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Continental 757 Winglets  
User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4321 posts, RR: 19
Posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 8347 times:

Anyone have any information on the status of Continental's flight test program for the winglets on the 757?

Haven't heard a thing inside the company beyond the hoped for range improvement conjecture. Any real results yet or have they not even started testing yet?


The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineFalcon84 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 8202 times:

I think the testing is going on now, or will in the near future.

If memory serves (and often, it doesn't  Smile ), the winglets will start to go on in the spring, just in time for the huge European expansion out of EWR and the CLE-LGW restart for summer.


User currently offlineClickhappy From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 9602 posts, RR: 69
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 8102 times:
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Last I heard from Aviation Partners was they weren't going to start testing until mid-2005.

User currently offlineArtsyman From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 4745 posts, RR: 34
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 7938 times:

Last I heard from Aviation Partners was they weren't going to start testing until mid-2005.
***

Ship 134 is the first 757 to get winglets. The testing is actually being done at Boeing, not by Continental. The two are sharing the costs of development in return for Continental getting a better rate on the product itself.

Boeing gains a 757 for testing, and Continental gains a better deal for giving up a 757 for the testing period.

When I last checked (about a month ago), Ship 134 was in Abbottsford, Canada having its D check. It was then scheduled to go into normal service for two weeks before heading up to Boeing for the winglet installation and testing period.

I would say that it is safe to say that the testing has begun.

Jeremy


User currently offlineEwr767 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 95 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 7690 times:

The 757 winglet wills begin to be installed in the spring of 05

User currently offlineNWADC9 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4896 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 7268 times:

757 winglets?!?!?!?!?!?!?! IS THERE ANY PLANE OUT THERE THAT CAN'T HAVE WINGLETS?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!?!?!?!? Big grin


Flying an aeroplane with only a single propeller to keep you in the air. Can you imagine that? -Capt. Picard
User currently offlineCaptoveur From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 7200 times:

No, Northwest is going to put winglets on their DC-9s next, instead of ordering 717s

User currently offlineUltrapig From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 581 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 6845 times:

I flew on swa out of phx yesterday and saw an array of winglet and non wingleted planes

Can pilots tell the difference when taking off or landing? And how long does the segment have to be for the fuel savings to be visible? Do pilots have to be specvially rated for winglets?


User currently offline7E72004 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3587 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 6795 times:

If NW wanted to put winglets on the DC-9s (which would look very strange) could they do it? Is it possible?


The next generation of aircraft is just around the corner!
User currently offlineDrerx7 From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5144 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 6756 times:

They probably could if there was a kit available--but there is no point; the DC9 is not a long range aircraft and winglets only are beneficial on long range sectors. Short hops incur more of a added weight penalty versus more efficient fuel burn.


Third Coast born, means I'm Texas raised
User currently offlineBigblack From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 600 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 6665 times:

Winglets are cool. They would rock on a 757


Someone special in the air
User currently offlineNBGskygod From United States of America, joined May 2004, 791 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 6465 times:

I am going to wait to pass judgement on the winglets for the 757. I didn't like the winglets on the 73NG for a while but they grew on me.


"I use multi-billion dollar military satellite systems to find tupperware in the woods."
User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2538 posts, RR: 51
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 6462 times:

winglets on a 757 would make it look like a Tu-204


The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlineLN-MOW From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 1908 posts, RR: 14
Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 6370 times:

SAS is considering winglets for their MD80's. This is, however, depending on how long they are going to keep them in their fleet. I understand a decision will be taken within the next few months.

This is however not something you just 'slap on'. They will have to be properly tested and certified, and this is a six-month process. Pretty much any type of aircraft can have winglets installed, APB is working to find a 767 launch customer, but there are of course some serious costs involved that has to be taken into consideration.




- I am LN-MOW, and I approve this message.
User currently offlineOptionsCLE From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 467 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 5 days ago) and read 5833 times:

winglets on a 757 would make it look like a Tu-204

More like a Tu-204 without winglets would look like a 757.  Insane Why is it that all of those aircraft look like Boeing or Airbus copies?


User currently offlineWJV04 From Canada, joined Jun 2001, 583 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 5491 times:

Winglets also help in climb performance, The 737NG winglets are like adding 50 feet of wing. Thus having to use less power during climbs. However it is true that the flights have to be a longer range for them to become most effective.

User currently offlineNosedive From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 23 hours ago) and read 5460 times:

Why is it that all of those aircraft look like Boeing or Airbus copies?

