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"How Are The Rides Today?"  
User currently offlineRswando From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Posted (9 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 3167 times:

Is it me or have pilots (airline particularly) become obsessed with asking how the rides are. 10 years ago you rarely heard someone ask....now every swinging pilot checks on and queries...."How are the rides today?...any ride reports....how the rides...rides...rides...rides" I have heard people descending into Florida with the whole state littered with level 3-4's and sure enough..."How are the rides"....and a controller pipe back "what do you think"...........

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineQuickmover From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2501 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (9 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3123 times:

If they can avoid turbulance and save my nerves by avoiding rough rides, they can ask all day long IMO.

I hate turbulance.


User currently offlineBarcode From Switzerland, joined Dec 2001, 678 posts, RR: 11
Reply 2, posted (9 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3117 times:

Possibly because passengers are willing to sue if god forbid, they should injure themselves whilst not having a seatbelt on. I've noticed that when flying in the U.S, most of my flights had the seatbelt sign on even when there was no turbulence. When I fly here at home, the seatbelt light goes off shortly after take-off only to come back on when the descent begins. During light turbulence, it's quite possible the seatbelt sign will be off.

So when I do see the seatbelt sign ping mid flight on my European jaunts, I can be pretty sure it's going to be rather bumpy, as in one TAP flight I was on with baggage falling out of the bins, and anything not bolted down (including people) went flying. Thankgod it was over very quickly.

In my experience, over here, we just buckle up and go through it unless it's going to reach the point where most pax will start screaming or something. The US seems completely different. But maybe this is just me ....


User currently offlineFlyAUA From Austria, joined May 2005, 4604 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (9 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3076 times:

Quoting Rswando (Thread starter):

At Maastricht upper area centre we advice pilots of the area and levels concerned upon entering our sector. It is at their own discrection what they decide to do but we obviously offer them alternatives such as
1) Climb above or descend below
2) Different routing to avoid
3) Early descent for destination aerodrome
Sometimes an aircraft already at it's ceiling will not be able to climb above the turbulence, but generally I haven't encountered pilots intentionally flying through rough weather!



Not drinking, also isn't a solution!
User currently offlineSNATH From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 3247 posts, RR: 22
Reply 4, posted (9 years 6 months 4 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 3060 times:

Quoting Barcode (Reply 2):
I've noticed that when flying in the U.S, most of my flights had the seatbelt sign on even when there was no turbulence.

I've flown extensively within the US, within Europe, and in between the two, on both US and European airlines. I can't say I have noticed any difference between the attitudes of the pilots. In fact, I vividly remember a UA B777 pilot who warned us, after take off (LHR to ORD, if I remember correctly), that he will turn on the seat belt sign on, only if things get worse than just a little chop (and, near ORD, they did).

Tony



Nikon: we don't want more pixels, we want better pixels.
User currently offlineRswando From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2916 times:

Im not talking about obvious safety related issues with turbulence. But, C'mon very single pilot checking on does not need task ATC how the rides are for that particular sector of airspace....it Congests the radios...and really what are they going to do for you....60 present of the time your going to have to stay put and ride out you "occasional, light to sometimes continuous.......

User currently offlineSonOfACaptain From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1747 posts, RR: 6
Reply 6, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2910 times:

Possibly because passengers are willing to sue if god forbid, they should injure themselves whilst not having a seatbelt on.

That would be funny if it wasn't true. The first year my dad worked for US, he and the captain (along with US) got sued because they "purposely" went into turbulence and hurt his back. The sad part about it, US didn't want to go to court so they payed him what he was asking for.

-SOAC



Non Illegitimi Carborundum
User currently offlineUAalltheway From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 2896 times:

Quoting Quickmover (Reply 1):
I hate turbulance.

What?!?!?!

Turbulance is like the greastest thing ever!!!


User currently offlineCoa764 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 328 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2873 times:

Quoting Rswando (Reply 5):
Im not talking about obvious safety related issues with turbulence. But, C'mon very single pilot checking on does not need task ATC how the rides are for that particular sector of airspace....it Congests the radios...and really what are they going to do for you....60 present of the time your going to have to stay put and ride out you "occasional, light to sometimes continuous.......

Turbulence related injuries are a high cost to airlines and the fact is it isn't the passengers that are being injured it is the Flight Attendants. Airlines have been aggressively trying to cut cost and OJI caused by enroute turbulence is a very easy cost to avoid.

