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Unreliable Fleet Members?  
User currently offlineGoinv From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 264 posts, RR: 2
Posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 15275 times:

Having spent a considerable length of my career working for the railway here in the UK, there were always locomotives that were "quirky" or unreliable. Some would have a reputation with train crews or maintenance people. One or two engines were even renumbered to try and end the bad "aura" or superstition that surrounded them. I also believe some ships have the same problem.

My question is this:- Do airliners suffer similar problems?

Are there any mechanics out there who know of any particular planes that always have problems? Are there any pilots who dread flying a particular registration because of it's quirks? Or, are all planes engineered and maintained to such a high standard, that this never happens?

Does anyone have stories concerning a particluar plane - be it current or past?

I refer to individual members of a fleet not makes / models. I.E.:- A FakeAir 767 (T-FAKE) may be more reliable than a FakeAir 767 (T-LIAR). This is not intended to be a debate as to whether 767's are more reliable than 737's etc.


Be who you are, The world was made to measure for your smile. So Smile.
27 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26339 posts, RR: 76
Reply 1, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 15178 times:

The Spirit of Delta has always been known as a bit of a hangar queen. Probably DL brass sabotaging her to show how employee cooperation is a bad thing  Yeah sure


Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineGkirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24899 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 15152 times:

G-BNWH at BA, the 767 that flies MAN-JFK is also known as G-TECH  Wink/being sarcastic


When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineDavid_itl From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 7359 posts, RR: 14
Reply 3, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 14868 times:
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Last summer, it was quite common for BA to subcharter Titan/Flightline aircraft every day for MAN operations as various members of the based fleet decided that they'd prefer to remain on the ground rarther than go in the air; occasionally there were a couple of subchartered aircraft.

David


User currently offlineCF-CPI From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 1035 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 14837 times:

I've heard NW employees refer to A320 N302US as "Christine - the Airbus from hell", but for all I know, her demons have be exorcised.

User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 24707 posts, RR: 46
Reply 5, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 14755 times:

All airlines have certain aircraft that have higher ratio of technical snags versus their fleet mates.

Often these problems are of repetitive basis on that particular plane. For instance constant electrical problems, auto pilot issues, IFE issues, etc...

Just like anything mechanical its all subject to failure.




From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8440 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 14713 times:
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SAA had an A300 that seemed more trouble prone than the rest of the fleet, ZS-SDD was known in the airline as "double disaster".

My wife was an FA on board once CPT-JNB when the gear wasn't indicating three green for landing, they flew by the tower a couple of times before landing safely.




After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineBhxforever From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2001, 564 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 14662 times:

Apparently its one of MONs A320s thats the most "jinxed" aircraft in the UK followed by one of its A300s. The A320 is G-MONX I think.

So not the much publicized G-BNWH

[Edited 2005-01-31 22:19:03]

User currently offline717-200 From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 601 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 23 hours ago) and read 14608 times:

I can remember when wew had the nine's at FL ship/tail #933 was one that
i tried to avoid. It was one of the nine DC9-32's that Valujet acquired from
THY Turkish Airlines.



72S 733 734 735 73G 738 742 752 763 E190 M82 M83
User currently offlineArgonaut From UK - Scotland, joined Dec 2004, 421 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 14539 times:

A slightly different twist to the same thread:

Some airlines appear to have their private superstitions. For example, around 25 years ago, one of Dan-Air's Boeing 727s flew into a mountain on Tenerife; sadly, all souls on board were lost. The particular aircraft was G-BDAN, which, for obvious reasons, the airline had specially registered with those letters.

Years later, BAe leased a BAe 146 to Dan-Air, and, thinking they were paying the airline a compliment, went to the trouble of re-registering the aircraft G-ODAN. Dan-Air coughed politely, then swiftly re-re-registered it. It seems they (or was it the crews?) were squeamish about having another Alpha November in the fleet....especially a Delta Alpha November.

I once heard from a retired BOAC/BA captain why the airline's VC10 registration sequence (G-ARVA to G-ARVM) conspicuously missed out "G-ARVD". The official reason was that "VD" was unseemly, since it stood for "Venereal Disease". The truth was that a previous Victor Delta--G-AOVD, a Britannia 312--had crashed on a post-maintenance check flight with the loss of all the crew, leaving the call-sign letters with "unhappy connotations." I'm inclined to believe the story, because my contact had been with the airline for decades and had flown both the Britannia and the VC10.

Turning the trouble-prone aircraft idea on its head: I recall correspondance in "Flight" magazine some time in the 1960s discussing a particular DC-4 (perhaps a C-54) that had been in service with British United Airways. It seems it flew rather better and with fewer problems than its peers. Its registration happened to be G-APID, so naturally its crews knew it as "Rapid Gapid."

Argonaut



'the rank is but the guinea stamp'
User currently offlineSaxon From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 83 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 14515 times:

MYT had, and still have a few aircraft that were known to go tech quite a lot.

The DC10-10s they had were occaisionally getting delayed and had problems, as I experienced. Luckily they have moved on to another operator.

The Boeing 757 G-PIDS, again of MYT is known as being a bit of a beast and has had more than its fair share of techs in its time too.



I can see Paradise by the Runway lights!
User currently offlineFbgdavidson From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 3697 posts, RR: 28
Reply 11, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 22 hours ago) and read 14476 times:

G-BNLB - Bird Never Leaves Base. One of BAs earlier 744s. I found this out only to later discover I had been on board BNLB on a flight to SFO and we had a two hour delay leaving LHR because of a technical problem!


