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Smaller Overhead Bins Please  
User currently offlineJMV From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 241 posts, RR: 1
Posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4937 times:

Going against a trend, I'd prefer to see the airlines use smaller overhead bins. As I see it, smaller bins would resolve a number of problems...

1) Boarding would be faster because fewer people would carry on bags. No more waiting in the aisle for someone to try to fit an overstuffed rollaboard in the overhead, usually 10 to 20 seats forward of their own assigned seat. You also avoid the delays that come with finally having to check carry-on bags because they are too large or the overheads are full.

2) Deplanning would be faster, and safer. No more getting thumped on the head from either shifting luggage falling from bin when it is first opened, or someone not strong enough to remove the luggage without it falling on you. You also wouldn't have to wait while a fellow passenger tries to pry the same overstuffed rollaboard from the bin.

3) Flight attendants would have better attitudes knowing they wouldn't have to deal with surly passengers who insist on their steamer trunk should fit in the overhead bin. Also, they would be less likely to hurt themselves while trying lift a bag that could weigh half as much as they do.

4) Interiors of planes would be more open, less claustrophobic because the bins wouldn't be inches above your head and extend nearly to the middle of the cabin. Compare the interior of the B-707 with that of the B-757.


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5) Getting through security would be faster because there would be less bags to scan and search.

Certainly the airlines would have to do a better job of handling checked baggage, but if you ask me, I'd prefer smaller overhead bins.


Google begins where my brain ends! ©
38 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePetazulu From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 701 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4907 times:

Not me!

1. People would still bring the rolly bags as they would not know bins were smaller. Bins would be full even sooner and boarding would take even longer due to this.

2. How often have you actually been thumped on the head with anything heavy in an airplane? Is this a huge epedemic?

3. Bags should not weigh more than then half an FA. Enforce the existing rules. If you are not going to enforce the rules, the steamer trunk will be even LESS likely to fit than in a bigger bin.

4. Refitting aircraft o be mor eopen will be expensive as among other things, you would have to relocate the passenger service units (air masks, vents, tv's, lights, etc. Ouch!

5. You are right about security lines, but the TSA would cut staffing if people had fewer backs- so it is arguable that this would occur.

Overall, airlines should enforce their rules better before people board. You have to allow business pax the ability to bring a generous ammount on board as if I had to check my crap in for a one hour flight on an overnight trip, I would most likely not fly or take the airline with the more generous policy.


User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3874 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4902 times:

That's a really good point JMV...
and as well as this, I think the airlines should have tighter control over what people carry onboard... maybe a "let's see your carry on items" at checkin?


User currently offlineSsides From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 21
Reply 3, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4895 times:

Well, the market has spoken -- and I can guarantee you that larger overhead bins are a money-maker for airlines.

The reasoning is simple: airlines make their money off the road-warrior business traveler who flies 4-5 times a month at close to full fare. For these people, convenience and quickness are paramount. If you're away from your family a considerable amount, every minute counts. You don't want to wait for checked bags to arrive. If you have important business meetings, you want to be certain that your suit arrives and is not damaged. You don't want to risk putting important documents, etc., into the cargo hold. Therefore, you carry on.

If an airline decided to shrink its overhead bins, it would likely lose the business traveler to a competitor. No airline wants to do this. Add that to the fact that it's generally cheaper to have passengers carry their own bags rather than pay handlers, and it just makes sense to have larger bins.



"Lose" is not spelled with two o's!!!!
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8451 posts, RR: 10
Reply 4, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4884 times:
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Quoting Vasu (Reply 2):
maybe a "let's see your carry on items" at checkin?

They do that here. I have always been astounded when flying in the US at how much crap people bring as "carry on". If it's carry on, try and carry it, not wheel it!



After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21507 posts, RR: 60
Reply 5, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4853 times:

so you would have someone with a bad back or shoulder not be allowed a carry on because they have to wheel it? In america, we cater to the weak and feable  Wink


Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8451 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4838 times:
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Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 5):
so you would have someone with a bad back or shoulder not be allowed a carry on because they have to wheel it? In america, we cater to the weak and feable

But more to the totally inconsiderate.



