Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
The Latest Lawsuit: "I'm Not Showing My ID!"  
User currently offlineNonRevKing From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8589 times:

***Sigh***

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=676&ncid=676&e=2&u=/usatoday/20041011/ts_usatoday/airlineidrequirementfaceslegalchallenge

Only in America would someone tie up the legal system to make things more convienent for them, regardless of what everyone else thinks.

My favorite part:

Last year, before taking off on a British Airways flight from San Francisco to London, Gilmore angered fellow travelers by refusing to remove a blue button on his lapel that had the words "suspected terrorist" imposed over the picture of an airliner. After a delay, the pilot went back to the gate and ordered Gilmore off the jet.

Ah if only we had a "loser pays" system...

B



47 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineN754PR From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8478 times:

Its a joke that comes up every month....... "If I was an American I could have sued you for that  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7785 posts, RR: 16
Reply 2, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8437 times:

As far back as I can remember presenting ID at check-in was always a requirement. So whether it is an airline employee or a TSA employee doing it I fail to see how this is a new intrusion into my personal privacy and right to travel freely throughout the country.

If Gilmore wants to fight for privacy rights perhaps he should be fighting private corporations and their selling of personal information. Frankly loosely regulated private entities scare me a lot more than the government.



Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlineBCAL From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 3384 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8416 times:

And next story is that Gilmore does not wish to show his car licence number, as that is an infringement of his rights to move freely in his car around the country too!

Any senisble Judge will throw the case out before it goes to hearing...Will they?






MOL on SRB's latest attack at BA: "It's like a little Chihuahua barking at a dying Labrador. Nobody cares."
User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7414 posts, RR: 50
Reply 4, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8415 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

How textbook is it that this clown gets to his case heard by the 9th Circiut Court of Appeals. Those idiots award more frivelous cases than any other appellete court


Made from jets!
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8412 times:

As far back as I can remember presenting ID at check-in was always a requirement.

Actually, it's fairly recent. My last stint working the ticket counter for CO was in '94, and we didn't require ANYONE to show ID. People were traveling on other peoples' tickets all the time. Only if they were stupid and told us this did they not go. We did start requiring ID at the gate prior to 9/11, but not much before that.

As for Mr. Gilmore, if you don't show me ID when checking in or at the security checkpoint, then you don't go. It's that simple. Don't like it? Don't fly.


User currently offlineSsides From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 21
Reply 6, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8384 times:

As for Mr. Gilmore, if you don't show me ID when checking in or at the security checkpoint, then you don't go. It's that simple. Don't like it? Don't fly.

Exactly. His right to travel is not being violated at all. Nothing is stopping him from traveling by car, boat, train, bus, ox-cart, etc. Yes, there is a right to travel in the US Constitution, but there's not an explicit right to travel by air.



"Lose" is not spelled with two o's!!!!
User currently offlineDesertJets From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 7785 posts, RR: 16
Reply 7, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8385 times:

Alpha,... err Falcon. In my defense I can't remember very far back. But I do remember needing to show ID on TWA in 96 and on CO and HP on check-in during the late 90s... perhaps it varied from station to station.


Stop drop and roll will not save you in hell. --- seen on a church marque in rural Virginia
User currently offlinePROSA From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 5644 posts, RR: 4
Reply 8, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8357 times:

While the ID requirements probably does virtually nothing in terms of deterring terrorism, it's such a minor intrusion that I cannot understand why anyone would object.


"Let me think about it" = the coward's way of saying "no"
User currently offlineAa777flyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8303 times:

Mr. Gilmore is right, he has the right no NOT show his ID. He also has the right to stay home and not travel. He has the right to charter his own jet. (which it sounds as though he can afford) He has the right to drive to his destination. He has the right to be an idot!

I am glad that there are manditory ID checks. Safety Security First. People have to realize that they must give up some rights if they with to exercise the PRIVILAGE of traveling by air.

[Edited 2004-10-11 17:24:36]

User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 8303 times:

While the ID requirements probably does virtually nothing in terms of deterring terrorism, it's such a minor intrusion that I cannot understand why anyone would object.

It is more for making sure that who is named on the ticket is flying. I can't understand why we didn't always do this. Imagine, if a plane crashed, and it was reported that John Doe was among the dead, when, in fact, Mr. Doe gave his ticket to Archie Bunker, and LGW-Luftfahrtgesellschaft Walter (Germany)">HE is the one that died, but his name doesn't show on the manifest? Another lawsuit, right there.

It's just common sense.


