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Airline CEO Compensation  
User currently offlineFA4UA From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 812 posts, RR: 20
Posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2908 times:

According to Forbes.com:

UA's CEO Glenn Tilton made $1.2 million in compensation last year
CO's CEO Larry Kellner made $790,562
AA's CEO Gerald Arpey made $686,285
WN's CEO Gary Kelly made $627,706
NW's CEO Douglas Steenland made $523,577
DL's CEO Gerald Grinstein made $382,207

This teaches me a few things:
1. if your name is Gerald, you're chances of being an airline CEO is better
2. if you lead your airline through gut wrenching cutbacks and salary set backs for everyone you will still make lots of money.
3. if your airline (WN) made money and you are virtually a miracle worker, you will be paid an average CEO salary

I do hope HR courses in our nation's universities don't use these models for compensation theory.

FA4UA

sources:
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...k_451.html?partner=yahoo&id=C03905
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...k_476.html?partner=yahoo&id=C01130
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...k_476.html?partner=yahoo&id=C09771
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...k_476.html?partner=yahoo&id=C00453
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...k_476.html?partner=yahoo&id=C00669
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...k_476.html?partner=yahoo&id=C02559


The debate continues... Starwood or Hyatt... which is better
47 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11630 posts, RR: 61
Reply 1, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2904 times:

Quoting FA4UA (Thread starter):
AA's CEO Gerald Arpey made $686,285

It's actually Gerard Arpey.


User currently offlineRedFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4327 posts, RR: 28
Reply 2, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2902 times:

Good post. There was a thread about a month back that talked about Tilton's salary. There were some folks who defended it. Given where his airline is and where it's NOT going (e.g., out of bankruptcy) as well as the sacrifices he's put his employees through, he should be shown the door.

If nothing else then to reflect the fact that he's not leading by example nor garnering the respect he should be to lead effectively.



My other home is a Piper Cherokee 180C
User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11630 posts, RR: 61
Reply 3, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2887 times:

Considering how far AA has come, I don't think that Gerard Arpey's compensation (his salary is actually $513,700, the rest is stock options) is competely unwarranted.

In fact, the 1.5% raise that all AA employees (including Arpey) will get is the first raise that Gerard Arpey has seen in several years. In 2003, his salary dropped by 14 percent even though he was promoted to CEO. In 2004, he turned down a 22% raise the board offered him when he became Chairman.


User currently offlineFA4UA From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 812 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2883 times:

EXACTLY my feelings RedFlyer! I totally understand we need to pay CEO's a good salary to retain talent and attract the best, however if a CEO is preaching "staying United" and teamwork, while cutting everybody's salary's and still drawing in this much... How can any of us believe his "teamwork" pleas?

oooops on the spelling of Gerard!

FA4UA



The debate continues... Starwood or Hyatt... which is better
User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 84
Reply 5, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 2876 times:

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 2):
Given where his airline is and where it's NOT going (e.g., out of bankruptcy) as well as the sacrifices he's put his employees through, he should be shown the door.

And replaced with who? Nobody is stupid enough to sign up for that dead-end gig.

N


User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11630 posts, RR: 61
Reply 6, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2870 times:

Quoting FA4UA (Reply 4):
I totally understand we need to pay CEO's a good salary to retain talent and attract the best, however if a CEO is preaching "staying United" and teamwork, while cutting everybody's salary's and still drawing in this much... How can any of us believe his "teamwork" please?

That is exactly right. I find it egregious that while United is in bankruptcy, losing hundreds of millions per quarter, asking for concession after concession from its workers, and terminating their pension plans, the CEO is making more than any other airline CEO. If that is what United needs to do to retain Tilton, then maybe Tilton is not the kind of CEO they need to retain.


User currently offlineRedFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4327 posts, RR: 28
Reply 7, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2849 times:

Quoting Gigneil (Reply 5):
And replaced with who? Nobody is stupid enough to sign up for that dead-end gig.

Oh, I would think there are enough egos on A.Net who think they know it all and who would be stupid enough to sign up for that "dead-end gig" -- and for 1/10 his salary.  duck 



My other home is a Piper Cherokee 180C
User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25369 posts, RR: 49
Reply 8, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2829 times:

Quoting Commavia (Reply 6):
I find it egregious that while United is in bankruptcy, losing hundreds of millions per quarter, asking for concession after concession from its workers, and terminating their pension plans, the CEO is making more than any other airline CEO. If that is what United needs to do to retain Tilton, then maybe Tilton is not the kind of CEO they need to retain.