After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25071 posts, RR: 46
Reply 7, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 4820 times:

I dont think people realize the true reason why airlines invest money in large overhead bins.
Its a very simple business decision.

Large overhead bins and more carry on bags =

Less checked baggage
Less ramp staff
Less ramp equipment
Less employee personal injury / disability claims
Less staff
Less lost baggage
More room for mail/cargo

= Less cost.

One major US airline a couple years refitted their entire fleet with larger bins to encourage passengers to carry on more of their luggage.

After 9/11 a US couple airlines even threatened to sue the TSA over proposed rules limiting carry on luggage size and amounts which were to be screened at the check points.

Larger bins are a relatively inexpensive, and quantifiable way to drive overall cost down at airlines.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlinePipoA380 From Switzerland, joined May 2005, 1594 posts, RR: 51
Reply 8, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4772 times:
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I think it's really not a so good idea. First of all, when traveling often, it's so much more convenient when people carry their carry-on, or roll-on, as long as you respect the rules of size.

Actually the examples you show there are all Boeing. Airbus has more space even with big overhead bins.


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Deplaning is long because people stand up before the plane even stops, and wait in the aisle all on top of the other to run out of the plane, the same way than they run into it to stand in line.

Boarding takes long because people don't know that there are 100 people waiting behind them when putting their handbag in the bin, to take out their book. People will still take out their walkman, book, make-up box or whatsoever... Making smaller bins won't change that. It doesn't occur often that it's someone who can't fit the bag up there: It's more because they can't read their seat number on the boarding card....

Flight Attendants should pay attention that people do not carry these over-sized packages all the way to the aircraft. Maybe some size controls at the security check would do the job or stronger controls at the check-in

And if the plane is late, it's not because of a bag, but because the same guy who can't read the number of his seat on the boarding pass was also unable to find the number of his gate in the terminal   

[Edited 2005-05-23 20:44:23]

[Edited 2005-05-23 20:45:08]


It's not about AIRBUS. it's not about BOEING. It's all about the beauty of FLYING.
User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4672 times:

Quoting PipoA380 (Reply 8):
Maybe some size controls at the security check would do the job or stronger controls at the check-in

Was tried in 2000 @ IAD by UA, but CO sued on the grounds of anti-competitive practices (Continental had a more traveler friendly carry on policy), as all of the x-ray machines were fitted with these baggage sizers. CO was successful in getting the sizers removed.

http://www.continental.com/vendors/d...234A5C8269802D297A887C&s=&i=PRNews
http://www.continental.com/vendors/d...234A5C8269802D297A887C&s=&i=PRNews

When I fly, I carry a carry on and the one personal bag I am allowed and try not to check any bags (This is because having worked on the ramp, I know what goes on in the bins. Not that this happends all the time, I just prefer to err on the side of caution and avoid overpacking to begin with.). Anything I may need during the flight is in my personal bag, which is put under the seat in front of me, and the carry on remains in the overhead bin for the duration of the flight.


User currently offlinePipoA380 From Switzerland, joined May 2005, 1594 posts, RR: 51
Reply 10, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 4656 times:
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Quoting Srbmod (Reply 9):

You link doesn't work Srbmod.

When I travel, I do it the same way than you, but people don't always think about separating what you need and what you don't during the flight... And if ever I have something in the overhead bin... I'll wait till passengers have finished boarding!



It's not about AIRBUS. it's not about BOEING. It's all about the beauty of FLYING.
User currently offlineByrdluvs747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 2358 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 4498 times:

I believe airports should start using those sizer cutouts they used to have on the xray machines. Those were great days. I could spend hours watching all the a-holes having to walk back to the ticket counter to check their luggage.


