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Passenger Dies Enroute To Buenos Aires.  
User currently offlineLVZXV From Gabon, joined Mar 2004, 2041 posts, RR: 36
Posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 9947 times:

I don't know if this has made the news or not:

A cousin of mine flew LGW-MAD-EZE yesterday with Aerolíneas Argentinas, arriving early this morning in Buenos Aires. Upon arriving she called to let me know she had arrived safely, but that on the MAD-EZE sector, a middle-aged English passenger died in the middle of the night, shortly after lights-out.
He was flying in the Club Condor section, in the forward cabin of the 747-400, with his wife. Apparently, they had been flying to Buenos Aires for an art exhibition and, according to my cousin, he looked in perfectly good health prior to and in the early stages of the flight.
The plane, flying Flight AR 1133 pressed on to its destination without making an emergency landing. He was moved to the back of the cabin, and his widowed wife will have to complete necessary paperwork in Buenos Aires before returning him to England for burial.
This is very sad news. May he rest in eternal peace.

By the way, do all passengers who die of "natural causes" on commercial flights make the news, or only some? Just that I've heard of very few.

XV




How do you say "12 months" in Estonian?
24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDoorsToManual From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9647 times:

It's certainly not unusual, as in the 8 months of flying for my airline (we only fly within Europe), 2 onboard deaths have occurred, both after a 3.5 hour flight to London from ATH. Both were due to massive heart attacks, and both passengers died suddenly, without warning.

The usual procedure is to cover the unfortunate person with a blanket and move them to an isolated area. The Captain will need to complete some 'Death on board' paperwork and depending on circumstances, will elect to complete or divert the flight.

The cabin crew will probably have a special debrief lead by a Cabin Crew supervisor to ascertain any other useful details/discuss the flight.

Never pleasant, and not necessarily a news item.


User currently offlineScottysAir From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9597 times:

This is very sad news for those passenger dies on their plane and will send them back to England for burial there. It is not good for their health. It should keep there in home. It will not go anywhere without doctor's permission to go there.

User currently offlineCessnaLady From Mexico, joined May 2004, 310 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9594 times:

I understand the A340 has a special container for placing corpses of passengers who die on flight, right at one of the galleys? Can anyone confirm/deny?

Marie


User currently offlineBCAInfoSys From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9583 times:

CessnaLady -

I think that's an option. I know some SQ a/c have them.


User currently offlineSafetyDude From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3795 posts, RR: 15
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9565 times:

I understand the A340 has a special container for placing corpses of passengers who die on flight, right at one of the galleys? Can anyone confirm/deny?
The SQ 345 has this option, and there was a picture of it in the database, but it was removed a while ago.

There have been other topics on this subject that deal with procedures, if you are interested.

 Smile
-Will



"She Flew For What We Stand For"
User currently offlineFlyingColours From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2315 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9524 times:

SQ didn't appreciate the advertisment of their freezer, don't EK have one on their A345 too?

The procedures vary from airline to airline but if the person dies during the flight and nothing can be done (CPR, Defib etc...) then the flight usually continues, there are a few topics floating around discussing this as Will said.

Phil
FlyingColours



Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
User currently offline767Lover From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9465 times:

Re: moving the passenger to the back of the cabin...

How is this handled in terms of talking to the other passengers? Obviously the sight of seeing a covered body carried to the back of the plane would be extremely upsetting. Are they briefed beforehand so they won't be caught off guard?

How awful for the man, and especially for his wife. I can't imagine having to complete a journey after just seeing my husband die.



User currently offlineBMAbound From Sweden, joined Nov 2003, 660 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 9426 times:

Didn't Singapore install some kind of container with the sole purpose of holding corpses on their A345? I believe things can get rather nasty on the trans Pacific flights even before the pilots are able to divert.

Yes, you're right ScottysAir, dying is not good for one's health.

regards,

johan



Altitude is Insurance - Get Insured
User currently offlineARGinMIA From Argentina, joined Nov 2001, 487 posts, RR: 5
Reply 9, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 9377 times:

I don't think the corpse will start to smell.. I mean.. in a 15 hour flight.. if the pax dies 1 hour into the flight thats 14 hours left for him.. and usually the Aircraft temperature is on the cold side... I highly doubt he will start to rot that fast.. according to this website http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Death/Stages.html it takes 24hs for the body to start smelling..


