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25 Years Since Air NZ DC 10 Crash  
User currently offlineRyan h From Australia, joined Aug 2001, 1496 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 8630 times:

November 28 2004 marks 25 years since the Air New Zealand DC 10 crashed in Antarctica.

From what I have read the reasons for the crash are still not fully known.


South Australian Spotter
24 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12041 posts, RR: 47
Reply 1, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 8583 times:
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A sad day for NZ.

This is the plane:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Steve Brimley




Hey AA, the 1960s called. They want their planes back!
User currently offlineEGGD From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 12443 posts, RR: 36
Reply 2, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 8541 times:

I thought the aircrafts pilots got disorientated in low cloud during a sightseeing flight and hit the side of an (Antarctic) mountain? I don't think they were at a very high altitude either.

User currently offlineOV735 From Estonia, joined Jan 2004, 903 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 8511 times:

ASN (http://aviation-safety.net/database/1979/791128-0.htm) states that the plane hit Mt Erebus at less than 1500ft due to the crew getting lost.

User currently offlineJano From Slovakia, joined Jan 2004, 823 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 8494 times:

Macarthur Job
"Air Disaster" Volume 2

"I do not like this..." chapter
pp 61-82

Air New Zealand DC10-30 ZK-NZP



The Widget Air Line :)
User currently offlineTG992 From New Zealand, joined Jan 2001, 2910 posts, RR: 10
Reply 5, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 8428 times:

Cause of the crash is still disputed - the accident report found that the cause of the crash was the decision of the captain to descend below minimum regulated altitude. A later court enquiry found that the cause of the crash was the changing of flight coordinates without informing the flight crew.

When it comes down to the nitty gritty, it's a tragic case of chicken and egg. Flight plan didn't change, crash wouldn't have occurred; crew didn't descend below minimum, crash wouldn't have occurred.

It was a sombre day at Air New Zealand yesterday - made more so by the incredible, scarcely believeable fact that some of the wreckage has reappeared on Mt. Erebus after many years under the ice, with our company livery still clearly visible, and was spotted by the people attending the memorial service at Scott Base yesterday.

We will never forget.




-
User currently offlineAR385 From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 5946 posts, RR: 30
Reply 6, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 8408 times:
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TG992,

Excellent summary, but I would also add the tardiness of the GPWS. By the time the crew got its warning there was no way to avoid Mt. Erebus.



MGGS
User currently offlineTG992 From New Zealand, joined Jan 2001, 2910 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 8410 times:

TE901 Passengers and Crew

ADDIS Peter J
AISENMAN Lieone M
ALAN L
ALLAN Jane P
ALLAN Marjorie T
ANDERSON Audrey G
ANDERSON Margaret I
ANGLESEY Grant W
ARMITAGE Ethel M
ARNOLD Melinda M
ARNOLD Valerie E
ASHTON Grahame M
BAINBRIDGE Thomas E
BALDWIN Llewellyn A
BARNICK Kay M
BARNICK Marion R
BEAUMONT Earl
BECKETT Desmond W
BLAIR Patricia A
BOND Marilyn A
BOND Robin M
BREHAUT Ronald T
BROAD John P
BROAD Phillipa M
BROOKS Geraldine K
BROUGH Aubrey C
BUCHANAN Geoffrey
BURKHALTER Lucille C
BURGESS Lindsay R
BURGESS Rose E
BURGI Heinz
BURTON Lorraine E
BUTLER Rae Jeanne
CAMERON Rangiaho
CAMPBELL Stuart D
CARLETON John B
CARLETON Marion R
CARR Margaret B
CHADDERTON Brian H
CHADDERTON Valerie E
CHRISTIANSEN Alla
CHRISTMAS Hugh F
CLARK David
CLARK Irene A
CLARK Iris
CLARK William H
COCKRILL Joan A
COLBRAN Cyril B
COLBRAN Yvonne L
COLE John W
COPAS Jean A
COPLEY Susan E
COPSEY Audrey J
COREY Constance
CRABTREE Mary A
CRABTREE Norman D
DAHL Marie P
DAVIES June
DAWSON Peter M
DEAN Kay
DEBBAGE Florence D
DELMAGE Nora V
DUFF Helen D
DUKE Athol D
DYKZUEL Herman M
DYKZUEL Johannes
EAGLES Gwen L
EDWARDS Elizabeth J
EDWARDS Edna M
EMMETT Cecil C
EMMETT John B
FERRELL Jean
FROST Katherine E
FURUKAWA Kuniyasu
GALLAGHER Alfred J
GALLAGHER Elsie T
GIBBS Brucie
GILLIVER Richard
GOSLING Violet
GOTO Norio
GULLAND Pamela M
HANCE Florence L
HANSEN Marlene A
HARRIS Hazel P
HARRISON Annie
HARRISON Muriel F
HARTLEY James F
HARTY Myra P
HIGUCHI Mitsuo
HILL Eileen E
HILL Gordon A
HAWORTH Kathleen M
HAWORTH Peter
HOLLOWAY Jean M
HOLTHAM Bryan E
HOTSON Roy H
HOUGHTON John G
HOWARTH Ralph B
HUGHES Stephen W
HUMPHREY Mildred A
HYNDMAN Thomas W
IMAI Akira IMAI Hisako
JAHN Ernest A
JAHN Isabel
JARVIS Nicholas D
JENKINS Evelyn L
JENNINGS Charles I
KARL Kathleen F
KEARNEY Dennis F
KEITH John E
KENDON Nancy P
KERR Betty
KERR Francis R
KERR Geoffrey I
KILSBY Anthony J
KILSBY Geoffrey M
KING Nancy
KIRK Donald C
KITAGAWA Asako
KLASSOVITY Paul A
KLENSCH Carl R
LAKE Mary L
LARSEN William O
LAVIN James F
LEPINE Yves
LIES Michael R
LING Alison L
LOCHER Urs
LOMAX William B
LOUGHNAN Charles H
LOUGHNAN Patrick L
MacKENZIE John A
MacKENZIE Stella V
MADGWICK Eudora E
MAGNELL Theodore J
MAGNELL Muriel
MANLEY David Victor
MANN Dorothy M
MARSDEN Dorothy
MARSDEN Joseph Al
MARTIN Sarah J
MASKELYNE Trevor J
MASON Robert
MATHEWS Barbara D
MAYNARD Olive M
MAYNARD William G
McDONALD Shirley J
McKENDRY Richard J
McKENZIE Margaret J
McMILLAN John B
McMILLAN Melba P
McNAMARA Bernard J
McNEIL Eric A
MEIER Jurg
MITCHELL Mark G
MITSUHASHI Junichi
MITSUHASHI Nakako
MULGREW Peter D
MUNRO Ross
MURRAY Owen J
NICHOLSON Christine M
NODA Shigeru
O'CONNOR Ian J
ODANI Hiroko
ODANI Morihiko
OLIVER Mervyn J
ONO Tetsuro
OSAWA Juhei
OSAWA Masa
OZAWA Norio
PALMER David L
PALMER Edward J
PALMER Gary K
PARKAARI Eiji K
PATERSON Ethel M
PATERSON Linda J
PAYKEL Nola M
PAYNE Alfred M
PEACOCKE Marjorie E
PETHERS Carla
PLUMMER Alexander F
PLUMMER Hilda F
POTTER Michael A
PRESTON Robert J
PRICE Beatrice I
PRICE Beverley
PRIDMORE Joy A
RAWLINS Valerie
REVELL Basil H
REVELL Eileen G
RICHMOND Pamela G
ROBB Helen
ROBERTS Alison M
ROBERTS Michael S
ROBINSON Betty E
RUDEN Karl
SATO Hisako
SCOTT Marie T
SEKI Michi
SEKI Toshiro
SHEPHERD George M
SHIGETA Seishiro
SHIONOYA Ryoichi
SMITH Betty L
SMYTHE Henry H
STEEL Ralph A
STEVENSON Antony J
STEWART Donald M
STOKES Alan M
STOREY Phyllis M
TAKADA Masaaki
TANTON Peter A
TAYLOR Douglas C
THOMAS Roy P
THOMAS Walter D
THOMPSON Billie T
THOMPSON Henry F
THOMPSON Watson
TREMAINE Floss A
TREMAINE Robert D
TRINDER Elaine F
WARD Henry
WARD Valerie
WATSON Isobel
WATSON Katherine
WEBB Alfred W
WILLIAMS Janet C
WILLIAMS Janet M
WILLIAMS Leonard H
WOOD Barbara A
WOOD Irvine K
WORTH Linda
YANAGISAWA Hamako
YANAGISAWA Nobuyoshi
YOKOYAMA Ryoji
ZOLL Ottma