Unless the USSR had a time machine (in which case why didn't they win the Cold War) they could not have gotten plans to "copy" Boeing or Airbus.

Case in point the II-96, looks like an A340 doesn't it?
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Nevermind that the II-96 1st flew 1988 one year after Airbus started development of the A340! Airbus 1st flew the A340 series in 1991.


User currently offlineLtbewr From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13005 posts, RR: 12
Reply 17, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4612 times:

Isn't '134 one of the older 757's in their fleet? Are they only considering them on the ETOPS a/c's ? What are the projected fuel savings with winglets on a trans-ocean flight such as these units are proposed for?

User currently offlineCOrouter77 From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 28 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 4316 times:

a/c 134 is in the hanger in lax. will be there til the 1/dec. then it goes to air partner for another 3 wks. not sure when it will be back in service.

User currently offlineA319114 From Netherlands, joined Aug 2004, 541 posts, RR: 3
Reply 19, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 3935 times:

Of course all planes look a like, they all have fuselages, wings and engines...


Destruction leads to a very rough road but it also breeds creation
User currently offlineIahcsr From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 3393 posts, RR: 42
Reply 20, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3444 times:
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Ship 134 was delivered in early '99, and is the 34th of 41 CO 752s. The oldest is Ship 101, delivered May '94.


Working very hard to Fly Right....
User currently offlineAndrewuber From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2528 posts, RR: 41
Reply 21, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 3418 times:

Nosedive-

So you're saying the IL-86 was a breakthrough? By your comparison, don't these two aircraft look strikingly similar??  Insane

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I'd rather shoot BAD_MOTIVE
User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 957 posts, RR: 51
Reply 22, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 3410 times:

Can pilots tell the difference when taking off or landing? And how long does the segment have to be for the fuel savings to be visible? Do pilots have to be specvially rated for winglets?

Do the pilots notice the winglets on take-off? I think it would vary from pilot to pilot, but the winglets do let the 737NG reach cruise altitude faster.

How long does the segment need to be? WN states the winglet package begins to save fuel on any sector longer than 48 minutes, but it would likely change from airline to airline. A 73G* with IFE and gallies installed would be much heavier than WN's spartan 73G and would experience different savings. WN estimates they will save 92,000 gallons of fuel per aircraft annually... with a fleet of 200+ aircraft, they save huge amounts of fuel

Special rating for the winglets? No... the pilot certification is the exact same.


User currently offlineVikingair From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 100 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2972 times:

Icelandair reportedly is considering Winglets for their B-757's...

User currently offlineTJCAB From Canada, joined Oct 2004, 324 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 2855 times:

Nosedive

Keeping in mind that the IL 96 is a derivative of the IL 86 which first flew on the 22 December 1976...


User currently offlineNosedive From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 25, posted (9 years 8 months 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 2199 times:

Keeping in mind that the IL 96 is a derivative of the IL 86 which first flew on the 22 December 1976...

Yes, I am aware of this.

So you're saying the IL-86 was a breakthrough? By your comparison, don't these two aircraft look strikingly similar??

1) Did I say the 86 was a breakthrough? You can debate that all you want, but don't expect me to interact with you on that one. 2) I used the 96 in comparison to the 340 b/c both aircraft were developed closer in time than the 86 and the 340 than the 707 and the 340 (as provided by your example). 3) Going with my original point, how can an aircraft be copy another aircraft if that other aircraft isn't on the drawing board yet? Nevermind the fact the older aircraft is based upon a similar company aircraft.....(as mentioned by TJCAB) 4) For all we know my sarcasm meter is busted and this was all for nil. 5) As the 707 and 340 were developed in different eras, designed for different niches, and one is a narrowbody, I fail to see your point. Similar yes, but they cannot be passed off as "copies" b/c of the aforementioned differences.

Were saying the same thing; aircraft look may similar, but the vast majority of the time they are not copies. Similar aircraft that were developed around the same time appear that way for a few reasons. Market demands and technology of the time play significant roles- engine technology, for example. Common examples of "similar" aircraft include: the DC-8 and B707, the IL 86/96 and A340, the B727 and Tu154 , the IL114 and the Saab 340, etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. Whether or not anyone these examples look similar is irrelevant, as similarities and beauty are in the eye of the beholder, not to mention ambiguous. My point, same as yours, is that just b/c an aircraft looks like another does not mean it is a copy. There are many things that must be considered if an aircraft is a copy of another aircraft. All I'm saying


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