Alto.. Mucho mas alto.. hasta la cumbre
User currently offlineLVZXV From Gabon, joined Mar 2004, 2041 posts, RR: 36
Reply 10, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 9221 times:

My cousin said the passenger died shortly after "lights-out" on the MAD-EZE sector. Aircraft due to depart at 21:45 and finally took off at 23:00, 2 hours ahead of GMT. Aircraft landed at 06:00, 3 hours behind GMT. So it was a 12 hour flight. Lights-out is usually some time after dinner, so he probably died 3-4 hours into the flight.
In Argentina, due to the heat from October-April, a body has to be buried within 24 hours--or "one sunset"--for obvious reasons. Luckily, as it's mid-winter in Buenos Aires right now, the lower temperatures mean that the Englishman's body can be returned in good condition to London, and gives his wife time to complete the necessary paperwork.
Sorry, this is morbid, but it's topical.

XV




How do you say "12 months" in Estonian?
User currently offlineCedarjet From United Kingdom, joined May 1999, 8114 posts, RR: 53
Reply 11, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 9196 times:

WOW! I never heard of the freezer before. That's some crazy shit.

Anyone remember the BA flight from the US to London where TWO pax died en route? One shortly after takeoff, they offloaded the body in Gander and the second checked out soon after take off from Nova Scotia.

Anyone want to guess where they were flying from? Yeah, you got it: Miami.



fly Saha Air 707s daily from Tehran's downtown Mehrabad to Mashhad, Kish Island and Ahwaz
User currently offlineNWAFA From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1893 posts, RR: 15
Reply 12, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 9175 times:

I had a very young military man die on one of my flights. It was a charter flight from LAX to YKO (think that was the code of Yokoda Airforce base). We were a few hours into the flight, and a man came up to one of the flight attendants and said that he thought the man next to him was dead....Turned out he was!

The flight was PACKED...so we placed his young man in the crew bunk area...



THANK YOU FOR FLYING NORTHWEST AIRLINES, WE TRULY APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS!
User currently offlineVC10BOAC From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 402 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 8941 times:

On a flight from SDQ to JFK several months ago, we were told to remain in our seats after the plane landed because there was a medical emergency on board, and medical personnel would be boarding the aircraft when the aircraft got to the gate. They gave us no more information. After about 15 minutes of waiting in our seats, we were told to move across to the left aisle and exit the aircraft. As I walked past the area of activity, I noticed a body covered with a white sheet lying in the right aisle. The medical personnel were standing around the body but no one was giving him/her medical attention, so I assumed the person was dead. There was no announcement about what had happened and to this day I have no idea of what happened.

User currently offlineFlyingColours From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2315 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 8861 times:

Cedarjet - IIRC someone else died on a VS flight out of MIA that same day, there was a big thread here when it happened.

The freezer is there to place the recently deceased because they should not be put in the galleys (According to my manual), bodies won't start smelling for around 24 hours, the number one concern is that liquids may start to be released and also there is a problem of flatulence. According to my manual the body should be left in the seat with a blanket covering him/her and any adjacent passengers should be re-seated, any passenger travelling with the deceased should be asked weather they want to remain with the body or be moved.

The problem is what happens if someone dies an hour into a trans-pacific and the plane is full - would you really expect someone to sit next to (and have their meal) next to a corpse? - hence the freezer.

Phil
FlyingColours



Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
User currently offlineASTROJET707 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 299 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 22 hours ago) and read 8757 times:

Aside from the sight of a fresh stiff...the body leaks water and cavity contents...not very pleasant for the survivors. I can understand the on board morgues.


AJ707


User currently offlineArcano From Chile, joined Mar 2004, 2407 posts, RR: 23
Reply 16, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 8196 times:

ArginMia: I don't think the corpse will start to smell.. I mean.. in a 15 hour flight.. if the pax dies 1 hour into the flight thats 14 hours left for him.. and usually the Aircraft temperature is on the cold side...

Actually, the "smell" of corps are not related to rot only. There are some effects after the brain dead that also make the body "smell" (I don't want to be too descriptive...)

Poor guy and poor wife.




in order: 721,146,732,763,722,343,733,320,772,319,752,321,88,83,744,332,100,738, 333, 318, 77W, 78, 773 and 380
User currently offlineJeffrey1970 From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 1336 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 18 hours ago) and read 8032 times:

My prayers go out to the friends and family of this man.