COLLINS, Thomas James Captain
CASSIN, Gregory Mark First Officer
LUCAS, Graham Neville First Officer
BROOKS, Gordon Barrett Flight Engineer
MOLONEY, Nicholas John Flight Engineer
BENNETT, David John Senior Flight Steward
CARR-SMITH, Elizabeth Mary Stewardess
CATER, Graham Ronald Flight Steward
COLLINS, Martin John Purser
FINLAY, Michael James Senior Flight Steward
KEENAN, Dianne Stewardess
LEWIS, James Charles Flight Steward
MARINOVIC, Suzanne Margaret Stewardess
MAXWELL, Bruce Rhodes Flight Steward
MORRISON, Katrina Mary Stewardess
McPHERSON, Roy William Chief Purser
SCOTT, Russell Morrison Purser
SICKLEMORE David Brian Flight Steward
SIMMONS, Stephen George Flight Steward
WOLFERT, Marie-Therese Stewardess



-
User currently offlineFoxecho From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 742 posts, RR: 17
Reply 8, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 8291 times:

Wasn't Engineer Brooks involved in the rescue of a lost aircraft over the Pacific a few months before?

Andrew
JFK/MEM/MCI



..uh, we'll need that to live......
User currently offlineZKSUJ From New Zealand, joined May 2004, 7073 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 8284 times:

I read in a book thet ZK-NCP was nicknemed 'the haunted P' as a mecahnic died while working on the aircraft before it was delivered to NZ. Hence some (very few but some) believe that the aircraft was cursed.

However, still a sad day in NZ. The story was all over the news on the TV. May the passengers and crew Rest in Peace.


User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 11853 posts, RR: 18
Reply 10, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 8194 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

In todays wellington paper it has a good picture of some of the remains that appeared. The biggest part that has appeared is the forward fuselage, which clearly shows the "a" of air. Also an engine and a cargo net has also appeared further up.

Here is the link that has the picture of the forward fuselage
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3111318a10,00.html

Another link with more info
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,0a12595,00.html

EDIT: more info

[Edited 2004-11-28 22:50:17]

User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 11853 posts, RR: 18
Reply 11, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 8182 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Sir Edmond Hillary was also scheduled to be the commentator on TE901 on the day, but was replaced by Sir Eds best friend and climbing and polar companion Peter Mulgrew.

User currently offlineClassicLover From Ireland, joined Mar 2004, 4602 posts, RR: 24
Reply 12, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 8114 times:

A very sad event indeed.

Interesting that the remains of the aircraft are reappearing after all this time...

Trent.



I do quite enjoy a spot of flying - more so when it's not in Economy!
User currently offlineNIKV69 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 8085 times:

R.I.P

Horrible crash, the picture on airdisaster.com of the mountain and the trail the DC-10 left was interesting. 79' was a bad year. The AA crash at ORD too, due to horrible maintenance practice was horrible as well.



