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Canadian Flying Schools  
User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1776 times:

I have a couple of questions.
I am about to move to the Toronto area under the entrepreneur-immigration program.
I already had a medical done for my flight lessons ,which where supposed to begin this year in Belgium ,and was found to be okay.

-Where can I find a good Toronto area flight school (with a link if possible)?
-Can Canadian pilot licenses be used in the US unrestricted?
-Can I follow lessons as a Canadian resident but non-citizen and obtain a valid license?
-How about medical requirements, are they much different from here (Belgium)?
-Can I fly with a Canadian License in Europe?
-What is the quickest (save offcourse) possible term I use to get my license?

PS I want to have a valid license for a Beech-Baron (twin engine) type of plane.
Which license(s) do I need for this and how long thus it minimally take to obtain them?


[edit post]
11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJamesvf84 From Switzerland, joined Sep 2003, 129 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1762 times:

Hello Arniepie

I had a great experience when flying out of Toronto Island airport. The flying school there was great, plus the fact that they have 3 runways that almost form a triangle! The view is spectactular as you come into land over water.

The flight school was called Island Air if I am not mistaken. I have the info at home should you require more info.

James


User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 1750 times:

Hello Arniepie

I had a great experience when flying out of Toronto Island airport. The flying school there was great, plus the fact that they have 3 runways that almost form a triangle! The view is spectactular as you come into land over water.

The flight school was called Island Air if I am not mistaken. I have the info at home should you require more info.

James


Yes please,do forward me the info, do they have a website?

Toronto Island airport= The one near CN-tower, CYTZ???



[edit post]
User currently offlineOlympus69 From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 1737 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1682 times:

Hi Arniepie,

Island Air, located at Toronto City Centre Airport - CYTZ, does indeed have a web site - www.flyislandair.net. I didn't explore the site but it seems to have all the information you need - including prices. It also lists their phone number.


User currently offlineBeechNut From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 731 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1674 times:

If you're hoping to fly a Beech Baron you've got quite a long and $$$ road ahead.

You will need at a minimum a private pilot licence and a multi-engine rating. A PPL in Canada is a minimum 40 hours of ground school, and 45 hours flight training plus a written exam and flight test. A more realistic number though is 50-60 hours before you'll feel ready to pass the flight test; that's pretty much the average.

A multi-engine rating is a flight test as well. And the lower your qualifications, the longer it will take (hours). Figure at least 15 hours of training to get the multi rating.

However, passing directly into a twin with a fresh PPL is not likely to happen. You should realistically expect to get checked out and build experience on a complex single first (variable pitch prop and retractable gear, 200 hp+). A twin will be twice as complex in normal flight, and more than a handful in an engine-out emergency.

Even with a PPL and a check out on a complex single, no insurance company will be ready to insure you with much less than 15-20 hours on type and remember, we're still only talking single-engine here. I know this from the experience of one of our fellow flying club members. An insurance company is highly unlikely to insure you on a twin unless you have a commercial licence or are a high-time PPL.

With a PPL don't expect to fly a Baron for hire. Or anything else for that matter. In Canada that requires a commercial licence which requires a minimum of 200 hours total time and 100 PIC, plus 40 more hours of ground school, and 65 further hours of training. Plus a ton of other regulations on the carrying of fare-paying passengers.

If you're really rich and can afford to fly every day you can probably pile up the hours quickly enough. But you will still need to fly the Baron with a qualified safety pilot until the insurance company is ready to insure you. Without insurance it is illegal to fly in Canada.

And don't expect to find anyone willing to rent you a Baron in Canada. If you're really lucky you might find a beat-up Aztec or Seneca to rent. Be prepared to pay handsomely and also ensure you have the hours.

A better route would probably be to go the the US and enroll in one of those flight academys. There are a couple in Canada run by community colleges but it's probably easier to get into a US program if you have the funds.

Mike


User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 1663 times:

Thanks for the info you all.

Beechnut,
Hearing you I might as well look for one of those US-academy's.
Probably doing my PPL in Canada and afterwards continuing in the States, maybe in a Chicago area school if I can find one.
I assume ,by your answer ,that license commonality is not an issue between US and Canada.
There is no point in buying an expensive Baron-like toy without the correct "driving" licenses



[edit post]
User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 1650 times:

Going from a Canadian License to a US license is just a matter of filling out an FAA form, but if you get your PPL in the US, you have to do a lot of work to get your Canadian PPL, essentially doing all of the work over again...they give anyone a PPL in the US, its not as easy here in Canada...If you have the option I would do everything here, and then go fly down there...there are some flying academies and schools offering program here...Brampton flying club has one on their website....http://www.flybrampton.com


"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineJamesvf84 From Switzerland, joined Sep 2003, 129 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 1649 times:

Sorry for the late reply Arniepie...offline there for sometime!

As Olympus quoted for the website, Island Air was the school I went to. As for it being near the CN tower you are right! That what makes it so spectacular especially when doing touch and goes! Almost makes you feel like you are some heavy coming into land at HKG!

Also there was a bit of prop traffic, a few Dash-8s from Air Canada (Air Ontario maybe) that took off occasionally! Also great when you are holding for the clearence and they are in the queue behind you waiting as well!

I could not have picked a better spot!

James


User currently offlineArniepie From Belgium, joined Aug 2005, 1265 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 1631 times:

A thousand thanks to you all!!!

After reading through the brampton-site I think I'm going with that one, they even do Twin-engines as far as I can see (PIPER Seminole)

BTW Excellent website, only question I have is ,how far are they from Toronto?



[edit post]
User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1617 times:

Depends on where you are in Toronto...they are about 20mins drive from pearson airport if thats any help...I did some training there, and I have to say they do have a great thing going there, the airplanes are always kept in great flying condition, and the instructors are fairly good. They only downside is the annual membership fee that they charge, but its not all that bad.

It is the busiest uncontrolled airport in Canada at the moment, so you get a lot of practice in a busy airport before moving on to the busy controlled fields....



"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineCaptainGomes From Canada, joined Feb 2001, 6413 posts, RR: 55
Reply 10, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 1598 times:

Choosing a flying school in the Toronto area really depends on a few factors, namely where you will be residing. If you are going to be in the downtown core, then the island airport is your best bet. If you are going to be in the suburbs, then driving down there, paying for parking, and paying for the ferry really adds up. Plus, once the last ferry leaves, you don't have any way out, so that limits the amount of night flying you can do in the summer.

I personally fly out of Burlington Airpark. http://www.spectrumairways.com is the flight school there. It is a small and friendly atmosphere, and not too far if you will be in the west end. They also have enough aircraft available so that bookings aren't too much of a big deal, as is not always the case elsewhere. Otherwise try http://www.torontoairways.com at Buttonville Airport, which is good if you are in the east end.

Whatever you end up doing, good luck and have fun!



"it's kind of like an Airbus, it's an engineering marvel, but there's no sense of passion" -- J. Clarkson re: Coxster
User currently offlineOlympus69 From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 1737 posts, RR: 7
Reply 11, posted (10 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1571 times:

There are a couple of advantages to flying at the Island - though not in the early learning stages. Being a Tower controlled airport you get plenty of practice with radio procedures. Being right on the lakeshore, weather conditions are sometimes unusual at times - particularly winds. I can remember having a tail wind on final until I got down to 200 feet, where it switched to a headwind. I can also remember one occasion where we started approaches on 3 different runways because the wind direction was changing so rapidly.

In my days there (35 years ago) they had reduced rates on the ferry for students.

If you do night flying there the views are spectacular.



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