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Contrails  
User currently offlineNW7E7 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 534 posts, RR: 5
Posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 1262 times:

This has probably been asked before but the search turned up negative.

1. What weather conditions must take place in order for contrails to appear?
2. Is there a certain altitude that you have to be above to have contrails?

Thanx
NW7E7



8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 1238 times:

The same ones that make your breath appear in front of your face.


Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
User currently offlineNWADC9 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4896 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 1233 times:

Yes, altitude-wise, I start seeing them on FS around 18,000 Ft. with fair conditions, but in real life it may be different.


Flying an aeroplane with only a single propeller to keep you in the air. Can you imagine that? -Capt. Picard
User currently offlineJadedmonkeys From United States of America, joined May 2004, 67 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 1224 times:

A small difference between temperature and dew point. If temparature is say 4 celsius and dew point is 2 then that could be ideal because when a fast moving aircraft moves through the air, it compresses air and as air compresses, it cools down and if temperature and dewpoint is the same, you will have visible moisture as in clouds and contrails. the dewpoint is the temperature at which moist air saturates and condenses which in turn becomes clouds and contrails. This also explains why you get that cloud ring when an aircraft goes Mach 1.

User currently offlineNW7E7 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 534 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 1211 times:

INNOCUOUSFOX:
If it is the same ones that make your breath appear in front of your face then how come I never see any contrails at sea level or when an aircraft is taking off??

NW7E7


User currently offlineAjet From France, joined Jan 2004, 51 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 1148 times:

NWADC9,

contrails may or may not appear depending on the current weather conditions; contrails' altitude range changes every day.
When you're planning a visual interception and dogfight mission, the military weather service will tell you where to expect contrails, so that you don't fly at those altitude ranges and keep visually discreet.


User currently offlineInnocuousFox From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 2805 posts, RR: 14
Reply 6, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week 3 hours ago) and read 1092 times:

"If it is the same ones that make your breath appear in front of your face then how come I never see any contrails at sea level or when an aircraft is taking off??"

Because the difference in relative humidity and/or dew points between the two airmasses isn't enough.



Dave Mark - Intrinsic Algorithm - Reducing the world to mathematical equations!
User currently offlineGeoffm From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2004, 2111 posts, RR: 6
Reply 7, posted (10 years 2 months 1 week ago) and read 1040 times:

I was just thinking about this the other day. I was near Weston-super-Mare in the UK and was watching a few planes fly over at high altitude. Both had contrails right up to the point where they crossed over to land (instead of the sea) where they abruptly stopped. It was most interesting to see!

Geoff M.


User currently offlineCRJDISPATCHKID From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 99 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (10 years 2 months 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 1010 times:

Let's see if I can use some of my meteorology background to explain.

First a definition:
Contrails - Long, narrow, ice-crystal clouds that form behind jet planes flying at high altitudes in below-freezing temperatures


Contrails are generally found at high levels (where the temperature is roughly -25c/-32F about FL250) in nearly saturated conditions. Aircraft inflight emit water droplets into the atmosphere (from the exhaust) which then freeze in this cold / moist atmosphere. That's how you get 'em.

I remember a study being done during the period when no a/c were flying after 9/11 and the results stated that average daily variations in temperature (between high and low temps) increase by 2F.

Kinda intersting



Thanks...C-Ya...Bye
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