User currently offlineJumboJim747 From Australia, joined Oct 2004, 2464 posts, RR: 45
Reply 14, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 7323 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

This topic is of great interest to me also that i started a thread without noticing that one has already been started.
Apologies for this mistake.
Because of the bond that we austalians have with new Zealand its still felt through our country as if it one of our own.



On a wing and a prayer
User currently offlineAerokiwi From New Zealand, joined Jul 2000, 2634 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 7200 times:

The dispicable behaviour of Air NZ management at the time and the meddling of the then Prime Minister, Robert Muldoon, only added to the shock. The attempt to cover-up the truth and blame the pilots hands down was, well, shocking.

Justice Mahon was another casualty of the whole affair. He worked to uncover the truth but was ultimately a broken man. So very sad, for all concerned. Amazing that Hillary was due to be on the flight.

My parents said that at the time, it seemed like everyone was connected to someone on the flight.


User currently offlinePlanespotting From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 3512 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 7165 times:

We studed this crash in depth in my CRM/Human Factors class my soph year in college. LIke most accidents, there were a few factors that contributed to this crash. The flight plan being changed, the NDB on antarctica giving errounous singles.....(or something along those lines, something about an NDB), of course the changed flight plan, and then there was the fact that visibility, despite being 60 miles, was basically 0.

It's a phenomon that happens in the north pole or the south pole. When it is an grey, overcast sky, put that white blanket on top of the vast sea of ice, and you get white light bouncing back and forth, creating a white-out situation. An F/O i know at southwest flew C-130's for the Navy in and out of Antarctica, and he described it as "feeling like you couldn't tell if you were a palms width from the surface or at 25,000 feet"

This condition creates an illusion, where the eye basically is focusing on nothing (if you're looking out the window) and it looks as if you are staring into oblivion. Had it been a non-overcast day, they would have most likely seen that giant white mountain in front of their DC-10. Unfortunately it was one of the many pinholes that had to fall into place to create this truly tragic accident.



Do you like movies about gladiators?
User currently offlineAv8trxx From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 657 posts, RR: 6
Reply 17, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 7129 times:

BARNICK Kay M
BARNICK Marion R

Marion Barnick (1919-1979) was travelling with her daughter Kay on this trip. Marion was a pilot who learned to fly in 1939 and held all ratings through ATP. She loved to fly, teach aspiring pilots and to help young women attain their aviation goals. I received a memorial flight scholarship for my Commercial in her name.


User currently offlineGasman From New Zealand, joined Mar 2004, 852 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 6971 times:

"From what I have read the reasons for the crash are still not fully known."

"I thought the aircrafts pilots got disorientated in low cloud."

".....the plane hit Mt Erebus at less than 1500ft due to the crew getting lost."


None of the above, in fact being correct.

The DC-10's inertial navigation system computer was re-programmed before the fatal flight to take the aircraft on a path directly over Mt. Erebus without the knowledge of the crew, who believed the track to take them directly up McMurdo sound, well away from high terrain. It had been the practice of Air New Zealand pilots to descend to 2000 feet in VFR on these flights to allow good sightseeing. (Whether this was done with the blessing of Civil Aviation - the regulatory authority - has been the subject of much conjecture.)

TE901 descended through a hole in a cloud layer to 1500 ft, and was VFR. Unfortunately because of the whiteout phenomenon, Mt. Erebus was invisible to them. What they "saw" was exactly what they expected to see had they been flying down McMurdo sound - a flat vista of white.

However unable to establish VHF radio contact with McMurdo at a point when he should have been able, Capt. Collins elected to climb away. Unfortunately just seconds too late to avoid a collision with the mountain.

The aftermath:
- Air New Zealand, in the hours following the crash, destroy crucial navigational evidence.
- The somewhat facile Air Accident Report places most of the blame for the accident on the flight crew as they "descended towards an area of poor surface definition"
- The Royal commission of Enquiry headed by Peter Mahon exonerates the crew and places culpability with airline operations and management.
- The Privy Council declare Mahon had outstepped his jurisdiction in making his judgement on airline management (they did not, however, say he was wrong!)

