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The Definition Of 'general Aviation'  
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9168 posts, RR: 15
Posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 5178 times:

The meaning of the term 'general' is very broad. It can mean anything. So what is the exact definition of general aviation?

Flying schools, private jets etc etc I guess?

[Edited 2004-11-11 16:10:34]

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCancidas From Poland, joined Jul 2003, 4112 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 5169 times:

everything that falls under FAR part 91 regulations.


"...cannot the kingdom of salvation take me home."
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9168 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 5165 times:

I know FAR part 91 regulations......

Umm... but the term itself is a bit too broad I think.


User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5144 times:

I suppose that the technical defination would be activities that are regulated under FAR Part 91 or Part 135 regulations and fall under one or more of the following classifications:

Non-military flight training (commercial flight schools)

Corporate Flight Department operations (Business Aviation)

Operation of registered experimantal, heavy, medium, small, light, ultra-light and lighter-than-air aircraft (balloons)

Aircraft operated under FAR Part 135 fall into the General Aviation classification as they operate for hire, but are not required to meet the same requirements as aircraft operated by scheduled carriers under Part 121. Also, many aircraft operating under Part 135 do not do so exclusively, being operated by their owners both for private/business purposes in addition to air taxi work.

In many cases, the only physical difference between an aircraft operated under Part 91 and a similar type operated under Part 135 is the cabin appointments. Our family's Cessna 414 is a good example of this, as anyone who's been around the Cessna 300/400 types can tell that it was a former Part 135 aircraft at one time in its life. Two details of the interior appointments point that out immediately. First, the aircraft has a partition between the flight deck and the passenger cabin. Most Cessna 300/400 series airframes that were delivered to Part 91 operators do not have the partition. The second clue is the difference in upholstery of the seats on the flight deck and the passenger cabin seats. The flight deck seats are battleship grey fabric while the seats in the rear cabin (except the belted toilet) are navy blue leather. Add the presence of all the optional features such as fold out tables, cup holders, passenger display (airspeed, altitude and outside temperature) and the aircraft's Part 135 background is immediately noticable.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineUnited Airline From Hong Kong, joined Jan 2001, 9168 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5140 times:

Heard that its closely related to Regional Aviation right?

Coz at The University of New South Wales School of Aviation, Regional Aviation and General Aviation are two sister courses.


User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 5119 times:

I don't know if that division is the same here in the states (my BS and MS are in Criminal Justice, not aviation). GA is probably close to RA there in Australia/NSW but here (at least in the eyes of government) pretty much all forms of flying other than military or Part 121 flight operations is lumped under Part 91 and Part 135, both of which are considered General Aviation. Regional operations here usually refers to operations of regional scheduled airlines which operate under Part 121. However, a privately owned transport category aircraft (such as a 707, etc.) can operate under Part 91 as long as it is not used for hire.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
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