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What Do All The Different Cabin Class Letters Mean  
User currently offlineScottishLaddie From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 2384 posts, RR: 8
Posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 30915 times:

For example,

Cabin class: J4 D3 Z2 Y9 H9 K9 N9 B9 V0 U0 Q0 I0 S0 W0 T0 X0 L0

What do all the different cabin class letters mean? And the numbers, are they simply the seats remaining on the flight?
I would be grateful if someone who knows could tell me.  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

Also, I don't know how much this matters but the letters and classes in the example above are from CO.


[Edited 2004-05-29 23:50:11]

27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDutchjet From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 7864 posts, RR: 57
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30749 times:

The different letters are fare classes - and determines how much you will pay for your flight. In your example, J, D and likely Z are seats in the business class cabin....J is the usual designator for full fare business, D is discounted business, Z is another variation. The other letters are all economy class fares, Y is full fare economy and likely H being the highest discounted economy or excursion fare and so on. Q at one time was the lowest economy fare rate, but that has changed. Lots of airlines are also, at the moment, revising their fare letter designations....I suspect that this is a CO flight and they have changed many of the codes in recent months with lots of new letters introduced and others will eventually be dropped (ie, what was Q class is now the X class, V became U, etc, etc - what a mess.) The numbers next to each letter represent the number of seats that can be still be sold in each fare class, in this flight, the cheapo tickets are gone......when the number 9 is used, it means that 9 OR MORE seats are still available, ie, there are more than 9 seats in economy available on this flight.

There are additional letters that you do not see, for example on CO you can upgrade your H class ticket on overseas flights to Business First for 40,000 miles, and then you will be ticketed in R class.

The basic letters are P or F for First Class, C or J for Business Class, and Y for Economy class......the rest is fare stuff that can be specific to an airline.

Hope I helped.


User currently offlineHorus From Egypt, joined Feb 2004, 5230 posts, RR: 60
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30726 times:

Dutchjet, Wow, you know your info  Wow!


EGYPT: A 7,000 Year Old Civilisation
User currently offlineScottishLaddie From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 2384 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30686 times:

Excellent! Respect! Big grin So judging by that how full would you say that example of a flight is? 75%?

User currently offlineDutchjet From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 7864 posts, RR: 57
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30659 times:

Really no way of knowing exactly how many seats are sold on the flight, the airlines yeild management add and take away seats from various fare classes up until the day of departure, so who knows.....if this flight is operating over the summer months, cheap seats can be hard to find on CO - on certain routes this summer, U=V class is not even being offered and Q=X and I classes are very, very hard to find, all as part of the effort to increase yeilds and revenues.

That being said, with no cheap seats open, and if the flight is departing within a couple of weeks time, its a safe bet that the loads are pretty good. Do note that the BF cabin has only 4 seats left (D and Z are subcategories of J)....I think this is the EDI-EWR flight (I have read your posts before, ScottishLaddie) so 12 out of the 16 BF seats on the 752 are sold, pretty good for this new route.


User currently offlineFastenseatbelt From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 76 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30627 times:

my deepest respect dutchjet!

really looking forward to seeing co here in edi!!!!



Above the clouds...it must be beatutiful there
User currently offlineScottishLaddie From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 2384 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30621 times:

If I remember rightly, that was EDI-EWR in July sometime.
Also, I may not be an expert, but this flight looks virtually full to me.  Big grin

July 14

Cabin class: J0 C0 D0 W0 Z2 S0 Y0 M0 H0 Q0 B0 K0 L0 V0 T0 N0 X0 G0 E0

This particular flight is the Transaero DME-EDI service on the 14th of July. Not bad  Smile


Oo, hello fellow Edinburger  Laugh out loud Welcome to a.net.


[Edited 2004-05-30 01:59:36]

User currently offlineAussie747 From Australia, joined Aug 2003, 1163 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 30557 times:

They are also different for different airlines as well. And not all codes on display are sellable for that one country either.

First class on some other airlines are usually represented by
A and F

Some other business class codes seen are C and I

Some other economy codes can be are N as well.

In the case for a Qantas domestic flight the codes are as follows and their meanings.

J - full published fae level Business Class
D - International flight connections for Domestic business class
Y - Full Economy Class.
U- Class not shown on availability screen but denotes upgrade from Economy to Business.
H, B, - Fully Flexible and full refundable levels of fare economy class
K - Fully Flexible but non refundable economy fare
M,L,V - Flexi fare saver type fares, flexible but at an extra fee
S and Q - wholesale holiday fares, must be booked with acomodation
E - Industry classed fare
Q - special unique fare for specials eg around Xmas etc esp on QF Link services.
O, N - cheapest class of economy fare - similar restrictions to M,L,V

Of course if the flight as international some classes do have different meanings.