"My first job was selling doors, door to door, that's a tough job innit" - Bill Bailey
User currently offlineBoeing7E7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 14428 times:

Skywest - N198SW

Pain in the ass. Hangar queen POS if I ever saw one. But that was 10 years ago, so who knows.

She even survived an engine fire....

http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=20001208X07943&key=1



User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5720 posts, RR: 11
Reply 13, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 14362 times:

Braniff had a DC-8... must have been a -30 series... that was called "little blue." The crews loved it... it had some problems, but nothing that would prevent the flight from leaving. A stewardess friend told me that the coffee pots would NEVER work right, you had to fool with them a lot and hope for the best. BUT- she says the flight crews loved her, because she flew great and never gave any mechanical trouble. As a consequence, she and her peers always hoped to see little blue at the gate for their flights.
R


User currently offlineFourstripe From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 98 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 14165 times:

For American Eagle's DFW Saab fleet, N222NE is the POS. We also know her as "Christine, the plane from hell." Rumor has it she caught fire in the factory...

-fourstripe



“Aviation is proof that given, the will, we have the capacity to achieve the impossible.” - Edward Vernon Rickenbacker
User currently offlineRyanAFAMSP From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 14023 times:

Hey there have got to be some United people on this thread that remember Christine, our DC-10-10 N1848U. For the insiders, she was the sole ex-Western series -10 that was overwater equipped with a lower lobe galley, making her a ""PG" series aircraft (as opposed to the overwater "PH" airplanes with main deck galleys and the non-overwater "PP" airplanes). I only worked her once, and the pilots told us to review our evac checklists with extra care because we rolled on departure. Lots of electrical problems and unexplained irregularities.

We retired her in late 1999. Don't miss those 0500 report LAS turns out of ORD that we did with Christine or one of the remaining, very beat up series 30s. In a way they all felt like Christine....


User currently offlineAerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 7110 posts, RR: 13
Reply 16, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 13865 times:

So why are they all called Christine??? Thats AA/NW/UA that all have them called Christine

User currently offlinePA101 From Germany, joined Jan 2005, 491 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 13856 times:

So why are they all called Christine??? Thats AA/NW/UA that all have them called Christine

My guess: probably due to Stephen Kings book "Christine", where a classic car with that name has its own, mean personality.


User currently offlineCF-CPI From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 1035 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 6847 times:

I did a web search for N1848U and came up with the info that it was the last DC-10-10 built. Delivered to UA in late September 1982, it would have arrived after the first 767s came along. I didn't see anything indicating a Western connection with N1848U, and one website indicated the plane left UA for FedEx in 1990. Anyway, good riddance maybe.

User currently offlineRyanAFAMSP From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2788 times:

CF-CPI,

Huh, that is wierd. Maybe I am remembering the reg # wrong. I should go sort through my old flight manuals, because I could easily find the reg# because Christine was an oddball by the time I worked for United. She was the only series 10 that had a lower-lobe galley. That means she came to us after United converted all of the series 10s to main deck galleys, which I believe was in the mid-1980s. By my time, our four remaining -30s (of which I believe 1 was ex-Pan Am and 3 were ex-World Airways) and Christine had the lower lobe galleys. Try N1839U. The rings a bell as well. And I am almost sure Christine was sold to us by Delta after the Western aquisition. I would love to know the answer on this.


User currently offlineVatry From Ireland, joined Sep 2004, 104 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 3 days 3 hours ago) and read 2765 times:

Try 1849U, arrived with United in 89 and now with Fed-Ex as N357FE and an MD10

User currently offlineNwafflyer From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 1050 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2609 times:

What about the everglades crash, where the co pilot kept re-appearing -- was that Eastern???

User currently offlinePA101 From Germany, joined Jan 2005, 491 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 2593 times:

What about the everglades crash, where the co pilot kept re-appearing -- was that Eastern???

Yeah - that was Eastern. They used some surviving spares on other aircraft, and all of these L1011 were believed to get ghost appearences. One particular L1011 - that served later on with DL - got several items for the lower galley, and the legend went on for this particular ac even when it was flying for Delta.

I read a book once, where the author accompanied one DL L1011 for more than a week in the early Nineties, and it was that specific ac. He found out, it had a pretty bad incident in the 80s, I believe in LGA, with parts of the wing being ripped off, but fortunately no casualties. It went on flying for years after its repair.

I could check on the reg, but have to find that book first.


User currently offlineFlaps From United States of America, joined Feb 2000, 1250 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 2502 times:

BN's Calder 727 carried the nickname "sneaky snake". It had originally been in Frontier's fleet and apparently had been handled roughly in their service. There is more info in the book "Flying Colors" and also I believe in some of author/pilot Len Morgan's writings. The bad reputation came from her squirrely handling qualities and the nickname from a snake shaped squiggle on one of her nacelles.

User currently offlineDc863 From Denmark, joined Jun 1999, 1558 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (9 years 5 months 1 week 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2492 times:

One of PA's 747-123s from AA named Clipper Beacon Light had chronic mech trouble with her JT9s and hydraulic problems.

25 Post contains links ClassicLover : Apparently Super VC10 G-ASGN had an error with the dopplar radios that were always 3 degrees off, and the ground checks showed nothing. This went on f
26 Eta unknown : Don't know if the problems have been fixed now, but if a Royal Brunei 767 ever went tech, 90% chance it was V8-RBF. Oh the telexes we would receive- "
27 PA101 : The threat was to withdraw the aircraft from service until it was fixed, and jobs hung in the balance... when the aircraft was hijacked by the PLO and
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