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Medical Emergencies: Should There Be A Doc Onboard?  
User currently offlineRootsAir From Costa Rica, joined Feb 2005, 4186 posts, RR: 40
Posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3650 times:

As a med student, this is the opportunity to combine my future job with my greatest passion that aviation represents.

I have heard many a times that medical emergencies occur on board. For example, I heard about this woman a couple of years ago who got a heart(?) problem on a BA flight from LHR-HKG or vice versa and that a surgeon that was on board actually opened her with the knives that were to be used for passengers' meals
1) Can anybody tell me more about that story?

Second of all, it takes time between the moment where the passenger's state becomes an emergency and the time an airplane is cleared for the emergency landing....even worst when its over an ocean.

2)Has anybody ever experienced that type of situation while they were on board and if yes could you explain me how the procedure was?

3) How often does this happen?

4) Do you think its necessary to have a doctor on long haul flights (in case this is more common than we think)?


A man without the knowledge of his past history,culture and origins is like a tree without roots
42 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineUA777222 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 3348 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3615 times:

1) I have not heard of such a story. Seems to be far fetched seeing how such knives shouldn't be on board an a/c regardless of pre/post 9/11. The day a doctor chooses to open someone with a steak knife is the day I'm asking my parents to change their insurance.

2) On SFO-HKG an elderly man in F had trouble dealing with taking meds at a high alt. and having a bad response to them. The a/c advised HKG of their issue and after we landed we were all instructed to sit to allow the medics arrive and assist the man. After about 30min. the a/c was de-planed and while passing through first the number 1, pilot, and medics were dealing with the passenger and assessing their options with dealing with customs, family, and bags. I thought the airline and the medics handled the situation very well.

3) I would say its hard to get an exact idea. It's not enough to be a common thing at every airport. It's hard to judge how the man in XXX is going to respond to his med's after taking them with a glass of wine. Works well at home but home isn't 39,000. Just hard to tell.

4) It took 4 planes to crash for airlines to put air guards on a/c so I highly doubt we'll see on board medics any time soon. F/a's are trained to deal with emergencies to a degree. SQ, as many know, have "death beds" where dead body's can be stored when on ultra-long-haul flights. I would say that there is no real need for a medic on each and every flight. And putting them on a few isn't going to work b/c you can assess the risk of an in flight emergency..

To sum it up there is no need to have an in-flight doctor hired and paid by the airlines to prevent in-flight deaths. What a f/a can't do in the sky there are people and proceedures on the ground to deal with such events. That's really all airlines can do at this point unless there are advances in medical scanning that can say when, how, or why you are going to have say a heart attack or stroke.

Thanks,

Matt



"It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark."
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3602 times:



Quoting RootsAir (Thread starter):
4) Do you think its necessary to have a doctor on long haul flights (in case this is more common than we think)?

Probably not. I don't think (in the current market) the number of times such a service is needed actually justifies cost of providing a doctor.

Remember, in the old days flight attendants were all registered nurses and that requirement seems to have faded years ago, so it seems that providing a doctor would be an evolutionary step backwards.

Maybe with something huge like the A380 there will be enough pax that you can get the DRCPSM (Doctor Cost Per Seat Mile  Smile) down far enough that it would be viable.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineRootsAir From Costa Rica, joined Feb 2005, 4186 posts, RR: 40
Reply 3, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3540 times:



Quoting UA777222 (Reply 1):
1) I have not heard of such a story. Seems to be far fetched seeing how such knives shouldn't be on board an a/c regardless of pre/post 9/11. The day a doctor chooses to open someone with a steak knife is the day I'm asking my parents to change their insurance.

This was before 9/11

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 2):
Remember, in the old days flight attendants were all registered nurses and that requirement seems to have faded years ago, so it seems that providing a doctor would be an evolutionary step backwards.

that's a shame !!!!



A man without the knowledge of his past history,culture and origins is like a tree without roots
User currently offlineVHXLR8 From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 500 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3529 times:



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 2):
Remember, in the old days flight attendants were all registered nurses and that requirement seems to have faded years ago, so it seems that providing a doctor would be an evolutionary step backwards.

This is true dude; but one must remember that nowadays, flight attendants must be qualified with a particular level of first aid training (varies from country to country). Combined with the medical equipment onboard these days, it really makes you wonder what's preferable; a registered nurse aboard an aircraft with little to no medical equipment, or a crew of highly first-aid trained flight attendants with modern medical technology at hand


User currently offlineCragley From Australia, joined Jul 2004, 427 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 3516 times:

Can you just imagine the legalities of the situation and how the Dr would be exposed to any litigation.

