Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Ever Felt: You Know More Aviation Than An Aviator  
User currently offlineOurboeing From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 475 posts, RR: 0
Posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3631 times:

Has anyone ever had a conversation with a pilot and felt that you know more about airplanes that he/she does?

I have and as a matter of fact, a couple of times. The first time happened to be when I lives in PHX and was flying from PHX to ORD and this gentleman, in his 20's, sitting next to me started a conversation before we pushed back from the gate. He introduced himself and said that he was a FedEx pilot and being an enthusiast, I got interested. In the meantime, the our plane went passed the FedEx facility and he pointed his Cessna to me and was all excited. I then mentioned the HP 757 we were on and the RR engines on it and he had no clue. He said that he didn't know if we were on a 757.

The second time was at Hong Kong Airport. I was talking to a pilot who was waiting for his flight to Taipai and was supposed to fly back a chartered Learjet. He had good knowledge about business jets but when we started talking about heavies, he got very quiet.

Has anyone else ever had a similar experience?

OURBOEING


44 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePlanemaker From Tuvalu, joined Aug 2003, 6441 posts, RR: 34
Reply 1, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3602 times:

It is a fairly common occurance throughout aviation. I know that it is pretty hard for an enthusiast to fathom but just because someone works in the industry it doesn't mean that aviation is their "hobby."  Smile


Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind. - A. Einstein
User currently offlineRalgha From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 1614 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3596 times:

Hate to burst your bubble, but knowing what kind of engines an airplane has doesn't mean anything to a pilot unless they fly that airplane.

They'll know a lot more than you about the airplanes they fly, and a lot more about the system. Airplane specifics just don't mean squat unless it's an airplane you fly.



09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0
User currently offlineDeltaWings From Switzerland, joined Aug 2004, 1294 posts, RR: 17
Reply 3, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3596 times:

I remember flying from ZRH to LHR on a BA 767-300. I after the flight got in a conversation with a flight atendant. I asked, if she ever flew on a 767-200. She replied, that she had, but preffered the 767-300 over the 767-200 and the...............767-100.  Laugh out loud  Laugh out loud


Homer: Marge, it takes two to lie. One to lie and one to listen.
User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19259 posts, RR: 52
Reply 4, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3594 times:

One assumes that pilots decided on that career because they were interested in aviation... and more than just a passing interest. I can't imagine someone paying so much money to train without being quite fascinated.


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineEnoreFilho From Brazil, joined Jun 2004, 58 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3569 times:

These "pilots" usually are not really pilots. I met one of them some time ago... They just read something or talk with one pilot, and then they imagine the "status" that you can have saying that you are a pilot. So, they try to show something that they are not, just to impress guys and to seduce women!!!!  Smile

P.S.: This guy i met had even a false company ID (to prove his truth...).'.



Member of the all mighty Canudos Air Force!!!!
User currently offlineAcidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1875 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3565 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

You never know - the guy claiming to be a "FedEx pilot" may not really be a pilot and may just be saying that he is. A friend of mine went to a bar one night and listened to some guy ramble on to some girl how he was a pilot for Delta. So he mentioned that he was an airline employee too. This guy claimed to fly L1011's - at least 2 yrs after DL had gotten rid of the L1011! He claimed to have flown his DL L1011 into MSP that night - a destination that probably never existed for DL with the L1011 in any recent memory, oh and 2 yrs after DL had stopped flying the L1011 in the first place. He went on to talk about how his L1011 had PW engines on it - anyone who actually FLEW the L1011 would know that it only came with RR RB211's. And apparently his L1011 had a 2-man flight deck. My friend decided to leave this guy alone as if he had to fabricate a story like this to try to pick up this girl, he needed all the help he could get.


Ich haben zwei Platzspielen und ein Microphone
User currently offlineRdube90pilot From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 63 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3559 times:

As a corporate pilot I do have a genuine interest in aviation. However, I do it for a living and you will find that many of us who do don't give $.02 about the ins and outs of every AC out there. If you ask me about the planes I fly or have flown great, I'll fill you in on what you want to know. If it's a case of chatting while on a commercial flight about that specific AC, then I may come across as a "unknowledgeable" pilot but then again, why would I know everything about all airplanes.

I could spout off some basic IT terms and know what I'm talking about but does that make me a more knowledgeable IT guru than someone in the industry who does it full time?