So judging by that how full would you say that example of a flight is? 75%
Having said that only the airlines can really judge that, as seeing a H9 can really mean 9 'H' class seats on 42 or 57 of them. Generally though when you do start seeing quote a few "c" next to the class it mean that waitlists are closed for that booking class, or when there are a lot of "0" next to the booking class the flight are quite full indeed.

However inm terms of an international flight it is not uncommon for airline about a couple of months out to see about 120% of their seats, As in due course it goes down to the 100% booked or there abouts. Airlines have a complicated yield management program to work on such levels. It is only on the day when they are overfull that "bumping" can occur.




User currently offlineElectraBob From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 931 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 30498 times:

The various classes of service discussed above can, at times, come into play after someone has purchased a non-refundable ticket. Most airlines will allow someone who is holding a non-refundable ticket to make a change to their return flight for a penalty--with most major carriers, the fee to change their return flight is $100. However....to change your return flight and only pay the $100 change fee, the new flight must have a seat available in the same class of service as the original ticket. For example, you have a non-refundable ticket...DTW-SEA-DTW...and both flights are ticketed in "K" class on Northwest. You want to make a return flight change...your new flight must have a "K" class seat available, or you will pay the $100 fee PLUS an airfare increase. If you cannot find a "K" class seat on a nonstop return flight, you can try to find a connection....in that case, all new flights involved must have a "K" class seat available. Changing a non refundable ticket can get very expensive during peak travel times when no discounted classes of service are available.

Continental Airlines (along with American and United) offer "net" fares from various locations in the United States to destinations in Mexico, Central America and South America. I sell quite a few of these tickets.....in some cases, you must have a "Q" class seat available to sell these low fares...other times you must have a "S" class seat, and in still others, a "V" seat must be available. Net fares are quite a bit cheaper than regular published fares. Travel agents love to sell them....why?...we can mark them up and make a nice profit from them...while still offering the customer a fare less than a published fare. Many times however, the class of service needed is not available.



Having a smoking section in a restaurant is like having a peeing section in a swimming pool.....
User currently offlineCx123 From Australia, joined May 2004, 695 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 30354 times:

Also note that U, Z and I think X class are Non-Rev Frequent Flyer tickets (Oneworld Carriers)

Different airlines have different coding system. eg, CX uses I as well for discount business class (it ranks below D)

Normally if Y, J and F = 0, it will mean that the flight is pretty full.
They usually release seats in pairs of 9 therefore on the system it will have a number from 0-9.


User currently offlineLH423 From Canada, joined exactly 15 years ago today! , 6501 posts, RR: 54
Reply 10, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 30289 times:

On BA:

First:
F: Full fare First Class
A: Discounted First Class
Z: Redemption First Class

Club:
J: Full Fare Club World
C/D: Discounted Club World
I: Deeply Discounted Club World
U: Redemption Club World

World Traveller Plus:
W: Full Fare World Traveller Plus
T: Discounted World Traveller Plus
P: Redemption World Traveller Plus

World Traveller:
Y: Full Fare World Traveller
H/B: Slightly Discounted World Traveller
G: Groups
K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R (former Full Fare Concorde), S, V: Discounted/Deeply Discounted World Traveller
X: Redemption World Traveller

LH423

[Edited 2004-05-30 09:23:10]


« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
User currently offlineShilla From Germany, joined May 2002, 185 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 30073 times:

JA DA YR MR KR

Just another question concerning booking classes:

I know that "A" stands for available, but what is the "R" standing for ? I also often read "L", I guess this means "low" - and "C" ? Maybe "closed" ?

Shilla



The world is a book and he who stays at home reads only one page...
User currently offlineKKMolokai From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 760 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 29959 times:

"I know that "A" stands for available, but what is the "R" standing for ? I also often read "L", I guess this means "low" - and "C" ? Maybe "closed" ?"

"A" usually designates a First Class upgrade (and does not stand for "available")

"R" usually designates a Business Class upgrade (not "closed")

"C" also designates Business Class (not "closed")

"L" is a Coach fare (not "low")



We are the people of American Airlines. And we know why you fly.
User currently offlineShilla From Germany, joined May 2002, 185 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 29870 times:

I guess you talk of the first letter = booking class. But I meant the second one (like JA - does this stand for "J available", or is "A" standing for first class upgrade like KKMolokai wrote ?)