And like after all these tragedies, controversy still remains.

May they rest in peace. I can still remember that awful evening in 1979 when the television gave us the news.....


User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4537 posts, RR: 42
Reply 19, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 6966 times:

I made this post on the anniversary last year, so I will repost it again now:

On the 28th of November 1979, Air New Zealand's DC-10 ZK-NZP, carrying 257 passengers and crew, departed on TE901, a sightseeing flight to the Antarctic. 24 years ago from the time I am posting this, the aircraft was over the Antarctic ice, and less than half an hour away from tragedy, when it crashed into Mt Erebus shortly before 1pm NZDT. It was not until that evening that it became apparent that something had gone terribly wrong, as the aircraft failed to make contact with anyone, and as the time that the fuel would have been exhausted passed, it was acknowledged by CEO Morrie Davis that the aircraft had indeed crashed.

To this day, controversy remains over the exact cause of the accident, and who was to blame. Pilot error was the cause determined by an accident investigation, however a Royal Commission of Inquiry under Justice Peter Mahon apportioned blame squarly with the airline and its practices. The Mahon Report was later overruled by the Privvy Council, not on the merit of what had been found, but because the Commission went beyond its terms of reference. It is unlikely there will ever be any reconciling of the two different theories over the accident.

However, this post is not about beating out the same old arguments, but rather pausing and thinking of those who lost their lives in what was at the time the 4th worst air accident in history, and the second major one of 1979 involving the DC-10. To this date it remains the worst transportation accident in terms of loss of life in New Zealand's history (and only one fatality less than the 1931 Napier Earthquake, New Zealand's worst tragedy), with the almost everyone in the country of around 3 million people at the time having some connection to someone among the 237 passengers and 20 crew. The accident left a terrible scar on New Zealand's national consciousness, one that remains today and will still take some time to heal.

The nationality breakdown of those on board were:

200 New Zealanders
24 Japanese
22 Americans
6 British
2 Canadians
1 Australian
1 French
1 Swiss

We will remember them.


The full thread can be read here.

In addition to the news links given by 777ER, here are some from the New Zealand Herald:

Air NZ explains Erebus absence (30/11/04)
TE901 debris reappears on icy slopes of Erebus (29/11/04)
Thousands attend Erebus anniversary (29/11/04)
Daughter gets her chance to say goodbye (29/11/04)
Anderton wants Government to vindicate pilots (29/11/04)
Bells will toll for 257 dead (27/11/04)
Editorial: It helps that we learned from Erebus (27/11/04)
John Roughan: Lessons for today in Erebus probe (27/11/04)
Disaster pilot's trust honours Air NZ (25/11/04)

A book which I would recommend on the subject is Impact Erebus by Gordon Vette (a former senior Captain at Air New Zealand, and colleague of the crew of TE901). It makes very interesting reading, although it is biased towards the point of view of the Mahon Report, which placed the blame on the airline and not Captain Collins. The book as available at Amazon.com.

Although the issue remains controversial to this day, one thing which can be said with some certainty is that it has left an indelible impact on the national consciousness and pride of New Zealand. As another anniversary comes and goes, the memories grow older and the event recedes into history. However, for those alive at the time, those familiar with the accident, and especially those who lost friends and loved-ones on that terrible day, it is something that will always be remembered.

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offlineSpacecadet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 3523 posts, RR: 12
Reply 20, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 6956 times:

Excellent summary, but I would also add the tardiness of the GPWS. By the time the crew got its warning there was no way to avoid Mt. Erebus.

GPWS systems did not have predictive obstacle warnings in those days... if you were flying straight and level, the GPWS doesn't know there's a mountain in the way of your flight path until it rises up to meet you.

Many airplanes are still using the older style GPWS systems, but many others have a newer type that uses GPS data to predict terrain obstacles in your flight path.