God bless through Jesus, Jeff
User currently offlineA340600 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2003, 4105 posts, RR: 51
Reply 18, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 6877 times:

R.I.P. My thoughts go to the poor widow.

Didn't AA have a problem with their 777s and near a dorr passengers kept dropping dead?

Sam



Despite the name I am a Boeing man through and through!
User currently offlineZaphod From United Arab Emirates, joined Feb 2004, 81 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 6712 times:

EK had a case of a pax dying on board a couple of days back. EK421 flying from PER to DXB. May his soul rest in peace.
However, some happy things happen too. EK had a baby delived on it flight EK344 DXB-BKK-CGK. Flight was diverted to HYD. The baby was born by then though.


User currently offlineBtv92 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 51 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 6493 times:

Regarding Zaphod's post: I'm surprised a women that close to term in their pregnancy would be allowed to fly internationally with their physician's approval.It may seem to many medical folks to be quite risky,but she probably had to get to where she was flying for a good reason. My prayers go out to the unfortunate gentleman who died on the EZE flight and his wife/family. Cheers,Timothy

User currently offlineDebonair From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 2429 posts, RR: 4
Reply 21, posted (10 years 1 month 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 6361 times:

@FlyingColours

well, I worked for some german airlines, and the rules are bit different (also to our manuals)...

First, the crew must do a CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION until a licenced doctor is available. This happened last year within germany, a passenger died during the flight, no doctor available- so the crew did nearly 45min. CPR on the dead body, until the a/c landed and a doctor released the crew...

well, to your question on long-range. We learned to put the body in a gash-bag (only the bottom part) to save the seat cushion from liquids. If the a/c was fully booked, it is up to the senior manager... He/She can decide, to put the body into one of the lavatories and lock the door... (no comment further needed!)


User currently offlineLearjet23 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (10 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 6054 times:

I am a retired Funeral Director, and HELL YES! A body will start to smell within 15 min if you don't get the mouth closed (rag, nylon, etc) to secure the jaw shut, just rap it under the chin and top of the head.. Remember the process of decomp starts as soon as the blood stops flowing and getting O2. Second the tissue gas will build up and will cause some very foul smelling gases to start rolling out of the nose, ass, and any orifice that it can get out of. It will build up to the point of rupture if not chilled asap. Many sudden deaths are cardiac, but in younger people it is most often a brain aneurysm or in a flight situation, pulmonary emblolysum. In these cases the blood will start to flow out due to massive rupture of the vascular system for a short time. I have taken MANY bodies off ships that were one or two weeks out of port, and had been in the cooler and had no problems. Ships carry heavy body bags, and I assume planes do as well. A well trained crew, and a cool place for the flight for the stiff will make everything bearable. Otherwise, the ship will soon start to smell like a Korean Fish Cooking contest! Too Funky!

User currently offlineFlyingColours From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2003, 2315 posts, RR: 10
Reply 23, posted (10 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 5915 times:

@Debonair

I understand that rules are different between airlines, and of course CPR should be given but in some cases (Such as being 4 hours into the ocean) means that the crew can't continue. All UK Registered and operated commerical aircraft must have a defib onboard and if that fails to bring the passenger back repeatedly then there is little more that can be done. I can definitly understand the use of a Gash bag, but putting the person into the lavatory? - What I mean is here we are instructed not to put anything heavy into the lavatories because the doors could break if something heavy hit it. Thank you for your information.

I think one problem is that many women wear very loose clothing, lots of the muslim clothing (I really don't know what they are called) for example is very loose fitting and it is possible to hide the pregnancy. All crews are trained in delivering in flight and quite often than not (here in the UK) there is someone who is medically trained (Paramedic, Doctor, Midwife - not too many brain surgeons fly charter though  Big grin )

Phil
FlyingColours



Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
User currently offlineFrancoflier From France, joined Oct 2001, 3764 posts, RR: 11
Reply 24, posted (10 years 1 month 2 weeks 5 days 19 hours ago) and read 5665 times:

Isn't there a regulation, at least a FAA regulation, that states that all airliners should carry defibrillators and at least one cabin crewmember has to know how to use it?



Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit posting...
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