The world is a book and he who stays at home reads only one page...
User currently offlineStefandotde From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 1 day ago) and read 29821 times:

Shilla: R is for "Request", when booking has been made, it appears as L (for waiting list). These A and R in availibility is output from special airlines when they don't share or don't have a link to another reservation system.

And KK, the "L" doesn't automatically mean "Coach", each airline has it's own booking classes - just letters, no special meaning. Maybe different to the F for First.


User currently offlineAms From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 1689 posts, RR: 11
Reply 15, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 29771 times:

R class also exists. For Example Eva Air uses R class for their Evergreen Deluxe class.

Also Concorde used R class as supersonic Class.


Regards,
AMS


User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 22 hours ago) and read 29735 times:

Re: know that "A" stands for available, but what is the "R" standing for ? I also often read "L", I guess this means "low" - and "C" ? Maybe "closed" ?

Sometimes an airline (usually pretty low-tech ones) only provide a class status rather than a numeric status.

A = Available for Sale
R = Request Reservations (means may or may not be available)
L = No space available, Waitlist Open
C = No space availabe, Waitlist Closed.


User currently offlineShilla From Germany, joined May 2002, 185 posts, RR: 3
Reply 17, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 21 hours ago) and read 29704 times:

Exactly what I wanted to know - thanks JGPH1A !


The world is a book and he who stays at home reads only one page...
User currently offlineCVG777 From United States of America, joined May 2000, 1251 posts, RR: 6
Reply 18, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 29636 times:

When my family flew on Delta last Christmas on Skymiles awards tickets, I remember having the designation "N," which I will guess stands for Nonrev.

CVG777


User currently offlineCaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 19, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 29567 times:

In the example ScottishLaddie gave, that flight was not just full, it was oversold. Most flights are allowed to be oversold to a certain amount depending on the aircraft type.


There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineCx123 From Australia, joined May 2004, 695 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 6 hours ago) and read 29414 times:

It is NOT oversold!
Cabin class: J4 D3 Z2 Y9 H9 K9 N9 B9 V0 U0 Q0 I0 S0 W0 T0 X0 L0

The are still 9 in Y (Mean prob >9 seats)

Also the J Class Cabin still OK.

Just because all the discount economy is 0 is does not mean it is full or oversold.
The good indicators are Y and J (if these are 0 then it is likely oversold)


User currently offlineCaptaink From Mexico, joined May 2001, 5109 posts, RR: 12
Reply 21, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 29345 times:

I was talking about this example....

If I remember rightly, that was EDI-EWR in July sometime.
Also, I may not be an expert, but this flight looks virtually full to me.

July 14

Cabin class: J0 C0 D0 W0 Z2 S0 Y0 M0 H0 Q0 B0 K0 L0 V0 T0 N0 X0 G0 E0

This particular flight is the Transaero DME-EDI service on the 14th of July. Not bad

Sorry I should have mentioned which example.... But in the one above, the flight is oversold, at least in coach. Seems like there are two seats for sale left in the premium cabin. Some airlines dont't allow the premium cabin to be oversold.



There is something special about planes....
User currently offlineScottishLaddie From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 2384 posts, RR: 8
Reply 22, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 29309 times:

Oversold!? The aircraft type is a 73G, unless they are planning on using a 767 on that particular day?

User currently offlineCx123 From Australia, joined May 2004, 695 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (10 years 1 month 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 29303 times:


Cabin class: J0 C0 D0 W0 Z2 S0 Y0 M0 H0 Q0 B0 K0 L0 V0 T0 N0 X0 G0 E0

This looks like it is either overbook or certain cabin is Not offer (judging by the fact it is a 73G aircraft)

But when "0" starts to show your chance is low


User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5123 posts, RR: 34
Reply 24, posted (10 years 1 month 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 29223 times:

Oversold!? The aircraft type is a 73G, unless they are planning on using a 767 on that particular day?

Not everyone turns up for flights, so airlines commonly overbook to ensure they make as much money as possible.

The airlines will know exactly how many people normally dont turn up for a specific route, and overbook by the same amount. No point selling all 100 seats then turning folk away when you know 10 people will probably not turn up. Therefore the airlines sell 110 seats for the flight, and prey they guessed right and that only 100 people will turn up...



That'll teach you
25 ScottishLaddie : And what if the people do turn up? Do they just turn them away, re-book them onto another flight?
26 Nighthawk : ScottishLaddie: ever seen "Airport"?. This used to happen almost every episode. Once they know everyone is going to turn up, they start asking people
27 ScottishLaddie : I see, thanks for clearing that up.
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