User currently offlineS12PPL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 8143 times:

What I love is he wears a button that says "Suspected Terrorist." Since when did anyone say he was a suspected terrorist, simply because he is required to show ID?? Yes, part of the ID requirement is to ensure you aren't on the watch list. But the other part of it is to ensure you are who you say you are, and are traveling on the correct ticket. This mistake even happens post 9/11. In 2003 I was working the ticket counter and had a pair of sisters checking in for Tuscon. One of them said she had a strange situation. One of the sister's husband's couldn't make the trip at the last minute, and for some reason in TUS, her sister was checked in and traveled on her HUSBAND'S ticket! I looked, and sure enough, her sisters PNR showed she hadn't flown out of TUS, and her brother in law had used half his itenerary. So this sister in TUS had slipped past the counter agent, the TSA, and the gate agent, and it didn't seem odd that her name wasn't Robert to any of the 5+ people that checked her ID between the counter and the gate. Plus, at her transfer point, the gate agent THERE missed it.

User currently onlineMaverickM11 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 17659 posts, RR: 46
Reply 12, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 8133 times:

"there is a right to travel in the US Constitution"

Really? I've noticed lately a lot of people like to make up "rights" that don't exist anywhere but in people's heads.



E pur si muove -Galileo
User currently offlineZrs70 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 3181 posts, RR: 9
Reply 13, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 8106 times:

ID's became necessary after TWA 800.


14 year airliners.net vet! 2000-2013
User currently offlineGarnetpalmetto From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 5404 posts, RR: 53
Reply 14, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 8061 times:


Any senisble Judge will throw the case out before it goes to hearing...Will they?


BCAL, that's how the issue is going up to the 9th Circuit. The trial judge threw the case out and the plaintiff chose to appeal that dismissal. Mind you, there's no guarantee the 9th Circuit will put the appeal on their docket, either. They could just as easily tell the guy to take a hike.



South Carolina - too small to be its own country, too big to be a mental asylum.
User currently offlineMdsh00 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4125 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 8043 times:

I have had to show my ID before flying prior to 9/11. It really is nothing new. Maybe he shouldn't show his ID when making a credit card purchase either.  Insane


"Look Lois, the two symbols of the Republican Party: an elephant, and a big fat white guy who is threatened by change."
User currently offlineJGPH1A From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 8020 times:

RE: Maybe he shouldn't show his ID when making a credit card purchase either.

I didn't know you had to. I've made hundreds of credit card purchases in the US and round the world, nobody has ever asked me for ID.


User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6204 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 8009 times:

He did say one thing I agree with:

Gilmore said the ID requirement does little to ensure security. "Ordinary citizens may show correct identification, but do we really think that someone who is willing to commit a terrorist act won't also be willing to present false identification?"




Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 18, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 7969 times:

.......At issue is Gilmore's claim that checking the IDs of passengers on domestic flights violates his right to travel throughout the USA anonymously, without the government monitoring him........

Hey buddy, just to let you know... When you BUY a ticket, YOUR NAME goes into the computer and is PRINTED on the ticket and printed on the FLIGHT MANAFEST.. so ANONMUS you are NOT. The airline is just making sure the person that's name is on the ticket is the person traveling........ O'hh and PS: Airlines have been doing this LONG before Sept 2001.




"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineJeb94 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 603 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 7939 times:

You know what Mr. Gilmore? You're free to travel all you want but flying is a priveledge that requires you do certain things and follow certain rules. If you don't follow those certain rules then the airline has the right to not do business with you. Anymore it seems more and more Americans have gotten it in their heads that rights and priveledges are the same. Its time the education system in America starts teaching much more about American the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and what they mean. Maybe then the sacrifices the members of our armed services make defending those rights would be better appreciated.

User currently offlineZvezda From Lithuania, joined Aug 2004, 10511 posts, RR: 64
Reply 20, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 7815 times:

DesertJets wrote:
"Frankly loosely regulated private entities scare me a lot more than the government."

You're entitled to be scared by whatever scares you, but governments have murdered perhaps a million times more people than private corporations have.


User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 21, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 7744 times:

I'm all for this. While I have no problem with showing my ID, I do have a problem with the manner in which the TSA conducts itself in general.

It takes freaks on both sides to end up with a moderate approach to anything.

N


User currently offlineBritPilot777 From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2004, 1075 posts, RR: 2
Reply 22, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 7626 times:

I thought passengers always had to show their ID when travelling domestically?? Here in England you still need your passport to travel domestically just as a form of ID.


Forever Flight
User currently offlineMiamix707 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 23, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 7362 times:

I didn't know you had to. I've made hundreds of credit card purchases in the US and round the world, nobody has ever asked me for ID

That could very well depend in which city you're in, at least in the USA. It's also possible everybody thought you were Superman. However you can go to Orlando florida for example and never be asked for ID when making a credit card purchase, but go further south to Miami and be asked for ID everytime.

You're entitled to be scared by whatever scares you, but governments have murdered perhaps a million times more people than private corporations have

It's understandable, you are from Lithuania which used to be part of the Soviet Union. But it also sounds like something a 1st grader would say.