Eric


User currently offlineAerobalance From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 4683 posts, RR: 46
Reply 8, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3546 times:

I'm a GA pilot and I work in the aviation industry, yet while flying in So-California airspace I still have trouble identifying all the various types of aircraft when notified by ATC on traffic call outs.............humbling


"Sing a song, play guitar, make it snappy..."
User currently offlineAa767400 From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 2401 posts, RR: 26
Reply 9, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3525 times:

All the time! The Flight Attendants I work with, always say such ridiculous things. One time this F/A told me that SA)">DL has a large fleet of A340s. I said no, and that they never had a A340s ever. She looked at me and said that she knows what she is taking about.  Laugh out loud

Once I had a SA)">NW F/A on board, And said to me how SA)">AA has many more DC9s then SA)">NW. Now, I know that the S80 is also under DC9-81, and DC9-82. I told her it was a MD-80, and that it was not a DC-9. But, she said other wise.

The most common error in most Cabin Crew, Pilots and Attendants. Is that they seem to have flown on a airline that never flew, nor does presently fly to a certain destination. Like the Pilot how told me he took SA)">AA to CPT, non-stop from MIA. I said to him it was SA. He said it was not, and that it was a SA)">AA indeed. Can't argue with a pilot.



"The low fares airline."
User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3513 times:

The thing is though, all the stuff you guys mention.....aircraft types, liveries, routes....none of that is really of any importance to pilots or other industry professionals. There is such a massive amount in aviation that nobody can know it all or can be interested in it all, so these professionals must concentrate on the things that are part of their job. Airline pilots defiantely have more knowledge to things aviation related than probably all of the people (non-pilots) who have responded to this thread put together, but it is knowledge about things that are actually important.

User currently offlineNonrvsmdmf From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 186 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3507 times:

Occasionally we get some interesting questions from pilots.

The one that stumps me is when they ask what "trop" is on
the flight plan. When I have to explain to a pilot what the
tropopause is, I have to wonder.



I did not forget...I just misplaced the thought...
User currently offlineBrettbrett21 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 436 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3494 times:

Acidradio

Big deal...when talking to girls in clubs I've been just about everything from aircraft engineer to trainee pilot!!

Brett  Big grin



i'm so excited i wish i could wet my pants!
User currently offlineBENNETT123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7809 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3479 times:

I think that there are a number of basic points here;

Firstly, no man or woman can be an expert on all aspects of aviation. Although you would expect someone who makes his career in a certain field to have a good general knowledge.

Secondly, a lot of people BS. I am an astronaut, (in my dreams). Just some people let the dreams take over, or see some advantage in lying.

Finally, there are some real goons out there. I know in my own business that people sometimes say things that make you wince. This is either that they are saying something that is clearly wrong, or that they try to talk their way out of corner by digging themselves a deeper hole.



User currently offlineJeffDCA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3440 times:

Pe@rson,

One assumes that pilots decided on that career because they were interested in aviation... and more than just a passing interest. I can't imagine someone paying so much money to train without being quite fascinated.

You'd be surprised! I have come across some fully qualified pilots who can't tell a 777 from an A330.

Cheers,

Jeff


User currently offlineBENNETT123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7809 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3433 times:

Jeff

I hope that they are not A330 or 777 pilots.

That would be worrying.


User currently offlineJeffDCA From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3423 times:

Not yet  Big grin

Cheers,

Jeff


User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17178 posts, RR: 66
Reply 17, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3421 times:

I could spout off some basic IT terms and know what I'm talking about but does that make me a more knowledgeable IT guru than someone in the industry who does it full time?

I work in the IT industry but I'm pretty clueless about a lot of it. Just like IT, aviation is a big field and nobody knows it all.


I am an astronaut, (in my dreams).

***gasp*** You're not? And my friend told me she wanted your number Big grin




"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineMandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6965 posts, RR: 76
Reply 18, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3330 times:

Tried to ever explain what EPR is to a pilot who never flew anything other than the 733/4/5?

After he had a discussion with me on EPR, he was on a groundstop, stepped out of his plane, went into a 732 parked next to his 733, talked to his flight academy classmate who was the captain for that 732 and asked... "I got a friend who talked to me about EPR last night... he said U got them on the 732."
His friend said... "Where the hell have you been?"
That night my friend called me back and said... "After 5000hrs, you still learn new things about your job!"

Mandala499



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2469 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3309 times:

I am a GA pilot, with an interest in airplanes and work for Cessna. However the aviation industry has many aspects and airplanes are highly technical products. I couldn't tell you a Cessna 180 from a 185, or which engines are on a Model 425 off the top of my head.
People within the industry tend to specialize in a specific areas such as engineering (design, analysis, test), marketing, manufacturing, etc. Even within engineering, the various technical disciplines may know very little about other disciplines.

