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First 747, First A380. What Is Different/the Same?  
User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1116 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 4194 times:

So the A380 is becoming the largest commercial airliner in the world. Last time it happened was 35 years ago. What is similar/different in the two events?

For instance, I have always heard that the 747 was first built in a very short time with a lot of pressure and tension. Almost in a hurry. In comparison the building of the A380 has seemed to be uneventful (over budget and maybe some delay but nothing to write home about). Do you think that is true or is a matter of perception?

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineWhitehatter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4183 times:

The 747 was built in a relative rush, in response to two different requirements. The first was for a USAF heavy freighter (the C-5 won that order) and then for the airlines such as Pan Am. Juan Trippe was breathing heavily down the neck of Boeing for the plane.

Boeing had much difficulty with the 747 at first, caused by being considerably overweight and over budget. Pratt and Whitney also had serious problems with their new JT9D high bypass engine.

The airframe weight issues were effectively tackled by Boeing, although the JT9D took longer to get up to a reasonable standard of reliability. It went on to become one of the most rugged and widely used engines ever (747, DC-10 srs 40, A300/310, 767 and was also offered for the TriStar)

The A380 should have a smoother introduction as engine technology is now much more mature, and the overweight issue with that aircraft is considerably less than that given for the 747 prototype.


User currently offlineAlitalia744 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 4753 posts, RR: 45
Reply 2, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4147 times:

Same: Biggest aircraft at their respective times.

Difference: The entire world was watching the 747. Europe and Aviation Enthusiasts are watching the A380.



Some see lines, others see between the lines.
User currently offlineGreaser From Bahamas, joined Jan 2004, 1101 posts, RR: 4
Reply 3, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4129 times:

Same: Biggest aircraft at their respective times.

Difference: The entire world was watching the 747. Europe and Aviation Enthusiasts are watching the A380.


I think there's some interest outside the aviation community for the A380, but it won't change the face of commerical aviation like the 747 did. I also believe the A380 is NOT the biggest aircraft at "its respective time". The Antonov 225 is still bigger, and the Lockheed Martin C-5 is longer than the A380.



Now you're really flying
User currently offlineFriendlySkies From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 4110 posts, RR: 5
Reply 4, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4121 times:

Well, most people who aren't like us (i.e., don't really care one way or the other about airplanes) won't see such a big deal. They'll say "Oh, that's been done before" because of the 747. Yes, the 747 doesn't have two full decks, but lets face it, the average pax won't really care. Especially now. When the 747 was first put into service, it was a flying luxury liner...the A380 will just be another airliner TO THE AVERAGE PAX. This is because today, nobody cares about what airplane they're on as long as they get a cheap fare. Heck, most don't even care about the service until their flight is delayed or their bag is lost. And I can guarantee you that many average pax will still call it a 747, just like they call A320s and 757s 747s...

User currently offlineA380900 From France, joined Dec 2003, 1116 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4097 times:

I expect a huge media coverage for the A380. Especially with the present geopolitical tensions between the US and Europe. Pundits are going to zero in on the plane and pontificate on Europe and the US.

I would expect it to be on the cover of most daily in the US and Europe on January 18th, make most of the TV news everywhere in the world.

There's no way the A380 takes to the sky without anyone noticing outside Europe as some suggest here.


User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 984 posts, RR: 51
Reply 6, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 4091 times:

And I can guarantee you that many average pax will still call it a 747, just like they call A320s and 757s 747s...

I'll believe it. I was on an NW A319 flight with a college who looked at the safety card and remarked- "this can't be an Airbus, it doesn't seat 8-across.."

Frequent travelers and enthusiast will know it's an A380, but I doubt it will become a house-hold name.

Pratt and Whitney also had serious problems with their new JT9D high bypass engine.

Wow... PW having trouble with an engine. Somethings never change  Big grin

There's no way the A380 takes to the sky without anyone noticing outside Europe as some suggest here.

There is a big difference between anyone and everyone... the A388 will be quite a spectacle when it flies. It just won't have the house-hold name that the 747 has built over the last 30+ years....

