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Double Decker 747?  
User currently offlineVSXA380X800 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 421 posts, RR: 1
Posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3100 times:

When PanAm and Boeing set out to find a solution for a larger airliner to replace the smaller 707. When looked at a double Decker 747, they turned down the idea.
My question is
+If they went ahead with a Double Decker 747, What would have became of the A380?



4 decks 4 engines 4 long haul
8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1586 posts, RR: 10
Reply 1, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3088 times:

Perhaps you can clarify what you are trying to ask?





Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineBoeingBus From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1597 posts, RR: 17
Reply 2, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3082 times:

The A380 is all pride for Airbus and Europe as a whole, as it's going to take over 10 years before they make a single penney...

Basically, if Boeing a had a full double decker 747, Airbus would be working on, if not for size it would be the technology (maybe the wings would flap..etc...) to TOP the 747. It's all for prestige and glory... maybe for a snipet in the Guiness Book of World Records.



Airbus or Boeing - it's all good to me!
User currently offlineVSXA380X800 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 421 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 3074 times:

In other words, If Beoing and PanAm did go with a double decker 747 , and later on Airbus came up with the A380, will the A380 have a hump like the 747 ?


4 decks 4 engines 4 long haul
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17118 posts, RR: 66
Reply 4, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 3033 times:

The double decker 747 would most probably have been narrower than the current 747. At least that's what the studies showed at the time. So the A380 would still have been much bigger.

In any case it was thought that with the advent of SSTs the 747 was doomed to become a freighter by the 80s, which explains the width (containers) and the hump (flight deck out of the way of freight deck, and nose door option).




"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineVSXA380X800 From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 421 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2929 times:

I've heard two stories-

1+ The 747 was to a freighter
2+ It was to be a double Decker

Right now I'm believing a bit of both, mostly number 1. I have more facts on the freighter version than the double deck.



[Edited 2004-07-20 04:52:38]


4 decks 4 engines 4 long haul
User currently offlineL.1011 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 2209 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2893 times:

At the time of the 747 development program, the 2707 (American SST) was alive and well. Boeing and Juan Trippe at Pan Am both believed the 2707 and its family would take over from subsonic planes completely. The 747 has the "bulge" because the cockpit was located there to allow nose loading, because Boeing and Pan Am figured the planes would all be flying cargo in 10 years. Looking at concept cutaways, Trippe noticed the empty space behind the cockpit in the fairing. He asked what is was for, the response was "a crew rest or something." Trippe decided he wanted a First Class lounge, and the double-decker was born. The bulge not only allows the 747 to be one of the most successful freighters around, but improves speed and fuel economy, and maintains the world-renowned profile. After the intros of both the 747 and 777, passengers specifically requested these aircraft when booking. The VC10 also had such amazing passenger reviews that it was specifically requested over BOAC's 707 and Comet 4 fleet. The A380 will have the same publicity as the 747. Whether the reviews will remain so impressive, as they were with all 3 prior planes, remains to be seen. Hats off to the 747. Did you also know that the 747 cross-section was determined by drawing circles around two LD3 containers? The 747 was not intended to do what it has done. It was an amazing coincidence. In the end, the 747 "frieghter" has sold nearly 1000 planes, become a global icon, been a massive moneymaker for Boeing, and made Boeing a household name throughout the world. The 2707 is now represented by a rotting hulk in a junkyard in Florida.

User currently onlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8435 posts, RR: 9
Reply 7, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 2888 times:

Most bits I have seen on the 747's history mentions the freighter potential. It's interesting that today the freighter side seems to have more open orders than pax versions.

It is also interesting to look how the 747 has evolved from its first rollout to the -400. How many years is it going to take for the 7E7 and 380 to mature to their full potential?

As for the double decker part on the 747 - it is the perfect upper deck for those lucky enough to get to ride up there.


User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3651 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (10 years 4 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 2817 times:

I've heard two stories-

1+ The 747 was to a freighter
2+ It was to be a double Decker

Right now I'm believing a bit of both, mostly number 1. I have more facts on the freighter version than the double deck.


Apparently you didn't see the TV show on the Discovery Channel the other night - two mockups of the early double-decker designs were shown and talked about. I don't recall the reasons they went to the hump design (I still have the show Tivo'd), but I think it was because they wanted width rather than height for freight. The 747 was supposed to be designed for both pax and freight from the beginning.

Anyway, I have seen the mockups, as I'm sure have other people here, so it definitely was a double-decker originally. It did look shorter and narrower as a double-decker than the final design, though - basically like a very tall 707.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
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