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The Meaning Of Reso'cha  
User currently offlineFlygbear From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 33 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3933 times:
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Can anybody fill me in on the meaning of JALways labeled aircraft that shows the name Reso'cha shown on the side of the aircraft. This is especially prevalent on HNL. I don't recall hearing what "Reso'cha" means.



flygbear/MSP
14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineUA2162 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 495 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3918 times:

I know JL uses the Reso'cha planes for their leisure routes (Hawaii, Saipan and Guam.) However, I don't know what the actual meaning of the word is.

User currently offlineAloha73g From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2362 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3910 times:

RESOort CHArter
Reso'Cha

Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlineNorthwest717 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3904 times:

LOL! I always thought it was some Hawaiian word! Heh, I sure feel stupid now. That makes perfect sense now.  Big thumbs up

-Tim  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineTT737FO From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 472 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3794 times:

Not a bad deduction Aloha73g, but...

you are reading too much into the word.

RESOCHA is simply Japanese for resort.


User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1585 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3761 times:

Reminds me of a long time ago when I was positioning from TYO to HNL. I always remember being directed to the aptly named 'Final Departure Lounge' at around 2100 on a Sunday evening, due to land in HNL at around 0900 Sunday morning!

I was sitting next to a charming Hawaiian gentleman, and after chatting through dinner and into our coffee and liqueurs, I asked him 'I hope you don't mind me saying, but I've always wanted to know how to pronounce Hawaii - is it Hawaii, or Havaii?' He responded 'Havaii'! I then said thank you very much, to which he replied 'You're velcome!'

Another interesting item, have you noticed the Japanese word 'obligado', for 'thank you'? It is almost the same as 'obrigado' for 'thank you' in Portuguese. That Henry the Navigator certainly got around!





Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3624 posts, RR: 12
Reply 6, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3748 times:

Another interesting item, have you noticed the Japanese word 'obligado', for 'thank you'? It is almost the same as 'obrigado' for 'thank you' in Portuguese. That Henry the Navigator certainly got around!

Uh, the Japanese word for thank you is "arigato", not "obligado" - this one almost made me really laugh out loud! If you say "obligado" to somebody in Japan they're not going to have any idea what the heck you're talking about.

Still sort of close to "obrigado" (though pronounced quite differently) but probably completely coincidental - lot of words like that in various languages.

TT737FO is correct about Reso'cha from what I know of it... I don't think "charter" is really part of it, the "cha" is just a sound to add on to the end of "reso" to make it sound cooler to the Japanese. I'd actually asked my wife (who's Japanese) about this a year or two ago and she told me it just meant "resort" and that these planes were pretty well-known in Japan, even among non-spotters.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineSamurai 777 From Canada, joined Jan 2000, 2458 posts, RR: 4
Reply 7, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3740 times:

RESOort CHArter
Reso'Cha

Aloha!


That's a very good point. Interestingly, I've never thought about that even though I know it's a subsidiary of JAL aimed at the Japanese leisure market and flies to resort destinations such as Honolulu, Guam, Okinawa, Saipan, Brisbane (because Coolangatta near Gold Coast doesn't take in international flights from Asia) - and even Sydney, which is a bit weird to me. "Reso'cha" doesn't even sound remotely to me as being a Hawaiian word - there is no "ch" in the Hawaiian language. And no c's either. (Hawaiian is also supposed to have only 12 letters in its alphabet - the shortest of any language alive today) Rather, I always thought it was Japanese in origin because it was on JAL aircraft!

Another interesting item, have you noticed the Japanese word 'obligado', for 'thank you'? It is almost the same as 'obrigado' for 'thank you' in Portuguese. That Henry the Navigator certainly got around!

Actually, the Japanese term is "Arigato". But still, it sounds almost like the Portuguese "Obrigado". In fact, I kind of wonder if the Japanese might have borrowed that term from the Portuguese, as the Portuguese were indeed the only Europeans who were allowed to trade with the Japanese for the most part until the mid-19th Century. And even then, they were only allowed to dock at Nagasaki at first. Japan was a very closed nation during that time.