[Edited 2005-01-09 04:49:10]

User currently offlineRayChuang From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 8018 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4047 times:

Pratt and Whitney also had serious problems with their new JT9D high bypass engine.

It took a long time for Pratt & Whitney to resolve the issues with the JT9D engine, mostly due to problems with the front fan. It wasn't until the JT9D-7 series arrived around 1973 that they finally licked the front fan problems, but by that time Boeing was already doing qualification tests with the General Electric CF6-50 series and Rolls-Royce RB.211-524 series engines.


User currently offlineBN747 From United States of America, joined Mar 2002, 5618 posts, RR: 51
Reply 8, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4015 times:

Excellent thread....

I don't think the A380 will win over air carriers will trample over themselves to get one of these into their fleets like they did when the 747 came on the scene.

When the 747 emerged it had far more committed cxrs than the A380... and after Pan Am stole the 'airline show' with it's 1st aircraft.. every jumped into the fray. Every US carrier of the day got their paws on one -- one way or another.. American, Braniff, Continental, Delta,Eastern,Northwest, Pan Am, Seaboard, TWA,World and United operated them at one time or another. Carriers from every continent got in on the action even though they could not afford it... Air Zaire, Avianca, Viasa, Varig, Aer Lingus, Lan Chile.. the list goes on and on...

... this is not going happen with the A380. Not because of it's appearance, but it's sticker price (although a better appearance or more attractive aircraft would certainly not hurt it's attraction to potential customers) but also because it's just too much airplane for most carriers and they already know it. The carriers don't need to 'try it out' ... but make no mistake... they will all be watching it very closely. The A380 will be lucky to crack the 200 sales moniker. Stellar performance of this aircraft could give it a much needed boost, but if it falls short just a bit short... it could prove Airbus' biggest blunder.


BN747



"Home of the Brave, made by the Slaves..Land of the Free, if you look like me.." T. Jefferson
User currently offlineTW741 From Liechtenstein, joined Sep 2004, 478 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3955 times:

I don't think that the A380 will have that much (media) attention for such a long time as the 747 had. Times have changed in 35 years. Going back to the 70s it was a real event to see the "jumbo" rolling out and flying. At airports people where really keen to watch the gigantic aircraft - dont forget that at this time people had visitors areas - most airports had no docking facilities - so people where actually "in touch" with the planes. Nowadays you can hardly see which airplane you are entering.

And - not to forget - todays media attention is short living - always on the run for more sensational news.
Think of flying into space - with Apollo rockets half of the world was sitting in front of the TV sets watching the launch of the rockets.
Lately with ISS and the shuttle flights it was usually just a short message that "another shuttle flight left Cape Canaveral for ISS" and the launch of the Russian space flights to ISS are not even broadcasted when they send up another rocket with water, oxygen or food to ISS.

Same will happen to the A380 - it will get routine pretty soon and - as mentioned above - people won't even realise that they sit in the A380 since the majority is interested to get as quick and convenient at the lowest fare possible from A to B.

In respect of aviation there is a huge difference between roughly 15.000 a.netters and the rest of the world ... Big grin

=TW741=



TWA - we showed you how good we have been!
User currently offlineSolnabo From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 854 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3938 times:


In this day and age everything is digital, not the case in 1969 so theres gonna be PR-interest when big Bertha takes her "first step", and the news apparatus will broadcast it in a blink of an eye (those who are intrested)

That what I think  Wink/being sarcastic

Micke



Airbus SAS - Love them both
User currently offlineNumberTwelve From Germany, joined Dec 2004, 1431 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (9 years 9 months 2 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3937 times:

I guess the rollout of the 380 will be a big media event in Europe, not that much in the US.
But no doubt: the roll out and maiden flight will be filmed and these movies will be part of airliners history.

When the 747 first flew, we were sitting in front of the tv to see this event - but there was no jealousy as it is now. Ok, there were no European competitor but a person who loves planes, will enjoy the view.

No word about the Boeing Guppy by the way, and when we compare this one with the 380, we see what a real ugly duck is.



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