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Latin American Routes -- Why So Much Luggage/cargo  
User currently offlineSsides From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 21
Posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3629 times:

I have been reading these boards for several years now, and I always see people writing about how routes to Latin America and the Caribbean generally require aircraft that hold a high proportion of cargo or baggage. This has been given as the reason why AA still keeps its A300s around, and its ATRs flying Eagle routes in the Caribbean.

Why is this? Do Latin Americans generally carry more baggage? If so, why?

Just wanted to get a clear, coherent explanation of this phenomenon.

Thanks!


"Lose" is not spelled with two o's!!!!
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19236 posts, RR: 52
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 3596 times:

I believe Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis, etc., often have a lot of luggage when flying to and from Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, etc.

[Edited 2005-02-04 21:02:16]


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineFLY2LIM From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1185 posts, RR: 10
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 3579 times:

Speaking mainly in generalizations, many Latin Americans immigrate to the US seeking a better future for themselves and their families. Many live here for extended periods of time before returning to visit their countries. When they do, they bring goods for their relatives that are still living in the conditions they left. The trips tend to be once a year or less so they try to "pack in" as much as they can.
On my last trip to LIM, I sat next to a woman who had moved to California from Peru and had not returned for 12 years. I'm sure that her bags were full.
When I was checking in for the flight, a family that was obviously hispanic was trying to repack their luggage. They had stuffed a huge duffel bag to the rim and it obviously was too large and too heavy given the restrictions at AA. With the recent prices for excess baggage, that family was probably looking at a very hefty bill to take all those things home.
There are certainly other reasons for the extra luggage but I'm only pointing out what I've observed through the years.
FLY2LIM



Faucett. La primera linea aerea del Peru.
User currently offlineEddieDude From Mexico, joined Nov 2003, 7592 posts, RR: 42
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3435 times:

Well, flights from SAT, IAH, LAX and MIA (maybe other cities too) to MEX usually have lots of Mexican passengers who are coming back from shopping trips, so they bring thousands of dollars worth of clothes, gadgets, presents, etc.


Next flights: MEX-GRU (AM 77E), GRU-GIG (JJ A320), SDU-CGH (G3 73H), GRU-MEX (JJ A332).
User currently offline757MDE From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 1753 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3393 times:

Not only international.

Here in Colombia people use to carry lots of luggage even for domestic flights.



I gladly accept donations to pay for flight hours! This thing draws man...
User currently offlineArcano From Chile, joined Mar 2004, 2409 posts, RR: 23
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3378 times:

Hi

Not exactly. Latin America is, in relative terms, far from the "economical/population" core of the world, let's say USA, Europe and Asia (at least in the case of South America, and further more for the southern cone, where I belong)

Thus, out airlines need aircraft able to flight long distances. You understand that you can perfectly fly from SCL to MAD or MIA on a 320, 737 or a 757 making the porper stops. The question is: would you like to?

In terms of quality service (and in this term, trust me South American carriers still have a lot to tell), our airlines need long range a/c, and if you do the math, long range is usually associated to larger freight capacity.

Hence... latin airlines have a huge potencial and facility for cargo, unlike let's say AA or UA, with most of their a/c narrowbodies.

This is why ailines like LAN became so profitable, they have a huge cargo business, so they don't depend that much of the pax variable demand.

Do you get the point?

Regards )( Arcano



in order: 721,146,732,763,722,343,733,320,772,319,752,321,88,83,744,332,100,738, 333, 318, 77W, 78, 773 and 380
User currently offlineCORULEZ05 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3315 times:

Contrary to popular belief, we AREN'T pack rats if that's what you all are implying.......we just like to bring as much as we can on our trips...just in case.....better to be safe than sorry!

User currently offlineTonyBurr From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1036 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3276 times:

It amazes me in LIM that passengers push luggage carts loaded with big boxes, they get right through customs without being stopped, and I am stopped for my one suitcase. Do people experience having to pay customs duty on bringing these large boxes/suitcases into a country?

User currently offlineM404 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 2227 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 3270 times:
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Try packing all those wonderful jute tied cardboard boxes out of Manila. As for India I know that much of it is food and spices for the extended families already here.


Less sarcasm and more thought equal better understanding
User currently offlineN405MX From Mexico, joined May 2004, 1378 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3223 times:

Here in Mexico a lot of passengers take a lot of baggage, for example, in MTY, the routes to MXL and VER are students that take almost their entire house with them, and when they go back , the process is the same, so they travel with a LOT of luggage, and get very angry when they have to pay the overweight, also, a lot of people travels from MTY to CCS, and men, they really take a lot of luggage (in Mexico we say, cargaron hasta con el perico, that translated will be: they packed even the parrot), the average weight that people to CCS take from MTY is about 60-70 kg, others take 30-40, but some cases, 4 passengers took with them almost 300kg  Wow!
But like somebody said before, those are people who carry stuff to their families, and/or friends, that´s why (in part), they carry all that luggage.

Regards



Life is what happens when you have other plans.....
User currently offlineFLY2LIM From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1185 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 3199 times:

Arcano:
With all due respect, this is what I have observed, live, in person. This is not some generalization. I can tell you that any flight I have boarded in either Braniff, Eastern, AA, AeroPeru, RG, AR, or any other airline I have flown to LIM, especially from Miami, always has had people entering the airplane with LARGE bags of stuff. In LIM, they haul large suitcases through customs.
Remember, we used to live in a country that didn't have all the fun amenities found in the US. Now we have everything but most things cost more in Peru than in the US. And there is still the feeling for some people that going on an airplane is a big adventure and they need to bring things for everyone.
So, the explanation about the different aircraft types does make sense to a "civilized" country like Chile and Argentina, but to Peru the rules are a little different, amigo mio. Again, my observations.

