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Door Comes Off Of A Delta B772 In ATL  
User currently offlinePilottim747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1607 posts, RR: 5
Posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 6948 times:

I was just reading the FAA's Preliminary Accident and Incident Data and found a very curious incident described. On January 29th, it says that the L1 door of N650DA came off after the aircraft rolled back from the gate.

"N860DA, DELTA AIRLINES DAL11, A BOEING 777ACFT, WHILE PARKED AT THE GATE, ROLLED BACK FROM THE JETWAY AND THE L1 DOOR CAME OFF, NO INJURIES REPORTED, DAMAGE UNKNOWN, ATLANTA, GA"

Delta Flt. 11 runs LGW-ATL. The incident must've happened just after the aircraft had pulled into the gate. Anyone have any information on this flight or aircraft?


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pilottim747


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20 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineCALMSP From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3923 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 6895 times:
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possibly not chalked correctly.......this can happen very easily if that is the case.....plane rolls back and the door catches the jetway and comes off.....almost ran into that problem when the captain released the brakes on an F9 319 and the plane rolled back and caught the jet-bridge..


okay, I'm waiting for the rich to spread the wealth around to me. Please mail your checks to my house.
User currently offlineBoeing Nut From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 6736 times:

One of the great engineering ideas that went into the 777 was to protect the aircrafts integrity when such an incident happens. The hinges on the doors are engineered to be "weak" enough that if there is this type of jetway incident, they will simply shear off without damaging the rest of the aircraft. I'll be this aircraft was fixed in a matter of several hours.

User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31667 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6042 times:

Shear Pins/Links doing their job I guess.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineGearup From Canada, joined Dec 2000, 578 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 5652 times:

One of the great engineering ideas that went into the 777 was to protect the aircrafts integrity when such an incident happens. The hinges on the doors are engineered to be "weak" enough that if there is this type of jetway incident, they will simply shear off without damaging the rest of the aircraft. I'll be this aircraft was fixed in a matter of several hours.

This is a common feature on many aircraft and is not a 777 innovation.



I have no memory of this place.
User currently offlineAV757 From Colombia, joined Apr 2004, 660 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 5582 times:
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The first Boeing 777 to have the shear pins on door 1L demonstrate their design capability occurred on the protoype on a demo at BOG, at the AV terminal Puente Aereo when the airplane arrived, the gate was placed in position and with the excess weight of all the people on it who wanted to see the airplane while on exhibit, it collapsed and the airplane had a major delay departing BOG to SCL where it was going to shown in FIDAE aeronautical show until parts arrived for the repair.

AV757


User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5722 posts, RR: 11
Reply 6, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 5390 times:

Well that feature is certainly not present on A320s or DC-9-80s.
Check photos in this database with doors ripped off and much damage done!


User currently offlineAkjetBlue From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 790 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 5038 times:

What ever happened to having the aircraft doors retracting in the celing? Wasn't that a much better idea to totally prevent such an incident? Are any aircraft still made with those types of doors?


Save a horse! Ride a Cowboy!
User currently offlineAUAE From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 296 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4814 times:

My only thought on retracting doors is that a blown slide can cause a lot of damage and harm to crew (if it happens when the door is going up, and it is still attached to the door).

Shawn



Air transport is just a glorified bus operation. -Michael O'Leary, Ryanair's chief executive
User currently offlineQwerty From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 383 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 4 hours ago) and read 4808 times:

What ever happened to having the aircraft doors retracting in the celing? Wasn't that a much better idea to totally prevent such an incident? Are any aircraft still made with those types of doors?

That design makes emergency egress a problem.


User currently offlineFriendlySkies From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 4105 posts, RR: 5
Reply 10, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 4731 times:

The only aircraft that ever had the interior doors were the DC-10, MD-11, and 767 IIRC (the Caravelle's door slid inside, but didn't go into to ceiling).

I always wondered what the point of this design was, it seems unsafe in an emergency.


User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5722 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 4727 times:

The 767 is!!! 76 doors are powered up into the ceiling, just like the old DC-10s and L-1011s... and MD-11s I guess.

User currently offline777ER From New Zealand, joined Dec 2003, 12082 posts, RR: 18
Reply 12, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 4688 times:
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Doors that go into the ceiling would be a better option.

User currently offlineHa763 From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 3632 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 4543 times:
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That design makes emergency egress a problem.

It is not a problem for emergency evacs. If it was, there is no way it would have been certified. In fact, I've been to an emergency evac certification. The FAA requires that airlines demonstrate that the slides from 50% of the exits can be inflated within 15 secs from when the emergency lights come on. This is in addition to the manufacturer showing that an emergency evac can be done within 90 sec using half of the exits on the aircraft with the max number of pax on board.

The reason the type of doors found on the DC-10/L-1011/767 are not found on more widebody aircraft is that the doors are heavier than a door that swings out due to counterweights. The counterweights allow the door to open/close a lot easier.


User currently offlineQwerty From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 383 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 4496 times:

It is not a problem for emergency evacs

We're both right. We just have different opinions.

For me, if my garage is on fire, I'm using the side door, swinging out, not the main door, opening back-and-up inside the house. And that's with no analogous structural house damage that might make main door operation difficult.


User currently offlineAirgeek12 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 4427 times:

how could this happen if the a/c doors were already locked? *(i think)* oh well.. interesting thing. at least they got it fixed =)

User currently offlineGearup From Canada, joined Dec 2000, 578 posts, RR: 1
Reply 16, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 4408 times:

I have seen several B737-200 doors, both PAX and catering service doors torn off due to airbridge/catering truck incidents over the years without significant damage to the aircraft (besides failed hinges or scratched paint) and that design is as old as the hills. The 737 door is basically the same as the 727, 707/720 and is obviously still in use today in the 737NG series. I still love that old Boeing plug door, simple mechanism but very effective and reasonably easy to maintain.

GU



I have no memory of this place.
User currently offlineRJ777 From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 1784 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (9 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 4041 times:

Any pics of the damage?

User currently offlineTu154m From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 678 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (9 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3991 times:

Jan 29th was the day ATL had about 2inches of ice. When the a/c parked at the gate, the wheels were properly chocked. The Capt then released the parking brake after getting the "chocks in" signal from the ground crew, as is normal. Problem is, chocks don't work very well on 2 inches of ice, and the plane....and chocks......slid back. The door caught on the jetway and departed the a/c. Stuff like this isn't really all that uncommon. Planes are always getting banged up when they are at the gate.........very crowded with alot of activity.


CEOs should swim with cement flippers!
User currently offlineCORULEZ05 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (9 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 21 hours ago) and read 3984 times:

"Planes are always getting banged up when they are at the gate"...pretty scary statement if true.......maybe these plane handlers need to be more careful........

User currently offlineLongbowPilot From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 577 posts, RR: 4
Reply 20, posted (9 years 5 months 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3874 times:
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Oh hell no!

Excuse me sir, but do you have any idea how many flights a day operate. Ground guys are very safe. We choc the equpiment while they are static (next to plane or parked off the ramp). We are always careful and give a lot of respect to aircraft. It is a demanding job and accidents happen. I bet you sit in a climate controled building and work. If you work outside than you know the demands of the climate on the body. In general if the aircraft is on ICE, you cannot blame anyone buy mother nature. REad the post and don't go throwing blam on the ground guys, they work EXTREMELY hard in any element thrown at them except lightning.



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