As far as congesting the radio lets use Denver center high sector 32 (ZDV32) for example and if you look at it on a chart it is a nice size piece of airspace. So there you are, just took your handoff, flying smooth on J82 and approaching RAP at 340 when you start picking up wave action off the Rockies. What are you going to do, listen for ride reports or ask you controller were the smooth air is? If your waiting for ride reports to figure it out yourself you might get some bad info as you have no idea were and what flight level that other comm is coming from, in fact you might just be listening to a ride report from a flight at that just past DDY on J158 at 320. So how is information coming from a completely different side of the sector helping you? The most efficient way for the crews to find smooth air is ask the controller what altitudes are clear.



Please oh please Mr Moderator Nazi, dont delete my thread.
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2868 times:

Quoting Rswando (Reply 5):
Im not talking about obvious safety related issues with turbulence. But, C'mon very single pilot checking on does not need task ATC how the rides are for that particular sector of airspace....it Congests the radios...and really what are they going to do for you....60 present of the time your going to have to stay put and ride out you "occasional, light to sometimes continuous.......

Sorry, but I disagree. First of all, my responsibility as a Captain, is to give my passengers the safest service I can from point A to point B. Turbulence is part of the equation. Passenger comfort comes next. If I can provide them a smoother ride via an alternative route/altitude, I'll do that.

Center knows this and is very responsive. It's part of their job, just as it is part of mine. Sorry if you're disturbed but tough luck!


User currently offlineFlyAUA From Austria, joined May 2005, 4604 posts, RR: 56
Reply 10, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2789 times:

Quoting PhilSquares (Reply 9):
Sorry, but I disagree. First of all, my responsibility as a Captain, is to give my passengers the safest service I can from point A to point B. Turbulence is part of the equation. Passenger comfort comes next. If I can provide them a smoother ride via an alternative route/altitude, I'll do that.

And in Maastricht we do just that to enable you to execute this task  tongue 

So for you disbelievers... no, the planes don't just continue flying! It's not that simple.



Not drinking, also isn't a solution!
User currently offlinePMN From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2005, 563 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 2764 times:

Quoting UAalltheway (Reply 7):
Turbulance is like the greastest thing ever!!!

Normally I'd agree, although a rather bumpy flight with BA from LHR to MAN last Sunday after being awake 34 hours and seriously needing sleep was not fun. It's the first time I've ever been glad to get off a plane (I must have been REALLY tired!)

Paul



Edith in his bed, a plane in the rain is humming, the wires in the walls are humming some song - some mysterious song
User currently offlineBucky707 From United States of America, joined Aug 2000, 1028 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2719 times:

"Im not talking about obvious safety related issues with turbulence. But, C'mon very single pilot checking on does not need task ATC how the rides are for that particular sector of airspace....it Congests the radios...and really what are they going to do for you"


I agree. Also, I think if the rides are bad, ATC tend to tell you when you check on.


User currently offlineSeven3seven From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 319 posts, RR: 23
Reply 13, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 2724 times:

Anyone who thinks pilots are annoying for asking about the ride reports is obviously an amateur rookie. We ask because the ride is the most important thing to our customers. Sometimes ATC is less than forethcoming with info, so we have to ask.

And anyone who likes turbulence is obviously a rookie too. Fly more than once a year and it gets really annoying. Especially when you fly several days a week.

I'm so sick of know it alls on here who think they know everything when they don't have a clue



My views are mine alone and are not that of any of my fellow employees, officers, or directors at my company
User currently offlineFlyAUA From Austria, joined May 2005, 4604 posts, RR: 56
Reply 14, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 2692 times:

Quote:
"Im not talking about obvious safety related issues with turbulence. But, C'mon very single pilot checking on does not need task ATC how the rides are for that particular sector of airspace....it Congests the radios...and really what are they going to do for you"

Pilots here at the center don't do that. WE tell THEM when there's need for concern... no more unecessary RT congestion  Wink



Not drinking, also isn't a solution!
User currently offlineSonOfACaptain From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1747 posts, RR: 6
Reply 15, posted (9 years 6 months 3 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 2594 times:

And anyone who likes turbulence is obviously a rookie too. Fly more than once a year and it gets really annoying. Especially when you fly several days a week.

Funny, because I know somebody who probably has twice (if not more) as much experience and has more ratings on aircrafts than you will ever imagine, and he still enjoys turbulence. I don't think it would be "annoying" for pilots, I think routine is a better word.

-SOAC



Non Illegitimi Carborundum
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