Tilton prior to United was at one of America's largest companies, Texaco. Clearly Tilton did not come to United to do charity work for pennies on the dollar and must be compensated accordignly. Tilton just like front line employees has taken multiple pay cuts since joining, and forgone additional compensation perks which were part of his employment package. His 2004 bonuses, were based exactly the same ones all employees received for reaching performance goals while in bankruptcy.

Personally I do not feel any of the above CEO are particuarly overpaid, in fact I considering them underpaid. These are all CEO's responsible for large Fortune-200 companies with tens of thousands of employees, shareholders, and customers. To think they would settle for much less then peers in other industries a falicy.

Lastly, companies on shaky finances must often up executive compensation during tough periods to ensure the company does not suffer multiple departures from its executive ranks. Retention and performance incentive programs are very valuable tools. One of the worst possible things to happen to a company like United while in bankruptcy is to loose several key executives. This would not only cause great concern amongst financial lenders, vendors, customers but also stop the clock on any progress being made until a new team can get in place and try to figure out what might be going on. Any such lost time might be a fatal move.

If you disagree with any of these views, do not blame the CEO's instead blame the board of directors, and free enterprise system we have in this country.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11630 posts, RR: 61
Reply 9, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2822 times:

Laxintl -- I understand everything you are saying and agree that not only are airline CEOs underpaid for other companies in other industries, but that sometimes financially weak airlines have to retain top management with financial incentives. Still, in spite of all that, I just think it is a bit sad that while United's employees are losing pay, benefits and, most devastating, their pensions, their CEO is getting paid over twice what his counterpart (Arpey) at a larger airline (AA) is making.

User currently offlineAa777jr From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 2806 times:

what the hell is the crapiest (financially) airline CEO getting the biggest pay out for? That guy should use his 1.2 million and pay lawyers at UA trying to dig them out of their bankruptcy hole. They still haven't shown signs of an exit strategy at UA.

Quoting Laxintl (Reply 8):
companies on shaky finances must often up executive compensation during tough periods to ensure the company does not suffer multiple departures from its executive ranks

E N R O N  covereyes 


User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2438 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2798 times:

That list also shows that Warren Buffett of Berkshire Hathaway made $100,000.
And Steven Jobs of Apple Computers made $0.
http://www.forbes.com/static/execpay...ry2=&passKeyword=&resultsStart=476



Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineRogerThat From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 566 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2783 times:

The CEO job doesn't have much job security. Have any of these guys been CEO for more than 5 years? Arpey has been with AA for 20 plus, but CEO since only 2003. Does Titlon have the most time in the CEO chair?

You got to make hay while the sun shines.


User currently offlineSupa7E7 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2772 times:

These paychecks are crazy low!

Of the Forbes 500, look at the list of executive compensation. On the LAST page, #475-500, you'll find all these airline guys. No CEO works in the airline business for the money. ZERO, NONE. They work there because they love it. They love airlines so much they're wacko. They are being underpaid by a factor of 10 compared to equal jobs in related industries.

The going rate for a Fortune 500 CEO is about 2-5 million these days. That's an average of hundreds of firms. If you think 500k is a lot for a job like that, you are nuts.


User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11630 posts, RR: 61
Reply 14, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2768 times:

Quoting Supa7E7 (Reply 13):
Of the Forbes 500, look at the list of executive compensation. On the LAST page, #475-500, you'll find all these airline guys. No CEO works in the airline business for the money. ZERO, NONE. They work there because they love it. They love airlines so much they're wacko. They are being underpaid by a factor of 10 compared to equal jobs in related industries.

Very true.


User currently offlineCorey07850 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2527 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2734 times:

Anyone know what ol' Gordo was making before he left CO? I bet it tops them all

User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25369 posts, RR: 49
Reply 16, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2732 times:

When Tilton was lured over from Texaco in 2002, he was given a $13.6 million compensation package that included monies to make up forfeited future compensation and a pension at Texaco.

His compensation included a yearly $1.9million base salary including any performance bonuses. Within 10 weeks of him arriving at United, he voluntarily took a 11% paycut, and since has continued to take additional cuts along with the rank an file.

Thus his 2004 pay of $1.2 million is only a fraction (63%) of the pay he signed for when the took the job.

