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What Is The "polderbaan" (AMS)?  
User currently offlineMason From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 748 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 5076 times:

With the thousands of new pictures uploaded to the database daily from AMS (the usual KLM fare, I don't know why we need so many pics, but they are usually nice), I noticed the usage of the word "polderbaan". Is this Dutch for runway, or something? Thanks.

10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAirKas1 From Netherlands, joined Dec 2003, 4027 posts, RR: 55
Reply 1, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 5055 times:

It's the name of our fifth runway. We also have the Kaagbaan, Buitenveldertbaan, Zwanenburgbaan and Aalsmeerbaan

Kas


User currently offlineMason From United States of America, joined Jun 1999, 748 posts, RR: 1
Reply 2, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 5046 times:

Is it common to name the runways? Is there any other airport with this? What do the words mean, or are they just names? Interesting.

User currently offlineJHSfan From Denmark, joined Apr 2004, 469 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 4952 times:

"Polder" means land recovered from the sea by building dams and then pumping out the water between the dams. Such land is below sea-level.
From http://www.nattfamily.org/holland.htm

As a Danish non-Dutch speaking person my guess would be that baan in this case means runway. Am I right?

Yours in realtime
JHSfan



Look at me, I´m riding high, I´m the airbornmaster of the sky...
User currently offlineSllevin From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 3376 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 4940 times:

It's Dutch for "Brussels."  Smile

I've timed taxi times from the Polderbaan and it's typically 15-17 minutes to get to a gate (assuming no delays during the taxi).

Seems kinda odd when you arrive in on 35 minutes of flight time from Heathrow  Smile

Steve


User currently offlineEmbraer145 From Netherlands, joined Feb 2001, 311 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 4925 times:

JHSFan

Quoting JHSfan (reply 3):
As a Danish non-Dutch speaking person my guess would be that baan in this case means runway. Am I right?


Correct  Smile/happy/getting dizzy



DAI - Dutch Aviation Images.
User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3316 posts, RR: 34
Reply 6, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4884 times:

Yes, "baan" in the wider sense means road, path, way.

The name of the "baan" relates to the name of the specific area (or village) where it is located. (i.e. Aalsmeer)
It is a lot more explicit than to call it 01-19 or whatever.

The definition of "polder" is incorrect, it applies to land which is below sea level.
The fact that there might be a dam or pumps is irrelevant.


User currently offlineAMSSpotter From Netherlands, joined Feb 2005, 271 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4848 times:

The word "polder" means "dry-making". Actually, ALL of AMS is situated inside a dry-making (the former Haarlemmer lake), including the runways. So, naming the new runway the "Polderbaan" doesn't really make sense. However, the general public came up with that name (there was some sort of contest if I remember well) and Schiphol management respected the outcome.

User currently offlineAMSSpotter From Netherlands, joined Feb 2005, 271 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 4817 times:

Quoting Iakobos (reply 6):
The definition of "polder" is incorrect, it applies to land which is below sea level.
The fact that there might be a dam or pumps is irrelevant


You're wrong. The word polder under the Dutch definition is (and I quote our official dictionary, the Van Dale):
"door dijken omgeven stuk land, met beheersbare waterstand" or in English: A piece of land that is surrounded by dams and with a manageable water-level.

The general public here think of a polder as a former lake or (inner)sea that has been surrounded by dams and pumped dry.


User currently offlineIakobos From Belgium, joined Aug 2003, 3316 posts, RR: 34
Reply 9, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4643 times:

Just for the sake of the (short) argument:
the specifically Dutch definition of polder by Van Dale is in itself a polderisation of the Dutch language. (polder Dutch)

There are polders (low lying lands) in eg. France and Belgium, many of them have never seen a pump, and some of them are not surrounded by artificial dykes, still they are polders.

True however that in the Kingdom of The Netherlands a polder is de facto considered artificially (man-made) dried up land.


User currently offlineMauriceB From Netherlands, joined Aug 2004, 2490 posts, RR: 25
Reply 10, posted (9 years 9 months 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 4613 times:

long time ago the place where i live was a lake, but because of the danger the lake brought they decided to dry it. so were schiphol is right now, were fishes swiming a long time ago.

this is the polderbaan


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