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Fare Went Down After Purchase  
User currently offlineETStar From Canada, joined Jan 2004, 2103 posts, RR: 7
Posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3231 times:

Ok, I purchased this transborder ticket on Air Canada last week, and I now realised that the fare has gone down by about $50. Can I call AC and ask for a refund for the difference in price? Does the fare decrease have to be for the exact same flights I booked? Do you know of any restrictions? (I am having to spare myself holding on the phone, or even reading their contract of carriage).

Thx

16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 12341 posts, RR: 18
Reply 1, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3192 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

AC would most likly not as you purchased the fare before the fare drop.

User currently offlineGlobeTrekker From Netherlands, joined Dec 2003, 851 posts, RR: 15
Reply 2, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3187 times:

Not likely. If the opposite happened and you already purchased the ticket they wouldn't tell you to pay more.........

GlobeTrekker



The World Is A Book And Those Who Do Not Travel Read Only A Page
User currently offlineN506CR From Costa Rica, joined Nov 2004, 147 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 3182 times:

well, if Air Canada doesn't call you to pay them extra when you got a cheap fare and it actually raised, then I don't think they'll call you to refund the difference for the high fare you paid that actually lowered.

*the 'call you' term used only for reference*


User currently offlineThe777Man From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 6676 posts, RR: 55
Reply 4, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3167 times:

If the fare has gone down for the exact same flights you are booked on and it's available, AC will refund you the money as per Canadian law. Other carriers are required to do the same if point of sale is Canada with a Canadian form of payment. You will need to call them to look into this and to get your refund, if applicable.

The777Man



Need a Boeing 777 Firing Order....Further to fly....CI, MU, LX and LH 777s
User currently offlineLeskova From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 6075 posts, RR: 70
Reply 5, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3139 times:

The777Man, are you serious? Canada has a law like that???

Wow, as an airline, I'd be pushing to get something as dumb as that repealed as soon as possible!

When you buy a ticket, you agree to the price - as others have mentioned, you're not required to pay extra if the price goes up, so I'd say it is absolutely unfair to the airlines if they actually have to give a refund if the price goes down!

At least that would explain to me why some Canadian members on here continuously complain about fares in Canada being so high (on non-LCCs): as an airline, I'd avoid lowering prices at any cost with a law like that as well... it's bad enough having to accept the lower income for future sales, but to have to actually return money already collected from previous sales?

Regards,
Frank



Smile - it confuses people!
User currently offlineETStar From Canada, joined Jan 2004, 2103 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3125 times:

Kewl, one more reason to like Canada...

I guess here's the thing: If you buy an item, and realize that the price went down say 5 days later (ok, a lawn mower) and you have not used the item yet (in resaleable condition). You CAN return it and get a full refund (provided that the condition of sale did not state otherwise as in clearances etc) and you could re-purchase the item at the lower rate (if not at the same location, then at another). I guess that's exactly how I am going to treat it, minus the refund.

In the case of my booking, the fare change occured on a different set of flights, but I will keep watching the darn fare and call AC if my flight's are changed.


User currently offlineYVR2SAN From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 62 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3088 times:

Even in the US if the fare goes down on the same exact flight, same class of service as your ticket most will and I have done this refund the difference if the fare went down.

User currently offlineETStar From Canada, joined Jan 2004, 2103 posts, RR: 7
Reply 8, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 3087 times:

How do you get the refund? In form of a voucher or credited to your Visa/MC?

User currently offlineNeilalp From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 1034 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2962 times:

4 Years ago on a trip to Hawaii on NW I paid $600 or so and then during a fare sale I check and the price had dropped to $450 so I called up NW, I had to pay the $75 re-book fee, but it was still worth it as I still had a refund of $75 coming to me. So after all was said and done my fare was $525 instead of the posted $450 b/c of the re-book charge. But i still gladly took the $75 vocher.