If anything I could probably state, Tilton is more interested in United as a personal challenge then for compensation. Same with the rest of the industries CEO's. They could easily earn more money working in different fields. Look at the former executives whom have moved on, and ended up in the fast food industry and a health care organization.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 2721 times:

Quoting FA4UA (Thread starter):
This teaches me a few things:
1. if your name is Gerald, you're chances of being an airline CEO is better

While not a CEO anymore, Gerald Greenwald did all right when he was CEO at UA. He did a great job...too bad he was replaced by a loser like Jim Goodwin.

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 2):
Given where his airline is and where it's NOT going (e.g., out of bankruptcy) as well as the sacrifices he's put his employees through, he should be shown the door.

Do you know this for a fact, or is it an assumption on your part? Think of how far UA has come in 2 years...there was a lot of speculation that UA wouldn't emerge, but that is gone now. Now that the pension issue is closer to being "resolved" (though I highly disagree with it) they're that much closer now to being able to emerge and secure exit financing to do so.

Quoting Aa777jr (Reply 10):
They still haven't shown signs of an exit strategy at UA

There is an exit strategy, and a business plan. Parts of it have been executed already, and the rest is yet to come. Just because it isn't public yet (for proprietary/competitive reasons) doesn't mean there isn't one.


User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25369 posts, RR: 49
Reply 18, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2689 times:

Quoting Corey07850 (Reply 15):
Anyone know what ol' Gordo was making before he left CO? I bet it tops them all

according to
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/business/3149144

Gordo got $27 million when he left in December 2004.

Some highlights..

"Former Continental Airlines CEO Gordon Bethune got more than $27 million when he retired on Dec. 30, a regulatory filing Friday shows."

"The payout was recommended by Continental's human resources committee, according to the filing."

"When Bethune retired, his base salary was $1.04 million."

"Bethune's total retirement package included $22 million agreed to the April before he retired and $5.1 million promised about the time Northwest Airlines and its affiliates made a major investment in Continental in 1998."

"Additionally, he received a $410,000 payment related to the incentive program."

"Continental's filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission also showed that the carrier's top executives took pay cuts as Continental was trying to win wage and benefit concessions from employees."

"Chairman and CEO Larry Kellner's annual salary this year is $712,500, down from $950,000. President Jeff Smisek's salary is $576,000, down from $720,000."



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineRedFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4327 posts, RR: 28
Reply 19, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2679 times:

Quoting StevenUhl777 (Reply 17):
Do you know this for a fact, or is it an assumption on your part?

I'm not sure what your saying in response to my comment. I do know for a fact that UA is in bankruptcy. I do know for a fact that there is no date set for their emergence from bankruptcy. I do know for a fact that they have recently requested another extension for emergence from bankruptcy. I do know for a fact that Tilton is paid more than airline CEOs whose companies are showing a profit. I do know for a fact that Tilton's compensation last fiscal year included a bonus -- a bonus that he took after he asked his employees to make extensions. I do know for a fact that that kind of conduct has made him a pariah within his own company.

Are there any other facts you'd like to know?

Quoting StevenUhl777 (Reply 17):
Think of how far UA has come in 2 years...there was a lot of speculation that UA wouldn't emerge, but that is gone now.

How far have they come in 2 years? They are still in bankruptcy last time I checked and will continue to be so, as evidenced by their most recent pleading for a court extension. Where is your information coming from that says all the speculation regarding their ability to emerge from bankruptcy is "gone now"?

Quoting StevenUhl777 (Reply 17):
Just because it isn't public yet (for proprietary/competitive reasons) doesn't mean there isn't one.

I didn't realize being in bankruptcy was considered proprietary or imbued an entity with competitive rights and advantages. Perhaps if Tilton & Co. shared some of these "proprietary" plans with their debtors, they might actually be able to emerge from bankruptcy and get on with doing what they should be doing -- making money. Which they are not.



My other home is a Piper Cherokee 180C
User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3350 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2647 times:

Quoting FA4UA (Thread starter):
2. if you lead your airline through gut wrenching cutbacks and salary set backs for everyone you will still make lots of money.

Gate agents, ticket agents, pilots, mechanic flight attendants, reservation agents and ramp agents can be replaced very easily. It is much harder to find a CEO than it is to find any other employee.

Quoting Aa777jr (Reply 10):
what the hell is the crapiest (financially) airline CEO getting the biggest pay out for? That guy should use his 1.2 million and pay lawyers at UA trying to dig them out of their bankruptcy hole. They still haven't shown signs of an exit strategy at UA.