I'm tired of being a wanna-be league bowler. I wanna be a league bowler!
User currently offlineKiwiflyer From New Zealand, joined Nov 2004, 1 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 6837 times:

Just felt I had to share my experience of this sad time for New Zealand.

Back in 1979 I was 10 years old, but even now I remember that time in my life vividly.

I have always been a huge Air New Zealand fan, never more so than in 1979. Late in 1978 I had the extreme privilege of flying to London with my Mum on Air New Zealand. I can still recall much detail about the flights and even remember pretty much where we were seated. (I even remember I had an omelet for breakfast served on brown crockery.) I adored Air New Zealand's beautiful DC10 and this trip was a dream come true for me.

I was also a member Air New Zealand's Junior Jet Club, and for each leg of the journey had my log book updated and signed by the crew, which I still have today (along with my badge). I even had the privilege of visiting the cockpit on one leg of the trip. I also remember how I thought it was odd that although we were still in an Air New Zealand DC10 we had a British Airways crew on the leg of the journey from Los Angeles to Heathrow.

For my 10th birthday I got a model of Air New Zealand's DC10 which I still treasure today. At night, in bed as a boy, I would turn the lights out and shine my torch to illuminate the tail fin, as I pretended to fly it to distant shores.

The first I remember hearing that something was amiss on that November day was a news flash in the evening saying that the aircraft was overdue. The weird thing thinking about events that night was I never dreamt for one moment the aircraft would not return safely. Even when a newsreader came on later that evening and reported that the aircraft would have run out of fuel did I ever dream that it would not be safe somehow.

I remember a very restless sleep that night and waking early to go through to Mum and Dad's room. I remember hoping that the first radio news would report that the aircraft was safe, however within the next few hours, on a beautiful Wellington morning, I would learn that the aircraft would not be coming home, and this 10 year old boy's heart broke. Truly broke.

For the next few days I remember trying to work out what I was doing exactly at the time of the crash. I felt guilty that perhaps I had been playing at school at the moment all those souls left our shores, and that maybe I could have helped them in some way.

...


I will always have my memories of my journey in an Air New Zealand's DC10, and the huge sense of loss I felt that changed one little boy's life, as well as our small nation.

The souls on board the aircraft that day may have left our shores, however I feel more strongly than ever that they returned home again to fill our hearts with warmth, peace and love.

May we never forget them.











User currently offlineTrolley Dolley From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 6698 times:

One of my whanau (family) lie unclaimed on that Antarctic mountainside. I've given myself a few days to write on this post. It was absolutely horrible to see the wreckage- a substaintial piece quite clearly belonging to Air NZ- re-emerge from the glacier. It looked too new, like the accident had happened yesterday.

In this case, I honestly feel that its not the dead we should be grieving. They died instantly. They died happy, right up until the time of parting. They were surrounded by champange, laughter and a feeling of shared joy. They were delighting in a wonderful and special day for them. Death came instantly and without warning.

The pain was for those left behind. The accromony, the arguments, the blaming. For those non-New Zealanders, the effect on this small country would be equivalent to an aircrash in the USA, today, killing 23,000. It's made a deep and lasting scar on the country. Thankfully the lessons have been learned.

To me the anniversary is not just about the dead, but about remembering the efforts made by the great team of men who risked their own lives to try and bring everyone back from the dangerous mountainside. It also about the police who put the pieces of a grizly a many thousand-piece jigsaw together to reunite the families that were torn apart. I salute them and thank them.



User currently offlineVirginFlyer From New Zealand, joined Sep 2000, 4537 posts, RR: 42
Reply 23, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6540 times:

For those who are interested, TVNZ's current affairs show Close Up at 7 ran a special episode about the Erebus disaster on the 22nd of November. It can be found here.

V/F



"So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth." - Bahá'u'lláh
User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 11853 posts, RR: 18
Reply 24, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6518 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

VirginFlyer
I taped the special episode of close up at 7. I strongly recommend it to anyone, who can watch it via the link you provided.


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