I think the respondent above has it with the 747SP. The 757 has been in production for 22 years!



2. still has competitors that have a backorder for basically the same type of aircraft (A321).

The A321 is NOT the same type of aircraft. While the pax capacity may be similar, the 321 is designed for short-haul. the 757 was designed for trans-con. Similar sized planes, entirely different jobs.


3. is being replaced by a design that is essentially at least 15 years older....(737-900).


Two incorrect statements in one sentence. First, the 739 is an entirely new airplane. New wing, cockpit, systems, engines, everything. The only thing similar is that it has a similar fuselage design.

Next, the 739 does not replace the 757. Firstly, it also is designed for short-haul, though some airlines push the limits of its range. Next, the pax capacity doesn't match the 757. You know what the 739 competes with? The A321. Not the 757. The 739X was the proposed 752 replacement, but with the 7e7 out now, boeing may likely terminate the 739X plan, and go with a 7e7 hybrid instead.


how successful can it be judged if it's production has been terminated only two years after a derivative launched (753).


Was the DC-9 successful? By your logic, the 717 would be the same as a DC-9 because it looks the same and has a similar design. The 717 hasn't sold well, so does that mean the whole DC-9 family was a failure?

Here's a better example.

The 767 will be out of production soon. The 764, launched only a few years back, has had only two customers. Does this mean the entire 767 family is a failure? OR that one particular design just didn't make it in today's market?


The 747SP was a failure...does that mean that the entire 747 line was a failure too?

See, bad logic. You say the 757 program was not a success, because the 753 didn't garner enough orders to keep the line open. By that logic, Boeing's entire jetliner family has been just one big failure after another.

[Edited 2004-05-12 02:11:55]

User currently offlineBeechNut From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 724 posts, RR: 10
Reply 24, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 8384 times:

Re: firm landings. As passengers we tend to judge landings on their gentleness.

Pilots on the other hand will tell you that crosswinds, contaminated runways and short runways all dictate firm landings: better control in crosswinds when all wheels are in contact with terra firma; less hydroplaning on contaminated runways, and more rapid full braking on short runways.

The passenger cabin is the worst place from which to rate a landing. When I'm in a plane that lands hard, but see the windsock pointing across the runway and looking like it's had a recent dose of Viagra, I want to congratulate the crew for their airmanship.

One airline pilot in fact once told me that Boeing encourages firm landings from a safety standpoint.

Mike
C-GTLM


25 Blackbird1331 : Thank you for the input, guys. I will then move on to my second theroy. Airbus owns the plane.
26 Geg2rap : haha...that is really funny...so if boeing gets SIA's a345's are the going to the chopping block at retribution?
27 Tbear815 : Two things I'd like to add - Boeing simultaneously produced the 707 and 720. And, some of the "loser" models gave way to very successful designs. The
28 Greg : No...I don't think I'm wrong at all. 1. the 747SP was a derivative..and the 747 is still in production. Same for the 720.....sorry guys. 2. Airbus and
29 LVZXV : Greg: One thing you are forgetting is that the 757-200, as a variant, as been in production dor longer than any other Boeing variant--check the 707, 7
30 Post contains images RayChuang : I'm surprised it took them this long to finally scrap an end-of-useful life 757 for parts! Fortunately, most of the parts will be recycled and used on
31 Udo : The latest 93 MGTOW version of the A321-200 can fly trans continental missions well, US Airways has been doing that for some years. And in most cases
32 Col : Stirred up a lot of issues with my post!! It is a sad year for the 757. Now my concern is where the 767 will end up, the order book is low, and now th
33 EAL757 : re: the design of the 737 being some 15 years older...when it comes to fuselage, it's even older than that. The 737 fuselage is essentially the same a
34 Stefandotde : Cloudy: " ... but the 7E7 program is the real reason it is going out of production." You think so? I think the planes (757 and 767) will not be sold a
35 Greg : Once again, I'll go by what Aviation Week and Flight International say long before I'll take the would of aviation 'enthusiasts' on a forum. My origin
36 EAL757 : I just don't see the 7E7 as a true replacement for the 75 right now...I think they can co-exist in a fleet quite easily. Won't the 7E7 be very expensi
37 Spacepope : Who really cares whether the 7e7 is a replacement or not? What I really want to know about this is: Airframe c/n Cycles Hours Corrosion problems? Ther
38 Post contains images AirframeAS : Of all the commercial jets I have been on, the 757 seemed to land harder than the others. Maybe they were built for that. I always thought they had gr
39 Mtkinf : Greg, Throwing out some names of magazines does not automatically make any of your points more or less legitimate or correct. As some have pointed out
40 Post contains links and images Titch : Just in case anybody was wondering about the identity of the 757 in question, it's being reported as EC-HQV (c/n 23118), ex-LTE/Volare, and had comple
41 CKT523 : when was this airframe delivered?
42 Titch : I believe that it entered service with LTS as D-AMUR on May 25th 1984.
43 Col : Titch, Thanks for bringing some sense and reality back to this question.
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