The 747: The hands who designed it were guided by god.
User currently onlineScottB From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 6745 posts, RR: 32
Reply 12, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 4339 times:

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
1) Boarding would be faster because fewer people would carry on bags. No more waiting in the aisle for someone to try to fit an overstuffed rollaboard in the overhead, usually 10 to 20 seats forward of their own assigned seat. You also avoid the delays that come with finally having to check carry-on bags because they are too large or the overheads are full.

Nope, what you'd see instead is people trying to carry aboard the largest possible bag (or larger) which would fit underneath the seat in front and spend two minutes in the aisle trying to wedge it in there. Then the flight attendants would spend half an hour checking all the bags which didn't really fit underneath the seats in front.

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
3) Flight attendants would have better attitudes knowing they wouldn't have to deal with surly passengers who insist on their steamer trunk should fit in the overhead bin.

So they'd be dealing with passengers who are ticked off because their carry-on which used to fit in the bins won't anymore. And they'd still be checking all the oversized bags which obstruct the floor in the rows.

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
4) Interiors of planes would be more open, less claustrophobic because the bins wouldn't be inches above your head and extend nearly to the middle of the cabin.

I prefer claustrophobic interiors to 30-45 minutes spent in claustrophobic baggage claim areas or baggage service offices due to lost/misconnected luggage.

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
5) Getting through security would be faster because there would be less bags to scan and search.

As others have said -- with less demand for screening capacity, there would be less screening capacity instead.

I guess you haven't been without your luggage for three to seven days, eh?


User currently offlineLH423 From Canada, joined Jul 1999, 6501 posts, RR: 54
Reply 13, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 4209 times:

Quoting Ssides (Reply 3):
The reasoning is simple: airlines make their money off the road-warrior business traveler who flies 4-5 times a month at close to full fare

Yes, but everywhere else in the world business travellers value their time just as much as their American counterparts. However, the airlines have spoken that safety must be paramount. Imagine if someone's 40 lbs bag falls on your head. That can cause a serious injury. European airlines have limited hand baggage to 6-12 kg. Business travellers work around that. So, the idea that someone as to wait 10 mins extra for their bag doesn't hold water. Their time isn't that important. If it was, they'd be flying their private jet.

LH423



« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
User currently offlineASMD80 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 126 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4192 times:

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
1) Boarding would be faster because fewer people would carry on bags. No more waiting in the aisle for someone to try to fit an overstuffed rollaboard in the overhead, usually 10 to 20 seats forward of their own assigned seat. You also avoid the delays that come with finally having to check carry-on bags because they are too large or the overheads are full.

Exactly! Multiple times, I have seen the plane slightly delayed (but able to take off on time) becuase there is no more room for rollaboards.

You can still experience smaller overhead bins on most MD80s  Wink



Some things are actually better at 30,000+ feet...
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4172 times:

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
Boarding would be faster because fewer people would carry on bags.

Never gonna happen - Tommy Tentpag and My VIP will continue to haul way too big and way too heavy bags onto airplanes with way too small bins and then stand there perplexed because they don't fit . . . oh, did I mention they'd have at least two bags each?

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
You also avoid the delays that come with finally having to check carry-on bags because they are too large or the overheads are full.

Nope, see my response above. In fact, would delay departure because now those idiots have to send their bag back into the jetway to be checked to whereever . . .

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
) Flight attendants would have better attitudes knowing they wouldn't have to deal with surly passengers who insist on their steamer trunk should fit in the overhead bin. Also, they would be less likely to hurt themselves while trying lift a bag that could weigh half as much as they do.

Agree - F/As shouldn't be doing this anyway unless the passenger is unable - by that I mean, old, infirm, a kid, etc . . . . healthy folks should pack and move their own crap.....kitchen sink included.

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
Interiors of planes would be more open, less claustrophobic because the bins wouldn't be inches above your head and extend nearly to the middle of the cabin.

Been on a 777 lately? Pretty open if you ask me . . . the way those bins glide into the ceiling, pretty nice. 767 the same way . . .

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
Getting through security would be faster because there would be less bags to scan and search.