Ok, so you think the CEO making $1.2 million is bad. Imagine what the CEO making $400,000 would do to the place.

AAndrew


User currently offlineRedFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4327 posts, RR: 28
Reply 21, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2639 times:

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 20):
Ok, so you think the CEO making $1.2 million is bad. Imagine what the CEO making $400,000 would do to the place.

Ummm...I didn't realize there was a direct correlation between salary and competency.

Using that analogy, Bernie Ebbers should not be facing the rest of his life in prison.

Regards



My other home is a Piper Cherokee 180C
User currently offlineAa757first From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 3350 posts, RR: 7
Reply 22, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2624 times:

Last year, United lost $1.7 billion dollars. In the same year, Schering-Plough lost $947 million and AT&T lost $6.4.

Schering-Plough CEO - $8.91 million dollars (total compensation)
AT&T CEO - $11.7 million dollars (T/C)

As you can see, a companies financial performance does not tie into their CEO's compensation.

AAndrew


User currently offlineRedFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 4327 posts, RR: 28
Reply 23, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 2609 times:

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 22):
As you can see, a companies financial performance does not tie into their CEO's compensation.

Agreed. And for the most part, I don't have an issue with CEO's pulling down the big bucks when in fact their companies might be losing money.

However, I do have an issue with a CEO who harps endlessly about the need for his/her employees to give concessions and make financially oppressive sacrifices - only to turn around and personally take a hefty bonus payment.

Moreover, last time I checked, companies and their executive salaries are usually calculated and compared based on industry (e.g., airline, telecom, manufacturing, etc.) standards. I don't think the analysis with AT&T and Schering-Plough is necessarily the best analogy for Tilton.

The bottom line: a CEO is a leader. As a leader he has an obligation to set the example and the tone. Why do you think Boeing whacked Stonecipher? Besides many of the different reasons given on here, one of the reasons was he did not set an example by sending sexually lurid emails on the corporate email system. Shows very bad judgment on his part. I think it does on Tilton's as well (although, obviously, not of the same gravity).

Best regards



My other home is a Piper Cherokee 180C
User currently offlineStevenUhl777 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (9 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 2587 times:

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 19):
I'm not sure what your saying in response to my comment.

You said:

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 2):
Given where his airline is and where it's NOT going (e.g., out of bankruptcy)

True...UAL has seen much better days than they have in the last two years. You're making the assumption that they won't come out of bankruptcy at all. My question is how do you know this for sure? Are you basing that solely on monthly/quarterly losses?

The bottom line here is that neither you or me or anyone else on here has access to the information the executives at UAL do. Why would UA make it's exit strategy and business plan known now, if they're not planning to emerge until later this year? Why give their competitors time to examine it and change their business plan to respond to it?

United creditor banks haven't opposed the many extensions that UAL has received. In fact, they have agreed to modifications to the agreements which gives UA some leeway to react to factors outside their control like fuel prices. In fact, creditors apparently have enough faith in UAL senior management to allow them to put fuel hedges in place, currently at 11%.

I could go on and on, but I've already done that in numerous other posts too many times already. Glenn Tilton wasn't hired in Sept. 2002 to be f-ing Santa Claus and to hold everyone's hands. He was hired to restructure UAL into a profit-making enterprise by removing the elements of the company which brought it to the Ch. 11 filing. Tilton has been through this before, with ChevronTexaco. Ch. 11 sucks, and in order to ensure that there isn't a second filing (which is usually fatal to a company) he is making the very tough decisions now to ensure the long-term survival of United. There's a lot broken with that company, and a lot has to be fixed, and it's not something that happens overnight, or within a year. Jim Goodwin could never have led UA this far, neither could Dick Ferris. Steve Wolf would have sold/merged it a year ago. Tilton and Brace, on the other hand, want to see United survive and prosper, just like the unions that supported the hiring of Tilton in 2002. They have long forgotten that now. Unfortunately, they have to make difficult decisions and reverse the downward spiral that UA was in even before 9/11. Three months (maybe not even that long) after UA emerges, I will be stunned if Tilton and Brace are still at UAL. Many other executives who report to them will also likely depart Elk Grove Township as well. Whoever ultimately does take control of the new company will look to bring in their own proven people to run UAL. Who that will be, I don't know.

Quoting RedFlyer (Reply 19):
How far have they come in 2 years? They are still in bankruptcy last time I checked and will continue to be so, as evidenced by their most recent pleading for a court extension. Where is your information coming from that says all the speculation regarding their ability to emerge from bankruptcy is "gone now"?