If someone had a heart attack on board and you saved their life, they could turn around and say they were fine and that you physically harmed them.

No airline would expose themselves to legal action.


User currently offlineMrniji From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3506 times:

4.) Considering, that on virtually every long-hau flight of mine a doc is called (mostly minor things, though), the question you asked is a very good one and needs to be seriously debated. I think having a doc on every flight is too much, rather is the present system of calling a doc sufficient. But maybe it would be worth training the captains on evaluating when to do an emergency landing. another possibility is to require a doc tb on board on flights which are over seas, as transatlantic or transpcific... good question, will think about this and come back later eventually  Wink

User currently offlineTGV From France, joined Dec 2004, 874 posts, RR: 20
Reply 7, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 3488 times:



Quoting RootsAir (Thread starter):
3) How often does this happen?

On my 200+ long-haul flights there have been 5 or 6 flights where the cabin crew asked for a doctor on the PA system.

In all cases more than one doctor was on-board and, when needed, handled the situation using medical supplies that are part of the aircraft equipment (no knives here, on AF at least !). Additionally some members of the cabin crew appeared to be trained in first aid.



Avoid 777 with 3-4-3 config in Y ! They are real sardine cans. (AF/KL for example)
User currently offlineCragley From Australia, joined Jul 2004, 427 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3467 times:

From my experience at RES, when Doctors are travelling on leisure, the majority actually called to ask to be listed as a standard passenger (Mr or Mrs) as they did not want to be identified as a Dr in case there was an inflight emergency.

It would show on the flight manifest if there was a Doctor on board and what seat number they were sitting in.

Imagine being on a flight for 12 hours and being woken in the middle of your holiday to perform duties.


User currently offlineZRH From Switzerland, joined Nov 1999, 5566 posts, RR: 36
Reply 9, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3438 times:

My father is a Doctor. He had at least three flights were he was needed because a passenger became seriously ill. But, as already somebody mentioned, on most long-haul flights there is probably a Doctor amongst the passengers. BTW I know that all Swiss flight attendants are trained on defibrillators (I don't know if this is the right word in English) in case of heart attacks.

User currently offlineJohnboy From United States of America, joined Aug 1999, 2586 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 3425 times:

It seems I remember reading an article some years back (within the past 5-7 years IIRC), where someone developed a pneumo while traveling on a flight out of Hong Kong, and an MD on board rigged a chest tube/water seal out of either a straw or pen, and jug of water.

I tried to do a search, and was unsuccessful. However, I did find some studies out of the journal, "Thorax," which might be interesting to you.

http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/57/4/289


User currently offlineSupa7E7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3419 times:

Probably a doctor would cost more than a pilot. A pilot is extremely expensive. We might as well have waterfalls and fairy lands on A380s, if we're going to double our costs like that.

User currently offlineAtco2b From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 1114 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3410 times:

Would Paramedics or Nurses be more sufficient? Probably a bit cheaper too Big grin


Hey, you want to go out for pizza and some sex? What, you don't like pizza?
User currently offlineTrident3 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 1013 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3398 times:

The Hong Kong story is true.
A woman was in a motorcycle accident on her way to the airport and managed to get on the flight with a broken arm and a punctured lung. There were two doctors on board the flight ,one a med student from Hong Kong and the other an A&E consultant from Nottingham, together they inserted a chest drain using a knife, a wire coathanger, a tube from an oxygen mask and a duty free bottle.
There were a number of coincidences that conspired to put all the right people on the flight
The woman was originaly booked on an earlier flight but changed to the later one because it was a smoking flight and her companion was a smoker
The consultant had been on duty at a hospital in Nottingham the night of the kegworth air crash. Because of this he had developed new trauma and triage systems for use in major disasters. He had been in Hong Kong lecturing on the new systems.



"We are the warrior race-Tough men in the toughest sport." Brian Noble, Head Coach, Great Britain Rugby League.
User currently offlineDrerx7 From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 5174 posts, RR: 8
Reply 14, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3391 times:

