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Aer Lingus Registering Planes After Cities?  
User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 1905 times:

After visiting Dublin, I noticed that quite a few of Aer Lingus' 330s have registrations that are also the codes of the airports that they fly to, such as EI-DUB, EWR, JFK, LAX, and ORD. What I found interesting was that the actual name of the plane did not relate to the reg (such as something like "New York" for EI-JFK) and some of the planes had regs that did not correspond to cities (such as DAA, CRK - although "CRK" is an airport in the Philippines) as well as cities that did not have planes registered after them.

All of this made me wonder if the regs were chosen randomly or not.

Thanks.  Smile
-Will


"She Flew For What We Stand For"
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineL.1011 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 2209 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 1884 times:

DAA is random. EWR=Newark LAX=Los Angeles CRK=Cork DUB=Dublin JFK=New York ORD=Chicago SHN=Shannon

User currently offlineChrisNH From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 4092 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 1822 times:

I was sitting with the cockpit crew of an Aer Lingus A330 enroute from Dublin to Boston (they loved having visitors; but obviously pre-9/11) several years ago and I asked why no 'BOS' aircraft. They said that registration had already been taken. Still, it's rather dangerous to be registering aircraft in the name of cities: what if Aer Lingus decides that 'EWR' or 'LAX' will be discontinued?

Chris in NH


User currently offlineDstc47 From Ireland, joined Sep 1999, 1468 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 1778 times:

EWR was indeed dropped post 9/11.

ORK was not used for some reason and SNN had been taken.

The aircraft are named after Saints, a long standing practice.


User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 1733 times:

EWR=Newark LAX=Los Angeles CRK=Cork DUB=Dublin JFK=New York ORD=Chicago SHN=Shannon

Yes, I knew that. My question was if that was done intentionally, which others have already answered.

CRK is actually the code for an airport in the Philippines; ORK is the correct code for Cork.

 Smile
-Will



"She Flew For What We Stand For"
User currently offlineCrosswind From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2000, 2598 posts, RR: 58
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 1711 times:
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Aer Lingus are just following Virgin Atlantic's lead, they haven't really done anything that unusual - Virgin Atlantic's fleet has been registered with stylised registrations, several with reference to destinations, and British Airways' regional B737-300 fleet was registered to inculude the airport codes of the cities they flew to.

Virgin Atlantic
G-VJFK
G-VLAX
G-VMIA
G-TKYO
G-VATH

British Airways
G-ODUS
G-Ofra (Can't type it in CAPS due to a forum scrip error)
G-OHAJ
G-OMUC
G-OAMS
G-XMAN
G-XBHX

British Caledonian had a B747 registered G-HUGE. British Airways had a B747 freighter registered G-KILO, and their B777 G-RAES is a tribute to the Royal Aeronautical Society!

Some of Monarch's fleet have been registered to include the initials of former staff, for example Alan J Sutton was managing director of the airline for many years, so it's no surprise they have an A300 registered G-MAJS. Airtours International's MD-83 fleet also incorporated director's initials.

Very often seemingly "random" registrations have some significance to the airline...

Regards
CROSSWIND


User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 month 1 week 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 1635 times:

Interesting, I never noticed that about VS and BA. It stands out more with Aer Lingus because there are not other letters (such as EI-JFK compared to G-VJFK).

The reason that I wondered was because not all cities were included and the names were not associated with the regs.

Thanks for the VS and BA info.  Smile
-Will



"She Flew For What We Stand For"
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