The Japanese do not use the "l" as there is no "l" sound in the Japanese language as Westerners pronounce it. This will explain also why the Japaenese will often replace the "l" with "r" when speaking English or any other European language using the "l" sound.


User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 8, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3720 times:

RESOCHA is simply Japanese for resort.
Wow, I never knew that is what it meant. It is a lovely scheme!

 Smile
-Will



"She Flew For What We Stand For"
User currently offlineKalakaua From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 1516 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3691 times:

"RESOCHA is simply Japanese for resort."

Whoa... No it isn't. As what Aloha73g said, it's RESORT CHARTER. There's a reason there's an apostrophe there. After all, these planes are used for charters only.

And that "arigatou" vs "obligado" conjecture may not be as far-fetched. Afterall, it was the Portuguese that brought TEMPURA to the islands in the 16th Century. Whether from tempora (the day of abstinence on which Portuguese missionaries ate fish) or the artist's pallet of temperas, historians agree that the addiction to the food changed the course of Japanese history. The Japanese do adopt a lot of foreign words to complete their dictionary.

And the real pronunciation of Hawai`i, is havai-ee. There's a little okina (not an apostrophe), "`" between the letter "i," which means there's a little slight pause, a glottal stop. Like in the word "coordinate."



Gravity explains the motions of the planets, but it cannot explain who set the planets in motion.
User currently offlineJe89_w From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 2360 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3682 times:
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I always thought "Reso'cha" meant "resort", never thought of resort charter, as Aloha73G put it (which makes a lot of sense too).

I guess that answered my question too!


User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3624 posts, RR: 12
Reply 11, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3660 times:

Whoa... No it isn't. As what Aloha73g said, it's RESORT CHARTER. There's a reason there's an apostrophe there.

The Japanese do not generally use apostrophes in between words when contracting borrowed words. It's not "Fami'com", for example, it's "famicom"... so the apostrophe itself means nothing in this case. JAL themselves use "Reso'" by itself on their web site (that's Reso' alone, but with the apostrophe) which is clearly strange even as a borrowed word from English and is not the real Japanese borrowed word from English, so this is obviously something JAL just does to be different.

After all, these planes are used for charters only.

Well, no, they're used for tours organized by JAL. They follow a set schedule to certain destinations. So far as I know, you can charter a Reso'cha plane to anywhere in the world as long as it's Hawaii, Saipan or Guam. And you can do it at any time you want as long as it's the time JAL sets. You can find the Reso'cha schedules on the JAL web site (they have it both on the Reso'cha web site and the main JAL site along with the regular international schedules).

The real borrowed word for "resort" in Japanese sounds a lot like "Risotto" and if you wrote it out in Roman letters would look a lot like it too (rizo-to). It would also be pretty pointless to write out a borrowed English word in romanized Japanese so I think JAL is just trying to be distinct. "Reso'cha" is one of those words that doesn't really mean anything in any language but it still conveys a sense of what it means to the Japanese.

And that "arigatou" vs "obligado" conjecture may not be as far-fetched. Afterall, it was the Portuguese that brought TEMPURA to the islands in the 16th Century.

I think this pretty definitively dispells the myth that "arigato" came from Portugese:

http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/12/12-1906.html

You're right about tempura, though.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineHa763 From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 3655 posts, RR: 5
Reply 12, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3653 times:
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As a JAL employee, I can tell you that Reso'cha is a shortening and combination of "Resort Charter" and is also a marketing campaign by JAL for Hawaii, Guam, and Saipan. JALways also started out flying only charters as Japan Air Charter in 1991 and was spun off and renamed in 1999.

http://www.resocha.jal.co.jp

It is a popular practice to combine and shorten titles, event names, etc. For example, Kareshi Kanjou no Jijou (a manga and anime title), is shortened to Kare Kano.


User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 13, posted (10 years 4 weeks 1 day ago) and read 3632 times:

Whoa... No it isn't. As what Aloha73g said, it's RESORT CHARTER. There's a reason there's an apostrophe there. After all, these planes are used for charters only.
Good point. Thanks for the clarification.

 Smile
-Will



"She Flew For What We Stand For"
User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1585 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (10 years 4 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3574 times:

Thanks for clarifying the words - at least we got a few more people chatting about something different!





Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
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