We had a medical emergency on my flight from San Juan. It was a Continental 737-800 from SJU to IAH; we were about 100 or so miles southeast of New Orleans when a lady a 2 rows behind me on the right side of the plane lost all color in her face and began breathing rough. For some strange reason the flight attendant came on and said "This is a reminder this is a non-smoking flight--it is against FAA regulations ....." People looked bewildered because there was no one visibly smoking--so we assumed that maybe someone lit up in the lav. Then they came on the PA and "Are there any medical personnel on board, we have a medical situation, please ring your call button if you are medical personnel or a physician" There happened to be a couple of doctors on board. The lady's face at this point was completely flushe--it looked like a live cadaver. Everyone was restless and looking at her. They brought out the oxygen tank for her and put the mask on her face; they got as much information from her and her husband and determined that we would need to make an emergency landing. By the time that decision was made we were over New Orleans but at 30,000+ feet. The captain came on at this point "Ladies and Gentlemen, as you may know we have a medical emergency on board and we have declared an emergency with air traffic control. We will be making a rapid decent and emergency landing into Houston" We were about 20mins from IAH at that point--we came in over Galveston Bay and the ship channel and landed on runway 27--he barely applied reverse thrust and spoilers--we shot right into our gate at Terminal E--time from touchdown to gate was under 2 mins no b.s. The plane was met by ambulance and personnel. By this time color had restored to the ladies face and they let passengers deplane before emergency personnel boarded.


Third Coast born, means I'm Texas raised
User currently offlineTrident3 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 1013 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 13 hours ago) and read 3375 times:

There was a couple of years ago a woman who collapsed on a flight (details unknown) Whem the cabin crew asked if there was a doctor on board half the plane stood up, they were heart specialists returning from a conference!


"We are the warrior race-Tough men in the toughest sport." Brian Noble, Head Coach, Great Britain Rugby League.
User currently offlineTimRees From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2001, 354 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3341 times:

Trident 3. I think you have the HKG story almost right...didn't the lady concerned fall off her horse I few days before the flight and had fractured a rib. As the aircraft climbed this lead to a tension pneumothorax which the doctors concerned treated by inserting a chest drain using make shift equipment including a biro and a coat hanger. Can't rememeber a steak knife being used. The other thing about this was that the procedure was performed mainly by the junior doctor yet the consultant took all the praise!

I am a GP and have helped on a medical emergency on a VS flight from LHR to LAX. It was 1996. We were somewhere over Greenland and there was a PA anouncement asking for a doctor. As I'd booked my ticket as Dr on this flight I felt obliged to make myself know to the flight crew. I was travelling with a junior surgeon. A few seats behind us an elderly man with a heart history (previous heart by-pass surgery and heart attack) was pretty unwell...sweating profusely, short of breath, pale and clamy. Looked pretty awful. We managed to get him onto the floor near a galley area and give oxygen, and start monitoring him. The VS 744's are equiped with a wide array of emergency drugs and a defibrillator (thankfully didn't need that). He didn't make a huge improvement to the first aid measures and we still had 6 hours (I suppose) to LAX. My colleague had to go up to speak with the captain (missed opportunity for me!) and the captain advised that we either had to divert then to Baffin Island or we would have to wait a further 3-4 hours before we could divert. It was our decision....what a responsibility. We decided with 3-4 hours to the next diversion airfield we couldn't chance this man's health incase he deteriorated. (Essentially, at FL390 there isn't a huge amount you can do to keep someone alive for hours on end without a medical team as you would have in an emergency room/cardiac department).
We decided we should divert to Iqaluit (Baffin Island). We had to dump fuel and secure the patient for landing. Apparently, diversions into Baffin Island are not that uncommon on medical emergencies.
My colleague spoke on the RT to the medics at Iqaluit so they knew what to expect. The passenger was stable.
All would have been uneventful and we would have off loaded the passengers, refuelled and been on our way, except on taxiing onto the ramp the ground crew misdirected the aircraft the the outer engine hit a refueling hydrant on the ramp leaving the aircraft (Lady Penelope - about 3 months old at the time!) grounded. Apparently, we nearly had to use the slides due to spilling JetA1 on the apron. We were made very welcome by the locals and accommodated in a closed curling rink (?) for 12 hours until Delta Airlines sent a Tristar to rescue us and fly us down to JFK to eventually connect with an AA flight to LAX the next day......it was a long, eventful journey which I would not want to repeat.
I believe this diversion cost VS several million pounds. The ground crew at Iqaluit took full responsibility and compensated VS. I believe as a direct result of this emergency VS invested in air-ground communications with a medical centre in Atlanta (?) for future such occurences.....a very good idea. The passenger was fine and may not have suffered a cardiac event at all ironically- just the effects of the reduced cabin pressure compromising his cardiac status!
On talking to the VS cabin crew on that 744 there were about 8 doctors. The odds are that in any 350 people there will be several doctors and hence there has never been a necessity to carry doctors specifically. Of course there will probably be nurses/paramedics as well. US doctors are often reluctant to volunteer due to worry about litigation (this was the case on our flight....about an hour into the emergency a cabin attendent asked if we wanted help as a US cardiologist had eventually come forward....by that time we were practically on final approach to Iqaluit so pretty unhelpful). In the UK our medical insurance will cover us for good samaritan acts anywhere in the world. I believe in France, doctors are obliged by law to volunteer in such situations.

