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Ryanair 'slave Drivers'?  
User currently offlineHorus From Egypt, joined Feb 2004, 5230 posts, RR: 59
Posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 2385 times:

Article from today's Metro newspaper (11/1/05) p.9:

Ryanair 'slave drivers'

Working conditions at Ryanair are so bad that emplyees 'paint a picture of sheer misery' according to a report. 'People dare not speak out about bullying and overworking in case they lose their jobs,' said David Cockcroft of the International Transport Workers' Federation, which set up a website to deal with complaints. Cabin crew claimed they worked 12 hour shifts with no break. 'Prisoners are treated better,' said one. Ryanair's Eddie Wilson said: 'The ITF wesite is an irrelevance to Ryan air and our highly paid workers.'


Interesting...

Horus



[Edited 2005-01-11 20:09:21]


EGYPT: A 7,000 Year Old Civilisation
16 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSolnabo From Sweden, joined Jan 2008, 857 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2310 times:

Very interesting!!

Read today at flygtorget.se that Ezy are selling more tickets than Ryan in 2004.

Great news!  Laugh out loud

Micke



Airbus SAS - Love them both
User currently offlineUdo From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2287 times:

One more reason to avoid Ryan...and great to hear EZY beat RYN in ticket sales.


Regards
Udo


User currently offlineNumberTwelve From Germany, joined Dec 2004, 1431 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2280 times:

When people fear unemployment or want to get a job in a branche that is very popular, they even don't hesitate to work for FR.
People working for an airline that saves money in removing sun protection from windows, can't earn lots of money - and get treated like slaves.
Long live capitalism.



signature censored by admin - so check my profile
User currently offlineSabena332 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2256 times:

Air Berlin is not better, the payment is ridiculous and the working conditions are bad. I was invited for an interview at Air Berlin and nowadays I am glad that I didn't take the job. As I wrote in another thread, I would prefer to earn my money while sitting all day long with a hat in front of me in a pedestrian area than working for these companies.

Patrick


User currently offlineRunway31 From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2004, 72 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2197 times:

If Easy sold more tickets than Ryan during 2004, why did they not have more passengers?. Funny that.

User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19245 posts, RR: 52
Reply 6, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2125 times:

And U2 is far less profitable than FR.

What we have to ask ourselves is this: if an employee is expected to give 100%, why should he or she be paid any more than someone who is giving 75% effort? In my opinion, all employees should be expected - and should - give total effort regardless of pay. In addition, great effort resulting in high performance, at least as high as possible for the role performed, should not necessary be rewarded by increased pay but rather promotional opportunities. This could be what FR concentrates on, as first officers can become captains within 3 years and it's often possible to shift from being cabin crew members or managers to pilots, and so forth. So once promoted, you'd earn more money, would probably be more satisfied personally, would have a better reference if you left, and so forth. So you'd essentially be rewarded by a better job and a better reputation.

What's more, it's funny that these people almost certainly know that they'll be expected to work very hard, yet still apply.

[Edited 2005-01-11 22:20:26]


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineRJ100 From Switzerland, joined Nov 2000, 4121 posts, RR: 29
Reply 7, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2111 times:

I am sure that the Irish law has some regulations about working conditions. And if FR is not breaking the law then it's ok for me.

RJ100



none
User currently offlineChiguire From Venezuela, joined Sep 2004, 2005 posts, RR: 16
Reply 8, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2078 times:

Working conditions at Ryanair might not be the best. But even legacy carriers try to "learn" from them. Nobody is forced to work at Ryanair.
It is always better to have a job then to be unemployed ! The "slave drivers" is a typical unions way to see things...


User currently offlineHorus From Egypt, joined Feb 2004, 5230 posts, RR: 59
Reply 9, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2050 times:

I've only flown FR once and that was 3 years ago and from what I remember they were a pretty good airline. I'm flying them next month (STN-CIA-STN) so I'm hoping to get a more up-to-date opinion on them. Quite a few of my friends regularly fly them and they have no complaints.

