Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
"They're Looking In The Wrong Places!"  
User currently offlineZippyjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 5478 posts, RR: 13
Posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3240 times:

I've read and responded to the previous threads regarding ABC-TV's science fiction series Lost. The title of this thread is a quote from the captain who met his demise by being sucked out of his cockpit by an unseen creature in the jungle. Forgive me if this has been asked/covered before but:

1. Are there any true incidences of an airliner crashing on an uncharted island, the Amazon or some other remote locale and, the passengers and crew presumed dead? (since WWII) Where the wreckage was never found? But, years later discovered and rescued? I'm excluding the prop plane that crashed in the Andes where the survivors had to eat the dead to stay alive.

2. Could it happen today, even with global satellites?

3. Though it is TV and a product of the writer's imagination, engines of a downed jet still spooling is a little off course to say the least. Fuel lines and of course the cockpit was severed.

4. Getting back to Lost, I believe that over the course of the next few weeks, more recollections will be made regarding the crash with scenes of the airliner plummeting toward obscurity. The scene where the aft cabin/tail section breaks away in mid-air.

BTW, I enjoyed the reviews of my fellow A-Netters. True, the aviation scenes were about as authentic as a propeller plane starring in the 1950's cinematic tour de force "Jet Over The Atlantic." But, this series sure as hell beats the crap they currently air on TV. It is not about some wimpy yuppies who work and live in New York and work in the media. It is not starring a blow hard pompous bilionaire with perpetual bad hair days. And, thank God, it is not about poor schmuck on hurl inducing videos doing stupid things or scantily clad people chowing down on larva and goat innards!
 Big thumbs up


I'm Zippyjet & I approve of this message!
6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently onlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29791 posts, RR: 58
Reply 1, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3227 times:

1. Actually the USFS had one in Montana this week.

Thought all seven where dead, turned out two where alive but burned.

Actually think about there is a book by Larry Kanuit (Who wrote the Alaska Bear tale books) about Alaska survival stories and I think there are a couple in there about people who had been given up on and found. One guy in particular took off from the lake by my house, flew to a remote island set it down and had the plane flip, which of course sank the ELT, he was out for quite a few days before another guy on a hunting trip just happend to land on the lake and find him.

2, Yes it can happen today, although the required ELT should prevent most of them.

3. Well in theory a let engine can run until it runs out of fuel or air but continuing to run after a jar like that is laying it on a bit thick.



OBAMA-WORST PRESIDENT EVER....Even SKOORB would be better.
User currently offlineAeronuts From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 114 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3191 times:

Sure why not. The pacific ocean is a pretty big place with lot's of islands. Indonesia alone has over 1000+ islands.

As for global satellites?? Most "looking" global satellites are looking over where people live. It a waste of "looking" satellite assets to look over the pacific, unless you're the Navy, then they're looking for "bigger" thing than down aircraft in lost island. As for commercial imaging satellite like Landsat and etc... there a problem known as resolution.. a plane is a pretty small object from orbit, even low earth orbit.

Hollywood satellites are famous for tracking peoples or planes from orbit.


User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3607 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3180 times:

2, Yes it can happen today, although the required ELT should prevent most of them.

It couldn't really happen on a regularly scheduled airline flight. These all fly under IFR, most are guided by GPS and the remainder guided by VOR on a published flight plan. You'd have to basically fly off course on purpose and hope that none of the controllers notice (in some parts of the world there's no radar coverage, but you'd still have to either do it on purpose or you'd have to really have no idea what you're doing as a pilot, and your first offcer would have to be just as negligent).

This is just as true of foreign carriers as US carriers. I just can't see how you could ever get 1,000 miles off course these days unless you meant to.

3. Though it is TV and a product of the writer's imagination, engines of a downed jet still spooling is a little off course to say the least. Fuel lines and of course the cockpit was severed.