I hope my experience has perhaps reduced the chance of doctors being called upon midflight (especially if flying VS) and of course will improve the care of ill passengers aboard. Airlines will certainly improve facilities if it ultimately saves them money.


User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
Reply 17, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3340 times:

Do you think its necessary to have a doctor on long haul flights

..and you think ticket prices are expensive now..!! That would drive up the cost of a ticket significantly, let alone open the airline up for liability. Due to the very low number of actual in flight medical emergencies, you stand a much better chance of already having a Doctor, Nurse or EMT / Paramedic onboard then you would paying the extra cost to have on standing by.



"It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
User currently offlineTcfc424 From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 517 posts, RR: 2
Reply 18, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 3313 times:

I don't think that having a separate Dr., RN, or EMT on a flight would be beneficial, however I do not see why there shouldn't be a cabin crew member trained to at least EMT on the long-haul flights. No disrespect to the doctors and physicians on this board, but unless they are an ER doctor or have had extensive training in ER, they are not always as useful as a pre-hospital car provider, usually EMT's (paramedics) and RN's. An EMT would be well equipped to manage basic life support services in the air and in a pre-hospital environment, and is more inclined to correctly gauge the patients condition and the necessity to divert...almost all EMS systems have a method for classifying the severity of patients...level I, Level II, Level III...Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta...etc.

The problem with relying on PAX doctors is 1) you may have doctors, but they could be chemists, educators, podiatrists, etc. 2) they may be reluctant to expose themselves to liability and 3) most would rather leave the situation to those who know best how to handle the situation...I.e. ER Docs and prehospital care providers.

In short, perhaps seeing an EMT or RN as a dedicated cabin crew member to flights flying under ETOP 180 restrictions or even 120 restrictions may not be such a bad idea. Most airlines have an international and a domestic flight crew and thus only a small amount of personnel would need training to become EMT's.

Mike S. in AUS


User currently offlineJeffrySkY From Singapore, joined Feb 2004, 178 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3302 times:

a tension pneumothorax is when air is trapped within the pleural envelope surrounding the lung , restricting lung expansion. it's a standard emergency procedure to make an incision between the 4th/5th ribs if that happens.

in the HKG incident, i also recall a steak knife being used , and brandy was used to sterilise the incision site. the air was allowed to bubble out into a bottle of water ; the doctor was really worried to see blood bubbling out instead of air bubbles. fortunately for him, it was successful and the pneumothorax subsided.

Quoting UA777222 (Reply 1):

.. and we'll see whether you will be in that position to comment as such , when you are stricken with a tension pneumothorax at 33,000 ft and gasping for every breath of oxygen you can get.


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13555 posts, RR: 62
Reply 20, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3292 times:
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.. and we'll see whether you will be in that position to comment as such , when you are stricken with a tension pneumothorax at 33,000 ft and gasping for every breath of oxygen you can get.



So tell me Jeffry, are you willing to pay an extra $25.00 per roundtrip to ensure there's a doctor onboard in the event that something MIGHT happen to him, then?

And are you also willing to volunteer that EVERYONE cough up this extra money as well on each and every ticket they purchase, too?

Mighty big of you to make decisions for everyone....  sarcastic 

[Edited 2005-03-10 16:58:00]


"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 21, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3273 times:



Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 20):
tell me Jeffry, are you willing to pay an extra $25.00 per roundtrip to ensure there's a doctor onboard in the event that something MIGHT happen to him, then?

...and that that Doctor MIGHT be able to do something...

This is why I said in reply #2 that it just isn't a financially viable prospect at the moment, especially with FAs that have some medical training and can contact a doctor on the ground if the need arrises

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineCha747 From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 785 posts, RR: 6
Reply 22, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 3261 times:

Fascinating thread...a few comments:

1. Commercial airplanes should have access to some sort of ground-based medical command (most airlines do). F/A's who are trained in first aid should be able to use the onboard equipment in conjunction with medical command. If a physician (or EMT, paramedic, nurse, PA, or CRNP) is onboard, that's a plus but shouldn't be necessary. If the patient suddenly becomes so sick that they need critical care, the chances of a successful rescucitation decrease with every minute that they're not in a critical care setting (Emergency Department or Intensive Care Unit).