The only reason I tend to go for U2 is simply because they fly to more 'real' airports compared to FR. For example if I wanted to go to Paris, U2 fly to Paris/Orly while FR go 'Paris'/Beauvais or if I wanted to go to Copenhagen, U2 go to Kastrup while FR go to Malmo, etc

Horus




EGYPT: A 7,000 Year Old Civilisation
User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19245 posts, RR: 52
Reply 10, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2031 times:

You will find, Mr H, that of the 95 airports served by FR, only 22 can be classed as being secondary.

In terms of your BVA and ORY example, there was a show a few years ago during which 3 passengers flew from a UK airport to BVA - one on BA, one on AF and one on FR - to see which person arrived at a very well-known location in Paris by public transport. Guess who got there first? The person who flew into BVA on FR.

"Quite a few of my friends regularly fly them and they have no complaints."

The same can probably be said for 99% of its passengers. The people who base the airline on here most probably have not flown the carrier so cannot accurately and fairly comment.



"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineHorus From Egypt, joined Feb 2004, 5230 posts, RR: 59
Reply 11, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1999 times:

Hey Pe@rson, believe I'm not trying to bash FR cos I think they've done well for themselves and I don't take 90% of criticism I hear against them seriously. However I just expressed my opinion (and that shared by many others) regarding FR's way out of city airport destinations.

Anyway like I said I'm flying STN-CIA-STN next month. Now I had the choice to go with U2 who fly LGW-CIA-LGW but I felt FR were better on this service in terms of price, flight timings and its easier for me to reach STN than LGW. What I'm trying to say is that all airlines have pros and cons.

Viv Le Ryanair!  Big thumbs up

Horus




EGYPT: A 7,000 Year Old Civilisation
User currently offlineTBCITDG From Australia, joined Jan 2004, 921 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1996 times:

Not everything is about union's, or a lack of commitment to your job.
When fatigue sets in, some people are more likely to 'overlook' certain things be it service or safety related duties.
After a 12 hour shift, either on the ground or in the air, a person will more than likely not have the same attention to detail that he/she possessed at the beginning of the day. Especially if they have had no decent break. In most countries around the world a 'break' is an essential component to any ones working day, it is not a luxury. After all when one signs on the dotted line at Ryanair, they are not signing on to work in a sweat shop.


User currently offlineChiguire From Venezuela, joined Sep 2004, 2005 posts, RR: 16
Reply 13, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 1982 times:

After a 12 hour shift, either on the ground or in the air, a person will more than likely not have the same attention to detail that he/she possessed at the beginning of the day.
Sure, I agree completely. But I am also sure that this is not a normal situation at Ryanair. I am sure this is even against Irish regulations. I not, it´s agains European.
If a 12 hour shift happens, it´s because of any problems/emergencies/exceptions.


User currently offlineMax Q From United States of America, joined May 2001, 4751 posts, RR: 18
Reply 14, posted (9 years 10 months 3 weeks ago) and read 1799 times:

How do you shift from being a 'cabin crewmember to a pilot?'


The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.
User currently offlineFoxiboy From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 208 posts, RR: 4
Reply 15, posted (9 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1710 times:

CHIGUIRE :- Yes 12 hour shifts are quite normal for many airlines in europe, and yes FR do have shifts that are longer when the crew are expected to do 6 sector days, and on some long sectors E.G some charter airlines operate to the red sea resorts in egypt with the OB sector being 5 hours and the IB up to six hours add on to this report time ,turnround, and post flight and this can add up to 15 hours min.
I have friends who used to work for FR both cabin crew and pilots who could not wait to get out, for various reasons,but the have all said that a company should not expect potetial employees to pay for training medicals uniforms etc,and i have to agree its not as if they are gonna take thos skills to another company as each airline has its own proceedures and rules and they will have to be trained by thier new airline as for uniforms well the crew are the front line staff dealing with the public so why should they have to pay for advertising the company, so yes to some extent they are slave drivers, and when they decide on a new uniform who will be expected to pay for it? no not the airline the staff.


User currently offlineGKirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24961 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (9 years 10 months 2 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 1588 times:

Apparently Ryanair employee's get paid more than their counterparts at the likes of EZY,WW,LS etc.


When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
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