Just how long do you think it takes to restructure a company the size of UAL? A month? Two maybe? Six? US only took a year the first time, and had no choice but to emerge the first time on the date they did. But...the company didn't cut enough to survive outside Ch. 11, and thus had to refile. Tilton and Brace are doing the right thing by making certain that everything that can be cut is cut, to ensure that UAL won't have to refile for Ch. 11 6 months to a year later.

When UA first filed for Ch. 11, industry analysts estimated there was about a 50% chance UA could file Ch. 7. As the restructuring took place, and those closely watching UA saw the progress, they dramatically lowered the chance of a Ch. 7 filing to below 10%. Think about all that has happened in the industry since the filing, especially with fuel prices...UAL didn't have any control over that (and publicly opposed the Iraq war, knowing damn well what fuel prices would do, and ended being right) and have had to constantly adjust and make changes to offset the rising cost of fuel. And guess what? UA is still flying...and will continue to do so, and WILL reemerge.

[Edited 2005-04-26 05:52:44]

[Edited 2005-04-26 05:54:48]

25 RedFlyer : You win. I can't argue with all you wrote. (And you wrote a lot.) Actually, I could but I have a life outside of A.Net so I'll let it ride for now. M
26 CRJCA : Did anyone notice Mesa Airlines CEO Jonathan Ornstein made 4.8 million?
27 PSU.DTW.SCE : I'm pretty sure the Mesaba Holding's CEO Paul Foley makes pretty close to what Steeland is making over at NWA. You would think there would be a signif
28 FA4UA : LAXINTL welcome to my respected users list. You always seem to have well thought out comments on this forum. Great discussion folks... it has broadene
29 Coa764 : It amazes me that people are so concerned with what a CEO makes that they will take the time to research the numbers. Two words WHO CARES! I mean real
30 CTHEWORLD : LXINTL, Agreed! One item you didn't note, Tilton took a cut over his originally negotiated salary, all other employees took a cut over their originall
31 Post contains images FA4UA : regarding post 29... I think we have a teenager in here!
32 Post contains images OttoPylit : HILARIOUS!!! Well, since everyone else decided to argue and bicker, I will be the first to say that I thought FA4UA made some very good(and f*cking f
33 Coa764 : Nope I just used a little cliché sarcasm when filling out my profile. But it does makes sense that a Flight Attendant is the one who started this th
34 FA4UA : Where's the love?? Just so that we're all on the same page, I chose this job, I'm not stuck in it. I started this thread to point out what the leader
35 N844AA : Interesting perspective. It must be difficult for the executive compensation committee of a troubled airline to strike a balance between recruting to
36 NKP S2 : What is he worth if he's overseeing a like amount in losses? Does the market bear negative numbers? No? I didn't think so. Gotta love double standard
37 Coa764 : And what is the need to do that then, really ... I mean why would anyone care what these people make, why would you care enough to look up the inform
38 Post contains images N844AA : Sorry, I had veered off into musing on the state of CEO compensation in general. I'm not aware of any airlines posting billion dollar profits, at lea
39 N844AA : Well, I don't mean to speak for anyone else, but I thought it was interesting. Particularly the correlation (or lack thereof) between executive compe
40 Coa764 : There is is again, I hear this all the time! If I were a CEO I world take a pay cut too... Would you, really.... would you cut your salary? Remember
41 Post contains images NKP S2 : Musing is fine ( to the degree it doesn't attempt to distort the argument beyond a reasonable comparision ) but then again, the logic presented certa
42 Post contains images N844AA : Odd that you'd seize upon this, since I thought I qualified myself pretty well, but let me try again. No, I have no idea if I'd cut my salary. I pers
43 Post contains images N844AA : Oh, no, I don't think it is at all. I'm just saying that he might be worth it, in the sense that it is theoretically possible that it could conceivab
44 Coa764 : And again my question is why do you care? How is this little tidbit of knowledge going to improve your status in life? Is the world going to be a bet
45 RogerThat : I would say that makes the FAs overpaid not the CEO. There are more applicants than incumbents. There is no shortage of people willing to do the job.
46 N844AA : Reasonable executive compensation is an example of good corporate governance. An excessive salary is a poor use of resources and an inadequate salary
47 FA4UA : If this subject frustrates you so much then why participate in the discussion? Just pointing out a "hot button" issue within this business that a lot
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