Contrary to popular belief, we AREN'T pack rats if that's what you all are implying.......we just like to bring as much as we can on our trips...just in case.....better to be safe than sorry!

Not sure if you were being humorous because you did contradict yourself on that one.

It amazes me in LIM that passengers push luggage carts loaded with big boxes, they get right through customs without being stopped, and I am stopped for my one suitcase. Do people experience having to pay customs duty on bringing these large boxes/suitcases into a country?

Tony:
My experience has been different. While I don't believe that the red/green light system is at all "honest" (I believe someone controls it and certain signals are used), I have noticed that the people with excessive baggage usually get the red light. It's been my observation in the past 5-8 years.

FLY2LIM



Faucett. La primera linea aerea del Peru.
User currently offlineNavega From United States of America, joined Nov 1999, 741 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 3125 times:

In regards to the US/Mexico passengers, although you
can find anything you have in the USA and I do mean everything, passengers who migrated here from small towns, tend to take gifts to their families and townspeople.

These passengers tend to travel only during July and August and during the month of December.

That is why all airlines from the USA to Mexico have baggage embargoes where they limit to 2 pieces and they
limit the weight and size.

I have noticed that during the past 5 years, less and less
passengers to Mexico carrying the infamous TV's that were
a staple during the hight season.

Although they can find the same TV's or electronics in Mexico and recently at cheaper prices, it is a way of showing that "I MADE IT IN THE USA AND HAVE A GOOD PAYING JOB".

I have seen Korean and Indian flights with much more
luggage that Mexico flights.


User currently offlineRNOcommctr From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 827 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 3096 times:

It is my understanding that electronics like computers and MP3 players are cheaper in the U.S. than in Mexico, at least according to my Mexican step-daughters who bought such items here while visiting their mom here in the U.S.

And yes, one of my step-daughters did have to re-pack her bag at the ticket counter, removing stuff from her checked bag into a carry-on bag. The airlines are very strict about the weight restrictions and the over-limit charges are very expensive.



I'm sorry, ma'am, I don't work for the airline.
User currently offlineArcano From Chile, joined Mar 2004, 2409 posts, RR: 23
Reply 13, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2993 times:

Not sure if you were being humorous because you did contradict yourself on that one.

Fly2LIM: I think you got confused, you were not replying me, but to CORULEZ05...  Smile/happy/getting dizzy

I have another idea regarding this issue: we have to remember that during the 70s, 80s and early 90s, most of Latin American countries (maybe with the sole exception of Chile) followed CEPAL's direction about to protect the country industry by taxing imports, so duties for imported porducts were insane.

So probably many Latin Americans took the chance when travelling abroad for buying many product that, at the time, they just couldn't buy at home, specially sports clothing, electronics, toys, etc.

Even when we can still find some of this "old school" direction in our Latin America, the difference is every time less important.

Regards )(



in order: 721,146,732,763,722,343,733,320,772,319,752,321,88,83,744,332,100,738, 333, 318, 77W, 78, 773 and 380
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8969 posts, RR: 39
Reply 14, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2978 times:

That is why all airlines from the USA to Mexico have baggage embargoes where they limit to 2 pieces and they limit the weight and size.

I think all airlines from anywhere have these restrictions, don't they?

I'm not sure about Mexico, but eletronics are cheaper in the USA than here in Brazil due to high import taxes. However, I found softwares (depending on which ones) to be about the same price as in the USA.

As for me, mostly gifts, But I do take a lot of stuff on trips and I'll agree with what CORULEZ05 said "...just in case.....better to be safe than sorry!"

Cheers,

PPVRA



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineFLY2LIM From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1185 posts, RR: 10
Reply 15, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2968 times:

Arcano:
I didn't get confused, although it sure looked like I did. After the italics, I was talking to the other person but didn't address my reply. Sorry about that.
You thread pretty much summarizes what I tried to say, only more eloquently.

I have another idea regarding this issue: we have to remember that during the 70s, 80s and early 90s, most of Latin American countries (maybe with the sole exception of Chile) followed CEPAL's direction about to protect the country industry by taxing imports, so duties for imported porducts were insane.

So probably many Latin Americans took the chance when travelling abroad for buying many product that, at the time, they just couldn't buy at home, specially sports clothing, electronics, toys, etc.

Even when we can still find some of this "old school" direction in our Latin America, the difference is every time less important.


The only other thing I would add is that peruvians seem to think that something that came from the US is "better" or more "glamorous" when, in reality, the local products from the Mercosur countries are just as good.

FLY2LIM



Faucett. La primera linea aerea del Peru.
User currently onlineEZEIZA From Argentina, joined Aug 2004, 4967 posts, RR: 25
Reply 16, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 2972 times:

Slightly off topic,

I don't know for all Latin America, but from Europe to EZE the baggaje limit is now only 20 kg when it used to be 2 pieces of 32 kg each (don't know of all airlines, but i'm sure it's like that for IB, LAN, A4). My question is why and when did they limit this? 20 kg is nothing for such a long trip! How is it for other destinations from Europe to Latin America?

regards



Carp aunque ganes o pierdas ...
User currently offlineZippyjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 5488 posts, RR: 13
Reply 17, posted (9 years 8 months 3 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 2822 times:

Our flights to the house of Mickey MCO are usually heavy on baggage. Some of the families pack like they are going on Survivor. However, I've noticed, the mother lode of taking everything including the kitchen sink are passengers flying FI. Many Icelandic passengers travel with these hard psychedelic colored bags that look like they were all the rage when The Man From Uncle had first run episodes on American TV. (middle 1960s.) Smile/happy/getting dizzy


I'm Zippyjet & I approve of this message!
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