Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Soviet-era Aeroflot Loads?  
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6482 posts, RR: 3
Posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2580 times:

We all know that, until 1991, Aeroflot was the world's largest airline. How many pax did it carry during some of those years (in whatever manner can be best gauged.) How easy was it for a Soviet citizen to travel? Was it mostly just party members, or ... ?


When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' T.Roosevelt
9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAfay1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1293 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 2451 times:

Well, I have no idea about loads, but when in history are you talking about? 1930, 1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990? It makes a difference in terms of government restrictions, air infrastructure, etc. Since every plane in civilian use was "Aeroflot" are you talking about village to village on AN-2, Moscow-Tblisi longhaul on IL-62, Moscow-Warsaw Pact, Moscow-Western Europe, etc.? Hehe, be more specific!

User currently offlineRIX From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1785 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2213 times:

In short (during mid-70's to early 90's):

more than 100,000,000 passengers a year (official data);

most of the flights were packed full, but sometimes quite empty;

it was very easy for a Soviet citizen to travel domestically, the tickets were not too expensive, sometimes very cheap - the problem was rather to get them staying in 4+ hours line (personal experience; I'm sure, 4+ hours was by far not a limit). No party membership required...

It was a totally different story to travel abroad. Even to "friendly socialist" country. Enough to say, there were two kinds of passport: one ("internal" - sounds funny, passport by definition is a travel document) actually an ID (with domicile registration, family members listed, nationality - no, not citizenship but ethnic origin, not even religion, ...), and another one ("foreign") for traveling abroad. You couldn't just go and order it - you had to produce documents proving you were going to travel. Then, up to early 90's, in addition to entry visa to a foreign country, you had to get "outgoing" visa to be able to leave your country - just having passport was not enough, you had to get a permission to leave the USSR every time you traveled abroad (however, there were multiple "outgoing" visas too)! There were almost no "private trips", it was either a business trip or "organized tourism". To get to both groups party membership was a great advantage. As for loads, I was lucky to travel abroad like a dozen times during 1989-1992 (when it started to be way easier, especially in Latvia), the aircraft were usually full (however, on some flights there were less than 10 people in Tu134, or about 30 people in Il86), but this was already a different era...




User currently offlineUshermittwoch From Germany, joined Jan 2004, 2963 posts, RR: 16
Reply 3, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2129 times:

"Moscow-Tblisi longhaul on IL-62", well I wouldn't call a 1000 mile flight a longhaul.
 Big grin



Where have all the tri-jets gone...
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6482 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 2121 times:

Ushermittwoch:

It was for an Il-62.  Big grin



When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' T.Roosevelt
User currently offlineRIX From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1785 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2073 times:

"It was for an Il-62" - most of the flights on this route were on Tu154.

User currently offlineWidebody From Ireland, joined Aug 2000, 1152 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 2045 times:

I travelled with them last week and their fleet was less than 100 aircraft according to their magazine, how many aircraft did they have on the go at their peak?

User currently offlineAfay1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1293 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 1922 times:

Incidentally it is still a requirement for most foreigners traveling in Russia to have a visa that allows them to LEAVE. If you lose it, you will not be allowed to exit the country without a huge hassle and sometimes the intervention of your embassy. The backlog for a person to get an international passport is still about a year. Some CIS countries do not issue passports until age 16, neccesitating travel with parents. Russian passports at least still can carry ethnic origin. It is not a requirement, but older passports have it. Again the question is difficult to answer due to not specificity. Sorry to be anal....

User currently offlineAeroflot777 From Russia, joined Mar 2004, 2993 posts, RR: 27
Reply 8, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 5 days ago) and read 1769 times:

It is not a requirement to have a visa allowing you to leave the country. All you need is your ticket and passport, and the Russian visa. That is all. Check-in will consist of checking your passport and ticket, and the passport control will consist of checking you visa and ending it upon your leaving the country. If you are a minor than you do need a document signed by both parents allowing you to leave the country by yourself.

User currently offlineAfay1 From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1293 posts, RR: 3
Reply 9, posted (9 years 2 months 3 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 1649 times:

Hmmm, you do in fact need a visa to leave the country. One's Russian visa is usually combined into one for both and people are not aware it is actually an entry/exit document. Some nationalities and some types of visas are seperate pieces of paper. They take the entry visa on entry and you need the seperate piece to exit. As a leader of foreign tourists in and out of Russia, I know the consequences of losing this exit piece of paper. You are denied exit. If you have a combined one, this is not a problem. Anyway, the seperate exit visas are usually green in color rather than blue or stuck directly in the passport. This of course has little to do with aviation....

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Airline Review: Aeroflot (Soviet Era) posted Thu Nov 16 2006 16:10:35 by AirAmericaC46
CDG-NRT In The Soviet Era posted Sun Feb 13 2005 13:50:43 by RootsAir
What Was Like Aeroflot During Soviet Times? posted Sat Apr 22 2006 05:11:40 by YAK42
Aeroflot: Where Does It Operate Soviet A/C? posted Thu Feb 16 2006 23:15:56 by QuestAir
Aeroflot - No Soviet Planes by 2010 posted Wed Feb 1 2006 18:45:13 by Diamond
How Bad Are Loads On Aeroflot From SVO-CAI? posted Tue Jan 25 2005 06:01:20 by Malaysia
Aeroflot During The Communist Era posted Sat Jan 12 2002 12:18:26 by SK A340
JAL/Aeroflot Soviet AL Code-share? posted Fri Aug 17 2001 03:15:06 by Jiml1126
End Of Soviet Aeroflot posted Tue Jul 3 2001 03:59:04 by RedAirForce
Why Aeroflot, Only One Hub City? posted Tue Feb 6 2007 20:21:25 by RootsAir