Getting through security will never be faster until we replace the current TSA idiots with some common sense system. . . . shoes off, shoes on, lighters no, matches no, wait, wait, matches yes, lighters (never filled) yes, wait, no, wait . . . .  crazy 

Bottom line - if the carriers would simply enforce the rules they already have in place about what can and cannot be carried aboard, half the problem would be solved.


User currently offlineType-Rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 4976 posts, RR: 19
Reply 16, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4137 times:

I have a solution that would cure this problem once and for all.

When the plane is taxiing from the runway to the terminal, the F/A simply makes this announcement:

"When the aircraft comes to a complete stop at the gate, would all passengers who are carrying rolling suitcases, steamer trunks, kitchen sinks, and shower stalls please remain seated until those who have limited carry on luggage have departed the aircraft. This is so that we may provide those who have large carry ons ample manuvering room and time to remove their oversized luggage". Thank you for your cooperation!

That's ONE announcement I would love to hear!



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineFlyboy7974 From United States of America, joined Jan 2003, 1540 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4128 times:

how about no overhead bins, if i started an airline, it wouldnt have overhead bins, screw that, do you see what people bring on. and to all you business people, one bag to bring doesnt include your rollaway, your computer bag, your handbag, then your family goods and everything else you are too impatience to wait for at the end of your flight. flying home for my mother's funeral i laughed in march, a b737 from phx to bur in first on hp, i was last to board, so space was taken, my bag was checked and then missed the flight, points against hp as i was the only not in my suit, but when at the gate in burbank upon arrival, everybody else in first had 3/4 bags, computer pouches, rollaways. give me a break. when the f/a heard, she said she would have offered the space behind row 2 to me, but she didnt know. well she shouldnt have to if all other 7 first pax brought on more then 2-3 bags. security lines would also change, hey people, here's a hint, if it doesnt fit into the trunk of your car, hey dummy, dont try to carry it on. if fedex or ups deny you, dont try to carry it on, it's called a carry on, not your whole life moving coast to coast, or your whole business plan for a meeting not only in your seat, but half of mine, check it!!!!

User currently offlineJonathan L From United States of America, joined May 2001, 171 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4082 times:

The size of the overhead bins are fine, but people just need to use more common sense. Don't put more in your carry-on than you can lift up into the bins. I've given up putting my carry-on knapsack into the overhead bin since I don't feel like having it crushed by a 100lb beast on rollers that always seems to seek out my poor little bag.

I even had an Air Wisconsin employee telling me to bring both of my bags onto the aircraft as carry-ons when I flew with them last week. The last thing I wanted was to be running around ORD for a couple of hours with two bags, let alone trying to find bin space for one of them in a full CRJ. I discarded that advice and, as expected, my checked bag arrived at my final destination with a total wait time at the baggage claim of about 15 minutes. Anybody so important that they can't wait 15-30 minutes for a checked bag should probably be chartering an aircraft.

[Edited 2005-05-24 08:44:40]

User currently offlineStarlionblue From Greenland, joined Feb 2004, 17017 posts, RR: 67
Reply 19, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4037 times:

Quoting Jonathan L (Reply 18):
Anybody so important that they can't wait 15-30 minutes for a checked bag should probably be chartering an aircraft.

You don't get it. 15-20 minutes doesn't sound like much, but if you fly an average of twice a week this is quite a sizeable chunk of your time.

I agree that the rules could be enforced better, but I also submit that we road warriors are not the problem. Sure, we bring big carryons, but we stow them fast and efficiently. The worst are the leisure travelers who insist on carrying their Central American Kettle Drums on board. They're slow and take up a lot of space.



"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots."
User currently offlineVHXLR8 From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 500 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 4027 times:

Quoting JMV (Thread starter):
3) Flight attendants would have better attitudes knowing they wouldn't have to deal with surly passengers who insist on their steamer trunk should fit in the overhead bin

Hahahaha... Sorry, couldn't resist! Actually I fear that in your given scenario, flight attendants would have a worse time (and worse attitude) trying to get everyone's crap into smaller overhead lockers.