User currently offlineFoxBravo From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 3008 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2918 times:

Yes, most U.S. airlines will refund the difference in the form of a voucher for future travel, minus any change fees (typically in the ballpark of $25-50, depending on the airline and fare). I have done this successfully on both NW and AA in recent memory.

Basically, they cancel your existing flights, issue a refund, and then rebook you at the lower fare (although it can be done all at once, so it's easier than that sounds). So, as long as your original fare is changeable (even for a fee), I don't really see how they can stop you.

It's only if your original fare is completely nonrefundable and non-changeable that you might run into problems. Even then, however, the airline might still do it as a gesture of goodwill. If they didn't do this, given the frequency with which fares go up and down, people would have no incentive to book far in advance, which is something the airlines generally encourage.



Common sense is not so common. -Voltaire
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20822 posts, RR: 62
Reply 11, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 2876 times:

How do you get the refund? In form of a voucher or credited to your Visa/MC?

Not very long ago UA simply credited $20 back to my credit card twice, once for each set of identical tickets I'd bought for flights a weekend apart, that I noticed had gone down in price a few days after purchase. There was no cancelling of my reservations or reissue of my ticket necessary. A simple phone call to UA's reservations to point out the fare difference took care of it, and they faxed me new confirmations with the revised fare.

It's always been my experience that if the fare goes down for the same fare class in which you're currently ticketed, and 1) you still meet the advance purchase requirements for the fare, and 2) inventory in your ticketed fare class is available, then you qualify for a refund by way of the original form of payment. The one time I requested a fare revision on a ticket I'd paid for in cash, the agent asked if I wanted a company check mailed to me, or just pick-up the cash at check-in. Choosing the latter option, I was indeed handed cash when I checked in for my flight.

Thanks for bringing this topic up--it reminded me it's time to call around to the airlines I fly and ask what their current policy is on this, as I've not requested a credit since some have begun charging to speak with a live reservations agent.

Cheers.



International Homo of Mystery
User currently offlineThe777Man From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 6676 posts, RR: 55
Reply 12, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 2829 times:

Leskova, Yes, that's the law in Canada. As has been explained by others in the thread, in the US, if the fares goes down and and it's available for the same flights as ticketed, most airlines will give a voucher for the difference OR for a service charge (now USD 100) issue a difference back to the original form of payment. I'm not sure if this is law in the US or if this is voluntary.

Since US reservation centers for US carriers also handles calls from Canada, there's info on how to handle the situation if point of sale is Canada. Key to get the refund is that the customer has to check back to the airline to see if the fare has gone down.

The777Man



Need a Boeing 777 Firing Order....Further to fly....CI, MU, LX and LH 777s
User currently offlineManu From Canada, joined Dec 2004, 406 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2769 times:

Dammit! I wish I knew this before. I'm flying AC to Victoria in a few weeks and the fare dropped by 50 bucks. But I do have conditions on my ticket, which I think one is $50 fee for changes. So that means they'd charge me $50, it'd be a wash?

User currently offlineYVRtoYYZ From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 671 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2751 times:

I recently booked a WS flight and had the fare drop $35 within 6 hrs of booking; simply called WS and they credited me the difference right then and there. Don't know if AC is that simple, but worth a whirl. After all, the worse that can happen is that you have to pay the fare that you've paid already.

-YVRtoYYZ


User currently offlineFoxBravo From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 3008 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2718 times:

After all, the worse that can happen is that you have to pay the fare that you've paid already.

Exactly. I think the lesson to take away from this whole thread is that, although policies and laws vary depending on the circumstances, if your fare goes down after purchase, it NEVER hurts to call the airline and at least try to get something out of it!



Common sense is not so common. -Voltaire
User currently offlineDaumueller From Germany, joined Nov 2003, 693 posts, RR: 6
Reply 16, posted (10 years 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2692 times:

ok, so I'll apply as a yield manager for AC - if they need to refund any fare differences, this should be a very quiet job  Smile

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