2. Back when F/A's were RN's, there were only 3-4 drugs to treat hypertension...currently we have several hundred. The point is that the scope of a nurse's job has changed over the years and they really need to know a lot more than before. IMO, it would be a poor allocation of resources to require F/A's to be nurses.

3. People seem to have a notion that a defibrillator (or AED...there are a million names for it) can treat a heart attack. Here's the deal...a defibrillator can shock the heart out of an abnormal rhythm, period end of story. Some heart attacks can cause an abnormal rhythm but an abnormal rhythm (arrythmia) can develop for a variety of reasons (a blood clot in the lungs, an electrolyte imbalance, from prescription or illegal drugs, etc). In addition, not all arrythmias are necessarily shockable...some respond better to medicines rather than electricity. So the point is, if somebody is having chest pain or becomes unresponsive on the plane, hook them up to the AED. Most new AED's will do all the work for you after that (shock the shockable rhythms) and get the plane on the ground.



You land a million planes safely, then you have one little mid-air and you never hear the end of it - Pushing Tin
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12242 posts, RR: 35
Reply 23, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3222 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

This must be one of the most sensible threads on here in a while. Kudos to RootsAir for breaking the monotony of A vs B, NW DC9, AF dirty planes, the worst one yet: "Where is Peter Max today?", and the list goes on and on...


911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineKITH From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 378 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (9 years 5 months 3 weeks 3 days 10 hours ago) and read 3209 times:

My uncle is a Dr. and has had three or four medical emergency's over the ladt four years on flights JFK-LHR/JFK-AMS etc. Usually its nothing serious. Funny, when the F/A calls for Doctor on the JFK-AMS on KLM none raised their hands, 2nd time, none did, third time he did and he helped the woman so they didn't have to divert. KLM gave him a two first class tickets because of this! Not bad compensation for some gas! Less than having to divert/refuel though-Matt in KITH

25 Post contains links and images EA CO AS : Don't forget, many airlines (over 70, IIRC) contract with PHX-based MedAire, a company whose MedLink services does air-to-ground patches directly betw
26 LTBEWR : Poster KITH noted that his Uncle whom is a Medical Doctor and assited an ill pax was compensated with free flight tickets for his assitance. Is this a
27 JeffrySkY : I see no relevance of your statement to my post. The point i am making in reference to UA777222 is that in light of a medical emergency mid-flight, y
28 KhenleyDIA : 1. Coming from an EMS background, the only thing someone would do on a plane that would be worth while, cutting them open, would be a crich. In other
29 JeffrySkY : it's true that some doctors may not be prepared to handle such an emergency with such limited equipment onboard. hence, it's really many thanks to the
30 EA CO AS : Sorry Jeffry - I misinterpreted your post. My apologies.
31 TimRees : Ahh...I remember being a medical student...we thought everything just ran like clockwork and we'd all be able to save the world! In the real world mos
32 Post contains images Mrniji : Yeah, but my dad always travels Surname/FIrstname Dr., though he is NOT a medical doctor but has his dortrade (phD) in engineering.. he was never req
33 Ckfred : A friend of mine was the F/O on an AA 767 flight from SFO to ORD. Over Nevada, a passenger noticed that the woman next to him had passed out. So, here
34 Mrniji : ckfred, outstanding description! Super Maybe the question is a little inappropriate, but who pays for the following costs of the diversion?
35 Cha747 : Hi TimRees - welcome to my respected users list. You hit the nail on the head. I'm a physician in a tertiary care Emergency Department and we have pa
36 TimRees : Cha747.. Thanks for the complement... I really hope the flights I fly on are medical emergency free following my limited experiences. Following the di
37 UA777222 : Too add to the already correct ideas, what are you going to do when the flight is overbooked and they need to remove you from your flight in order to
38 Post contains images Tavong : In a Medical point of view - There aren't studies that demostrate that the survival chance is different if you have a permanent doctor on board than i
39 Avek00 : At the end of the day, many airborne medical emergenices can be averted altogether if people just used some brain power in determining whether they ar
40 Manu : That is well within the "golden hour" for hospital treatment. Providing O2 and starting to treat the individual on the fight as soon as something was
41 Post contains links and images Cha747 : Hey Gus, Good to hear you chime-in on this as well. Perhaps if an airline let a few of us "ride-along" we could get a case-series going for the NEJM o
42 Post contains images Tavong : HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA, you make my day Cha D I really can't imagine doing that at 39.000 feet, on other hands i really can't imagine while you're intu
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