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Non-stop Service US To India  
User currently offlineJimbobjoe From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 661 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 8 months 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 5123 times:

Hello all,

Having a bit of a discussion over here...my friends claims that there are non-stop flights between the US an India. However, all I find is that CO has the announced EWR-DEL services as of December 31 and that United had planned some services from ORD before 9/11.

I'm just making sure this is indeed the case.

Also, is the EWR-DEL the 3rd longest in the world? Can one of COs 777s do EWR-BOM?

Thanks

12 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMoose1226 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 250 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (9 years 8 months 1 day ago) and read 5085 times:

I don't believe that there are any existing services nonstop between the US and India. There are several that may pop up in the near future, however, especially with AI's selection of the 772LR.

I think ETOPS might be a problem over the Himalaylas, though. In the event of a depressurisation, terrain would prevent the aircraft from descending to a safe altitude, or at least that's how I understand it.


User currently offlineTWA902fly From United States of America, joined Dec 1999, 3129 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (9 years 8 months 1 day ago) and read 5084 times:

maybe "USA" as in "North America" and YYZ-DEL on Air Canada?

'902



life wasn't worth the balance, or the crumpled paper it was written on
User currently offlineJcavinato From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 520 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (9 years 8 months 1 day ago) and read 5037 times:

The OAG only shows an Air Canada 343 doing a non-stop Toronto-Delhi (7270 miles) as the only North America - India at the moment. Several one and two stops, though.

ETOPS: A new client of mine is a big aerospace product producer. At an informal lunch I asked someone what ETOPS stood for. The answer: Engines Turning Otherwise Passengers Swimming.

Bit of grim humor, there.


User currently offlineTexdravid From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1365 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (9 years 8 months 20 hours ago) and read 4891 times:

Quoting Jimbobjoe (Thread starter):
Having a bit of a discussion over here...my friends claims that there are non-stop flights between the US an India. However, all I find is that CO has the announced EWR-DEL services as of December 31 and that United had planned some services from ORD before 9/11.

United planned, but never flew ORD-DEL.
Canada 3000 planned, but never flew YYZ-DEL.

AC flies YYZ-DEL with A343/345. With the 343, sometimes a technical stop in Europe is required. Flight time is 15-16 hours. Favorite flight of the Punjabi/U.P. community in Toronto.

CO's future EWR-DEL flight will be the first U.S. nonstop to India.
CO 772-ER will not have the range with any significant payload to BOM.
If and when they order the 772LR, then they will.



Tort reform now. Throw lawyers in jail later.
User currently offlineTKMCE From India, joined May 2002, 841 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (9 years 8 months 20 hours ago) and read 4880 times:

Quoting Texdravid (Reply 4):
Canada 3000 planned, but never flew YYZ-DEL

NO- they flew but very briefly before they went bust.
I am sure about this.


User currently offlineTKMCE From India, joined May 2002, 841 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 8 months 20 hours ago) and read 4872 times:

Here is a newslink on the inaugral flight of Canada 3000

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2001/20011011/biz.htm#2


User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 8 months 20 hours ago) and read 4880 times:

Quoting Texdravid (Reply 4):
Canada 3000 planned, but never flew YYZ-DEL.

Canada 3000 operated both DEL-YYZ (2x weekly) and DEL-YVR (1x weekly) flights between October 9, 2001 and November 8, 2001.


User currently offline4xRuv From Israel, joined Dec 2003, 388 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (9 years 8 months 13 hours ago) and read 4736 times:

Quoting Texdravid (Reply 4):
CO's future EWR-DEL flight will be the first U.S. nonstop to India.
CO 772-ER will not have the range with any significant payload to BOM.
If and when they order the 772LR, then they will.

So what kind of AC will CO use?


User currently offlineAseem From India, joined Feb 2005, 2046 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (9 years 8 months 13 hours ago) and read 4695 times:

Quoting 4xRuv (Reply 8):
So what kind of AC will CO use?

B772ER for sure.

Quoting Texdravid (Reply 4):
AC flies YYZ-DEL with A343/345. With the 343, sometimes a technical stop in Europe is required. Flight time is 15-16 hours. Favorite flight of the Punjabi/U.P. community in Toronto.

I flew AC054/55 during Christmas hols. I had A343 on AC054, that is YYZ-DEL. It did not stop anywhere in Europe due to opening up of Russian Airspace and travel time was 13:30hrs exact. Even though it was a 4 engine aircraft, it still avoided Himalayas. Flew over Hindukush in Afghanistan, right above KBL and entered India near ATQ.
Return leg, that is AC055 from DEL-YYZ had A345, that flew directly over the pole and took 14hrs. Exited India south of ATQ, then right over ISB. Changed coursed up north right over KBL. Cut across Kazakhistan, Russia, northern tip of Scandinavia, north of Iceland and slicing whole breath of Greenland. Finally entering Canada somewhere between Labrador and Northern Quebec.
That's all I did during 27:30hrs of journey.
rgds
VT-ASJ

[Edited 2005-05-03 16:04:25]


ala re ala, VT-ALA ala
User currently offlineClrd4t8koff From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 225 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (9 years 8 months 11 hours ago) and read 4524 times:

I'm a little confused about the whole AC routing......AC 54 is an A343 YYZ-DEL, but on the return, AC 55 DEL-YYZ is an A345. So what happens to the A343 after it gets to DEL? Does it turn around and to go YVR or something and vice versa, where does the A345 come from that operates the return flight?

User currently offlineAseem From India, joined Feb 2005, 2046 posts, RR: 10
Reply 11, posted (9 years 8 months 11 hours ago) and read 4463 times:

Quoting Clrd4t8koff (Reply 10):

i didn't return by the same plane..stayed there for 3 weeks. Those days they were alternating between A343 and A345
rgds
VT-ASJ

[Edited 2005-05-03 18:22:34]


ala re ala, VT-ALA ala
User currently offlineCOEWR787 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 339 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (9 years 8 months 11 hours ago) and read 4449 times:

Quoting Moose1226 (Reply 1):
I think ETOPS might be a problem over the Himalaylas, though. In the event of a depressurisation, terrain would prevent the aircraft from descending to a safe altitude, or at least that's how I understand it.

One does not have to fly across the Himalayas on US to India nonstop. The commonly used corridor to/from the Indian subcontinent from the North-West runs roughly Islamabad - Kabul - Termez - Tashkent - Aralsk. Most flights into India from Russia travel along this route and then branch off in various directions. This route crosses the Hindu Kush (not the Himalayas or the Karakorams) between Kabul and Termez. The high altitudes of Hindu Kush are not big enough to be of concern viz-a-viz cabin dpressurization.

As for flying across Tibet, all aircrafts irrespective of the number of engines that they have suffer the "what to do upon accidental depressurization?" problem, since whether a plane suffers an accidental depressurization is independant of the number of engines that it has. The Tibetan plateau is large enough and high enough to make it impossible for an aircraft to descend to the stipulated altitude in the stipulated time in case of an accidental depressurization. Consequently, irrespective of the number of engines, planes flying across Tibet probably would be required to carry additional emergency Oxygen or some such.

Of course there are flights that originate or terminate in Tibet like the flight from/to Lhasa. I don't know if they do anything special regarding emergency Oxygen. However, having flown on the Lhasa - Kathmandu flight (right over Mt. Everest BTW) I found it somewhat amusing that after they closed the doors at Lhasa the plane was pressurized while taxiing to bring it to 7000' pressure. One could feel the added Oxygen  Smile. Lhasa airport is at somewhere between 11,000' and 12,000' or thereabout as I seem to recall.


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