The topic reminds me of a AA 767 first officer I know. He told me once that he was flying the 767, but was qualified in both the 767 and 757 via simulators. I asked him how he liked the 757. He said he had never flown one, and had never even been in one as a passenger. Yet he was fully qualified to fly one. Imagine talking to a pilot who is fully qualified to fly a 757, yet has never stepped foot inside the cabin.
Would you believe him?



Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17178 posts, RR: 66
Reply 20, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 3285 times:

Sure I would believe him. Many F/Os do their first flight in a new type in the right seat in revenue service. Simulators are pretty good nowadays.


"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineWing From Turkey, joined Oct 2000, 1575 posts, RR: 24
Reply 21, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3239 times:

Citationjet,
I am a 737-400/800 pilot.After I finished the ground school and the simulator for -400 I was called by the chief pilot and told that I've been selected for the -800(which was added new to the fleet back in 2001) so I went back ground school to take the differences training and the differences simulator I was assigned to fly -800 for the next 2 months. After that I finally-happily-saw that my flight that day was with a -400.If someone ever asked to compare the two during that period,my answer would be the same "I have never flown one"

Mandala499,
I don't want to sound difficult here but the A pilot with 5000 + hours of B737 flight should have at least heard what EPR is.I haven't flown anything other than 7374/800 which uses N1 as engine indications and I have never used an EPR indicated engine but atleast I "heard" about it.And I don't have 5000 hours yet  Smile

For the original poster,ourboeing;

I don't know what picture you have in mind about an airline pilot but we are not supposed to know anything other than we are required to.I am not a 757 pilot so I don't care what type of engines it has,most others doesn't care either.I learned last year what ECAM is from one of my buddy who flies the A321,who cares, my airplane doesn't have one anyway.Anything other than I am supposed to know is my personal interest and I shouldn't be judged if I don't know.

I really didn't get what you are trying to achieve when you know the engine type of 757 better than a FedEx pilot?Or you know heavies more than a corporate pilot?What is your point here?






Widen your world
User currently offlineSleepyflyboy From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 73 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3190 times:

dude... sounds like someone just wanted to get off on "knowing" more then a pilot. ok so for example if you were flying on a delta B-757 and were seated next to a dead heading pilot who was going back home after work do you really think you would know more then him? like...

pressure in the hydraluic systems? norm, high, low fuel flow indications? oil quantity required to make the annunciators eluminate? voltage in the electrical systems? amperes from the batteries? the percentage of bypass in that make/model jet? the type of fly-by-wire system used? how many computers run the F_B_W system and which one will be used as the backup? which computer feeds what instruments? which computer when being used as a back up will feed what instruments? if the a/c has a radar altimeter? at what altitudes will the GPWS sound or the distance you have between a TCAS target? the type, style, operation of the landing gear system? the size, type, and inflation of the tires?

the pilot of any aircraft will know that aircraft like the back of his/her hand. if you are talking to a 757 pilot deadheading on a 737... he wont know the plane but he would still know "his" plane. we dont go to a grueling class when we are hired for fun.... we actually have to know that ish



kick the tires and light the fires
User currently offlineTasha From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (10 years 3 months 3 weeks ago) and read 3161 times:

I have to say that I totally love this thread!!  Big thumbs up Yes I do!! I love to use that British expression "chatted-up" Big grin I got "chatted-up" by this guy while traveling from Frankfurt to Berlin via DB's ICE train. He told me that he is a f/o for Lufthansa and flies the DC10. Having an avid interest in aviation I listened a bit closer as he told me that he loves the power of those two large engines and that it's one of the new models just a year old.

I really hated to do it. I guess I wasn't being too ladylike either actually at the time. But I just burst out laughing, and couldn't control myself... and was barely able to tell him that the DC10 has three engines and has been out of production for over a decade, and that I don't believe LH uses the DC10 at all anymore even in its cargo operations, all during fits of laughter. He turned all colors of red and fled the car. I felt so bad afterwards though, as he was really a sweet guy I think, and I wanted to apologize to him because I was rather rude. Unfortunately, I didn't see him again.

I will never, ever claim that I will know more than a pilot about aircraft, aviation, or flying in general - but I will say that I know more than your typical blonde and can almost immediately spot guys that try to impress me by saying that they are pilots when they are not. My Father is a pilot, and I have been around pilots all my life. They have a certain way of speaking - especially concerning aviation - which is familiar. I would much rather talk to someone who is truthful about his profession: If your a cook, banker, or diesel mechanic - then say so; don't tell me your a pilot.