User currently offlineAirEMS From United States of America, joined May 2004, 684 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (10 years 1 week 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 7243 times:

My question is if he has "Multiple Millions" then why is he flying commerically?
 Smile/happy/getting dizzy



If Your Dying Were Flying
25 Post contains links Burnsie28 : At work we only ask for a ID when a Credit/Debit card are not signed, or the singnature is a little or a lot off from the credit/debit card. As for th
26 Okie : Actually, it's fairly recent. My last stint working the ticket counter for CO was in '94, and we didn't require ANYONE to show ID. People were traveli
27 Sevenair : yeah, only in america! in the UK, we have had to show ID for many many many many years due to several political issues. So for yanks I guess its a new
28 Magyar : Mr. Gilmore should not worry, soon he does not need to show any ID. There will be other safer and easier methods to ID one. Fingerprints at check-ins
29 Post contains images Aa767400 : What a freak! I mean, is this what this country is coming to? And the whole tag with suspected terrorist on it?
30 Deltaffindfw : The bad thing is that the 9th Circuit is known for stupid decision making. It's the "rogue" court in the US Appellate system.
31 Access-Air : Actually, I think that it wasnt until after TWA 800 that airlines took a heard line about showing proper ID...I have been a travel agent since 1989 an
32 Ckfred : Here are a few "legal" reasons why airline and airport security asking for ID is not an infringement of his Constitutional rights. If a person drives
33 FlyMIX : Mr. Gilmore is a jerk, and as many posts here have stated he has no case. However, what about the Terrorist "No Fly" list...that is more sinister. You
34 Fxra : I fail to see how showing an ID to a TSA agent allows one to be tracked by the government. Last I went through airport security (in sevral places), th
35 Cha747 : As far back as I can remember presenting ID at check-in was always a requirement. I distinctly remember airlines becoming more concerned about this du
36 Baw716 : We can call Mr. Gilmore what we like (jerk, nutcase, etc). That is not the real issue. The issue that he raises is that asking for him to show ID is a
37 Pilotpip : Flying is a privelege, not a right. If he wants to board somebody else's aircraft, he must abide by their rules. Just like driving. If you can't abide
38 Nudelhirsch : I sincerely apologize in advance, but why do Americans have to embarrass themsleves by making up stupid lawsuits and by fighting any regulation that r
39 Mizzou65201 : Two small points. For starters, the 9th Circuit bashing is somewhat uncalled for. It's a federal case because it raises constitutional issues, and the
40 JGPH1A : The requirement to show your driver's license to a traffic cop is NOT the same as having to prove your ID when travelling. You have to show your drive
41 Leskova : Out of curiosity - has there ever been a lawsuit where someone claimed that his rights were being curtailed by actually having to pay for his airline
42 VC-10 : but go further south to Miami and be asked for ID everytime I'm in Miami right now and have never been asked for an ID when paying by CC. In fact I ca
43 Luv2fly : Cha747 You are correct about when all the ID started. I remember at that time I was working as a travel agent and had a client or two get busted for t
44 UALPHLCS : I read this article yesterday in the paper and saw the photos of Gilmore. What drew my attention to the article was that he is pictured in front of a
45 UA744KSFO : Ckfred, Good legal analysis, and might I add that his whole contention is that by showing ID, the government is "monitoring his travel". But there is
46 Ckfred : UA744KSFO: As someone mentioned earlier, TSA really doesn't monitor travel movements, but the airlines certainly keep those records, simply for FF mil
47 Baw716 : JGPH1A Your assertion that having to show your ID to a traffic cop is not the same as presenting your ID when checking in or at security is not entire
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Mayrhuber: LH "Not In A Hurry" To Decide On 748I posted Tue Nov 14 2006 08:55:38 by Leelaw
The Latest From Our Favorite "free Thinkers" posted Sat May 8 2004 01:12:27 by Garnetpalmetto
G-REDX, The Ultimate Personal "Starship"? posted Tue Nov 21 2006 07:18:45 by DEVILFISH
CO "Order Of The Golden Dragon" Card? posted Mon Nov 20 2006 16:19:12 by Chase
"Fleet Commonality Does Not A Merger Make"... posted Thu Nov 16 2006 02:50:57 by Falcon flyer
"Out Of Chicken?" - Beat The F/A! AA 65 Incident posted Tue Sep 26 2006 14:58:50 by BWI757
The "Hijack-Proof Aircraft" Of The Future posted Wed Sep 20 2006 23:01:04 by Vio
Looking For "my" Airplane posted Tue Sep 19 2006 04:09:37 by SlimChance
"The 787 Family" posted Wed Jun 21 2006 05:42:09 by NWDC10
"The Red Tail" Movie posted Sun Apr 23 2006 15:10:26 by DTW757