User currently offlineSchipholjfk From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 579 posts, RR: 6
Reply 21, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days ago) and read 3556 times:

Quoting Andz (Reply 4):
They do that here. I have always been astounded when flying in the US at how much crap people bring as "carry on".

It's not just the U.S.... people do it everywhere in the world now! Samsonite, Delsey, etc sell the same huge roll-on bags everywhere in the world and bins are pretty standard on planes. So it is not just us Americans, but the entire world does it.



The fun of flying... love it !!!
User currently offlineIsitsafenow From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4984 posts, RR: 23
Reply 22, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days ago) and read 3496 times:

Try this idea. The airlines are seeking new ways to "enhance revenue".
Rent the overhead space. A buck a bag no matter what it is, limit two. You can reserve the overhead space when you book, but you better use it or lose your buck.
The laptops and purses go UNDER and there is no charge.
Now theres a can of worms you all can sort out.

safe



If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
User currently offlineCkfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5216 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (9 years 3 months 2 days ago) and read 3493 times:

Bins were first installed, because the only items that could go overhead were coats and hats. The idea was that small items, such as briefcases and cosmetic cases could fit overhead.

AA and TW acutally had closets with several shelves for larger cases. These looked like the shelving units that you see on shuttle buses for rental cars and hotels. But as more seats went into cabins, the closets for suitcases came out.

If you reduce the size of overhead bins, then you will cause TSA to buy smaller scanning equipment. Then, every family traveling with a child is going to jam up the line, because the strollers and car seats won't fit.

Trust me on that one, because my son's stroller got jammed in an x-ray machine at the T-gates at ATL.


User currently offlineMKEdude From South Korea, joined May 2005, 1011 posts, RR: 1
Reply 24, posted (9 years 3 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 3426 times:

The point that smaller overhead bins would mean fewer carry-ons, and therefore quicker boarding and deplaning times is a valid one. However telling the average passenger (especally in the U.S.) that their carry-ons must be limited even further would go over like a fart in church!

It ain't gonna happen!



"You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline." Frank Zappa
25 Post contains links and images September11 : Interesting photos of VERY OLD cabin views 707 View Large View MediumPhoto © Mike Genovese 727 View Large View MediumPhoto © Mike Genovese D
26 Airbazar : Anyone who's ever travelled with a child will tell you that there is solution to that. It's called checking your bags at the gate, much like what is
27 RayChuang : I think what ICAO and IATA ought to do is to impose a reference standard for maximum-size/weight carry-on luggage. That way, you don't need so big ove
28 LTBEWR : With all of the well known 'horror stories' of what happens in checked baggage, it has encouraged more to go all carry on. This has been compounded by
29 Dallas74 : Instead of creating new rules how about we just enforce the current ones. 1. Two bags. Period. No two bags and a personal item. 2. Overstuffed back pa
30 CM767 : Curiously, I am convert of this, when I started to travel I hated to have carry on. For me, my passport on my pocket and a book was too much, I really
31 PipoA380 : I fully second that. It's once again all because some people have no respect for others and their egocentric behaviour annoys all the other - or mayb
32 Speedbird2155 : These are things that already happen in much of Europe. In T4 at LHR, there is a scale and BA usually has 2 members of staff to monitor carry-ons, pr
33 Andz : well said.
34 PHLBOS : Since 9/14/01, the carry-on rule (at least in the U.S.) has been one carry-on and one personal item. Another thing being overlooked here is the carry
35 BSU747 : The Aircraft crew should enforce better the rules on baggage so that if you have made it pass check in and the security checkpoint that if you have to
36 Ha763 : The only problem with those test bins are that they are actually slightly smaller than the actually overhead bins on the aircraft. Anyone remember wh
37 SLC1 : Exactly, and not only that, but there'd be people searching the plane for a place to put their bag. You should have seen a DL 738 from SEA to SLC whe
38 Starlionblue : And this wouldn't make boarding take longer? It's already de facto this way since the lower seat density means more bin space/pax. It's actually one
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