Tasha  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

[Edited 2004-09-04 05:30:01]

User currently offlineHmmmm... From Canada, joined May 1999, 2109 posts, RR: 5
Reply 24, posted (10 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 3130 times:

There are more phonies out there, and in here, claiming to be pilots than one can shake a stick at. I kid you not. I have been here since the beginning, and I have come across them again and again. Out there, you will come across them, too. Some of the phony pilots have done their homework. Many have not bothered.


An optimist robs himself of the joy of being pleasantly surprised
25 Post contains images CrossChecked : One assumes that pilots decided on that career because they were interested in aviation Yeah! £100k + a year in the bank for working two days a week
26 Post contains images Ourboeing : Well..Well!! This thread has become very interesting. I have been interested in aviation since I was a child but didn't really get into it till I was
27 JAXpax : Just because you know something you think is basic in aviation that somebody in the industry doesn't know doesn't mean that 1.) it's important to ever
28 DeltaSFO : Has anyone ever had a conversation with a pilot and felt that you know more about airplanes that he/she does? Well, let me assure you, you don't.
29 Scootertrash : It is a question of priorities. When I was younger, wasn't married and didn't have kids, I could tell all about every airplane on the ramp... And I do
30 Post contains links SLCPilot : Here's my great brush with an aviator telling a tale. I was doing line-service at a now defunct airport in the Houston area and a new tennent told nea
31 Backfire : If you want to talk shop with people who know a shedload about aviation, get chatting with a bunch of aviation journalists. The combined knowledge of
32 Post contains images L-188 : Considering I work as a dispatcher at a charter air carrier. I DO KNOW MORE THEN THE DAMM PILOTS!!!!
33 Daedalus : What really scares me is when pilots cant figure out their outbound fuel load. At times I'll ask the F/O or Capt., depending on whoever is doing the p
34 IL76TD : yea, seriously, no offense, but other than the actual pilots on here, none of you have a clue about "aviation". You all know about airplanes, and airl
35 AirframeAS : My encounter was not with a pilot but with a so-called F/A. The story goes like this: I met (not in person, thank god!) on a MSN CityChat room a girl
36 Post contains images Wing : Considering I work as a dispatcher at a charter air carrier. I DO KNOW MORE THEN THE DAMM PILOTS!!!! L-188, Wake up man,you were talking in your sleep
37 Iairallie : EnoreFilho, If someone shows you a fake airline ID you should seriously consider reporting that person to the crew, the TSA, FAA, CAA, FBI, local poli
38 Lnglive1011yyz : The difficult thing I find is actually NOT being a pilot, or someone in the field, but having read a lot to know "enough". Standing around spotting wi
39 Post contains images Tasha : IL76TD: "You all know about airplanes, and airlines, but when it comes to "aviation", ie the actual act of flying, most of you really are clueless. I
40 Wing : What really scares me is when pilots cant figure out their outbound fuel load. At times I'll ask the F/O or Capt., depending on whoever is doing the p
41 Post contains images L-188 : Wing, it is part of the job description Actually what we need are a couple of A&P's to pop in and explain to you all about pilots-mechanic relations.
42 Post contains images Wing : L-188, Thank you but I don't need any explanations from A&P's.I am interracting them everyday.We conduct our relations based on respect and understan
43 Ourboeing : DeltaSFO, I am sure I know more than you do so take the chill pill. OURBOEING
44 Aa717driver : I'm sure dispatchers know much more about the "trop" and all that meterology stuff than I do. But all they can do(and they do a great job of it) is gi
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
"i Know More About Aviation Then You..." posted Tue Apr 27 2004 23:16:42 by Espion007
Back Again: You Know You Are An Aviation Geek When posted Tue Apr 29 2003 02:09:03 by AA61hvy
You Know You're An Aviation-enthusiast When... posted Thu May 2 2002 01:41:09 by Jofa
You Know You're An Aviation Fan When... posted Sat Jul 1 2000 23:17:28 by Jon
Did You Know Greyhound Had An Airline posted Sun Oct 8 2006 19:58:02 by 747400sp
US Airways- More Of A Brand Than An Airline... posted Sat Mar 19 2005 04:56:48 by SonOfACaptain
Does aviation use more "gas" than worldwide car and trucks? posted Sun Mar 6 2005 20:16:05 by Dandy_don
More Pax Than In An A380 posted Tue Feb 22 2005 04:53:23 by ZRH
How Much Aviation History Do You Know? posted Fri May 14 2004 17:09:59 by LGB Photos
Hijackings: More Common Than You'd Think posted Mon Jan 5 2004 06:30:56 by Jhooper