Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Official US Retirement Age On Aircraft?  
User currently offlineBIGBlack From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 600 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4887 times:

At what age does the FAA require airlines to retire a craft? Is it an age, number of miles, or a mix of both?

I have been on some 762 and a A300-600 into Logan that made me wonder if they were around longer then me.

Related Q, do pilots get assigned to fly newer aircraft in the fleet based on seniority?


Someone special in the air
12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNwafflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 1050 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4834 times:

I don't believe there is an "official" retirement age -- look at the dc-9's that NWA is still flying, some are around 40 years old. I also know some of them have quite senior pilots, who wouldn't go to the airbus for anything

User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7737 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4823 times:

Aircraft have design limits on time and cycles. As an aircraft approaches and passes those limits it has to undergo more stringent MX procedures from the FAA to keep flying.




Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineDutchjet From Netherlands, joined Oct 2000, 7864 posts, RR: 57
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4827 times:

Firstly, please lets NOT turn this into a NW and their DC9 discussion.

As far as I know, there is no definite retirement age for any aircraft - all commercial airliners are operated pursuant to strict rules and inspections by the FAA or similiar govenmental agencies and are subject to periodic maintenace procedures. Although an airframe may be many years old, it has been built and rebuilt from the ground up on numerous occassions. Manufacturers do have design limitatons in mind when designing and building an airliner, based more on cycles than acutal in the air flying time, but airliners exceed these design limitations all of the time. Many airliners can have a carreers in excess of 35 years if they are properly maintained - maintainence is the key issue.

The 762s and A300-600s were mainly built in the 1980s to early 1990s, and each have many, many years of flying left.





User currently offlineNwafflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 1050 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4812 times:

WOWWWWWWWWWW - cannot even mention a dc-9 -- lol -- dc-9 prejudice? Come on, I'm not taking about the plane, other than as a good example of an old plane, still in active and successful service -- I'll be on 2 of them tomorrow

User currently offlineMiamiair From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4791 times:

There is no limit on time time and cycles. When Boeing designed the 707, the original design objective was 20,000 cycles.

That being said, I have worked on a couple of 707's that had more than 100K hours apiece.

As long as the airplanes are maintained in an airworthy condition, you cann fly them forever and a day.


User currently offlineDvk From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1058 posts, RR: 1
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 4726 times:

There is no required timeline, but the FAA did publish recommendations in the past. They were as follows:

Commercial single aisle: retirement at age 25 for aircraft designed (not built) before 1980; retirement at age 28 for aircraft designed after 1980.

Commercial widebody: retirement at age 28 for aircraft designed before 1980; retirement at age 30 for aircraft designed after 1980

Cargo: retirement at age 35.

Obviously, these suggestions aren't rules, or NW wouldn't be able to fly any of their DC9's. They may have even been dropped by the FAA, but they used to be easily found on multiple sites via internet searches in the late 90's.



I'm not dumb. I just have a command of thoroughly useless information.
User currently offlineRareBear From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 553 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 4716 times:

I think the last couple of 747's that KLM retired had well over 100,000 hours on the airframes. The oldest 747's out there are coming up on 35 years old. N744GE is a test-bed a/c with General Electric and was produced in April of 1970. FedEx has an ex-Pan Am a/c that was made in August of 1970.


Illegitimus non carborundum
User currently offlineSPREE34 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2195 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 4700 times:

Question 1. No.

Question 2. No. Pilots bid trips, not aircraft. The aircraft at the gate is the one they fly, and it's being at the gate is generally (note "generally") a random happening.

Flame away schedulers.



I don't understand everything I don't know about this.
User currently offlineBIGBlack From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 600 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4568 times:

Thanks much for the info! I asked the pilot question based on this show I saw on Discovery Channel about the first AA 777 flight and a senior pilot who was retiring making that run his last flight. They mentioned his seniority played into him getting the honor. I don't know if anyone caught it. They followed his career, the last run, and boeings development of the 777.


Someone special in the air
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 16908 posts, RR: 67
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 4454 times:

As I understand it, seniority is important both in the US and the rest of the world, but works a bit differently, or rather the effect is different.

In general:
- In the US, the heavier the plane, the more the crew gets paid. So more seniority means you can bid on heavier planes since that's where everyone wants to go to make the big bucks.
- In Europe (and IIRC South America) heavier planes do not mean more pay. So many very senior Captains at say, SAS, will bid on MD-80s, which fly intra Europe. That way they can be at home more.

Note: I am talking about WITHIN an airline. Commuter pilots get paid less in any case.

I think I have it right, but maybe some pilots can correct/expand on this.


In my mind, the Euromethod is much more logical. If I were a 55 year old pilot with 28 years at the airline, I would want to fly whatever I felt like, whether it be Intercontinental or domestic/intra-Europe. Why should I be forced to fly the heavies. I have seniority. I want to fly what suits me best personally.


Just my $0.02.




"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineBIGBlack From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 600 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 4350 times:

Interesting feedback! Thanks again sir  Big thumbs up


Someone special in the air
User currently offlineBR715-A1-30 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 1 week 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 4288 times:

Usually it isn't senior pilots being upgraded to newer ships, it is being upgraded to bigger ships. I had a captain on the DC9-10 who looked like he was pushing 90. he said when they retire the DC9-10, they retire him. I've also heard from other DC9 pilots that when the 9's go, they go. Most of the DC9 pilots I've talked to hate airbus aircraft because they like the benefit of gauges over computers

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Drinking Age On US Carrier International Flights posted Fri Apr 22 2005 22:55:12 by AirBerlin
Info Needed On Aircraft Safety Regulation&testing posted Sat Nov 11 2006 01:12:31 by UA777300ER
It's Official: US Carriers' Fares Going Up (Again) posted Sat Nov 4 2006 14:01:52 by 777fan
Ex-Astronaut Wants Pilot Retirement Age Raised posted Mon Oct 30 2006 20:25:31 by KarlB737
Asiana Confirms New Colors On Aircraft posted Tue Oct 10 2006 20:40:54 by HeeseokKoo
EU And US Reach Deal On Passenger Data posted Fri Oct 6 2006 08:37:28 by Leskova
Flags And Registrations On Aircraft? posted Thu Sep 14 2006 21:16:05 by DHHornet
Airport Leads Europe On Aircraft Tracking posted Thu Sep 7 2006 14:08:46 by BA1978
UA's 741/742s: Names On Aircraft? posted Wed Aug 16 2006 21:30:01 by 777fan