Engines can be running at pretty high RPM (especially in a situation where a pilot's trying to regain control) and if there's no real impact against the engine itself it's possible that the fan assembly could still be spinning at a high RPM after the crash. I don't honestly know of a specific case in which it's happened but what stops the fan from spinning after a crash is the impact of the fan assembly against the ground, the water, or various other engine parts. If none of those things stop the fan from spinning, it's not going to stop immediately.

I don't know how this was handled in Lost (I missed this scene) but it sounds similar to what they did in Cast Away, and while that was obviously a little over-dramatized for film I don't remember having a major problem with the way that was shot. I think the way they shot it, it seemed like the airplane was basically intact, the pilots killed and the airplane fuselage flooded but with the wings still attached and all control and fuel lines to the engines still intact also, so the engines kept running until they actually submerged (then they blew for whatever reason). I'm not sure if this could actually happen but it seemed plausible, at least.


[Edited 2004-09-24 08:45:25]


I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineHoya From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 389 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days ago) and read 3124 times:

Regarding the running engine, I've heard about a crash involving a DC-10 and a running engine. Somewhere in the U.S., a DC-10 overran a runway and ended up in shallow water. The cockpit was severed from the rest of the plane, but the tail engine(#2 engine?) kept running, delaying rescue efforts for a short while. I think they had to wait for the engine to run out of fuel for it to stop since there was no way to stop it. As long as there is fuel flowing and no damage, an engine will keep running. I looked through airdisaster.com, and I think this may be the crash, though they don't mention anything about the engines. I heard about the crash from one of those "when airliners go down" type tv shows.

http://www.airdisaster.com/cgi_bin/view_details.cgi?date=01231982®=N113WA&airline=World+Airways



Hoya Saxa!!
User currently offlineAeronuts From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 114 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 10 months 5 days ago) and read 3121 times:

You're just stating a case for those Hollywood writers to do a better job writing the script. There have been incidents were the aircraft went off course for quite a distance...like the lost of cabin pressure that killed a golfer, and the A-10 that flew across the country and crashed.

User currently offlineMxCtrlr From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 2485 posts, RR: 35
Reply 6, posted (9 years 10 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 2977 times:

3. Though it is TV and a product of the writer's imagination, engines of a downed jet still spooling is a little off course to say the least. Fuel lines and of course the cockpit was severed.

Back in the late 70's to early 80's at MIA, a cargo CV-880 overran the runway and the engine control cables were severed with all four running at full throttle and unable to be shut down. The crew escaped but airport officials had to go and kill the "passengers" (a plane load of cattle) because they were loose walking around the crash site with the engines running at full steam. What a mess!

MxCtrlr  Smile/happy/getting dizzy
Freight Dogs Anonymous - O.O.T.S.K.  Smokin cool



DAMN! This SUCKS! I just had to go to the next higher age bracket in my profile! :-(
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
FedEx In The Movie "Castaway" posted Sat Nov 11 2006 16:15:07 by Shinkai
"Excuse Me, But You're Sitting In My Seat!" posted Sat Feb 19 2000 05:30:47 by Boeing 777
Luggages In The Wrong Plane posted Mon Oct 27 2003 11:13:15 by Icarus75
Do They Speak French In The French Cockpits? posted Sat Mar 30 2002 12:52:19 by Pressclub
Pic In The Wrong Location! posted Sat Dec 22 2001 02:45:59 by 9V-SVE
What "graveyard" Did They Use In The Movie Swat? posted Thu Dec 4 2003 20:14:37 by Moolies
How To "Make Up Time" In The Air posted Sun Jun 25 2006 02:04:09 by TWAtwaTWA
When Will We See A B787 "In The Flesh"? posted Thu May 25 2006 17:39:35 by Speedmarque
Eads Recognise "mistakes" In The Past (A350) posted Sat May 13 2006 16:56:48 by ElGreco
What Is "su" & "se" In The E-170? posted Sat Dec 24 2005 22:23:48 by NY-JFK-LGA