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Have You Ever Seen A Crew In Action?  
User currently offlineFlyGuyClt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 6219 times:

Hello one and all. Seems on some threads today people are bashing airline crew members once again. So, I pose this question to you. Have you ever gotten to see a crew in action? Have you ever been on an airplane where you saw things change in a split second and the crew without delay went into action? Where they did their job and the outcome was good?


I have witnessed a man have a heart attack before the days of the defibrillator, the fast acting crew started C.P.R. Luckily 2 rows over a Cardioligist and his nurse where returning from a convention, helped the crew, used the crew and supplies on board and the passenger lived. Humans working together. What a great concept.

The other day on the A&E show Airline, a man got to meet the flight attendant who saved his life by using a defibrillator. The man's family needless to say was very greatfull.


Anyone remember Kelly Duncan? A flight attendant with Air Florida, saved lives in the Potomac River.

How about Uli Derekson? She was the flight attendant with T.W.A who is credited with saving many lives during the high jacking ordeal in 1985.

Anyone ever see the picture of the Northwest flight attendant with a baby in her arms and foam all over herself from an evacuation in NRT in the 90's? The mother freaked and gave the baby to the flight attendant as she was jumping down the shute. The flight attendant came down the shute after the passengers where safely off with baby in hand.

How about stories of Heroism with crews from UA. The time half the side of the 747 tore off out of HNL? Or the crash in Sioux City?

There are many more. There unfortunately will be many more. But these crews are more than just the people who make or break your day. Do or don't always smile, give you that free upgrade or not. History has proven their worth. Don't believe me? Try google someday. There are plenty of stories of crews going above and beyond everyday. Are crew members perfect? Nah, but when you really need them. They are there. Period.

Safe Flying  Smile


Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
19 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline747400F From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 6193 times:

Quoting FlyGuyClt (Thread starter):
Nah, but when you really need them. They are there. Period.

some of them! And they should be - taht is way they are paid to be there.

the two MH stewards who alledgedly paniced - started paying and throwing drinks around- when their plane lost altitude - did not appear to be more that glorified waiters.


User currently offlineFlyGuyClt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 6174 times:

Quoting 747400F (Reply 1):
some of them! And they should be - taht is way they are paid to be there.

the two MH stewards who alledgedly paniced - started paying and throwing drinks around- when their plane lost altitude - did not appear to be more that glorified waiters.

I really have no idea of what you are trying to say. The question was, have you ever seen with your own two eyes a crew go in to action? Not rumor, not second hand information. You, just you, and only you.

Safe Flying  Smile



Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
User currently offline747400F From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 17 hours ago) and read 6153 times:

Quoting FlyGuyClt (Reply 2):
I really have no idea of what you are trying to say

check reply 1 in this thread and you'll know RE: Malaysian 125 Return To Perth With Problems (by ANstar Aug 2 2005 in Civil Aviation)

I merey reacted to your claim in the end of the thread starter.


User currently offlineRojo From Spain, joined Sep 2000, 2443 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 6073 times:

Yes, I was onboard a CM flight EZE-PTY and we were about to land at PTY when suddenly the pilot aborted the landing and went up. We started circling the city of Panama and passengers could tell that the crew were worried about something since they were walking through the cabin. They did not want to tell the passengers what was wrong, but you could see in their faces that something was indeed wrong. Since EZE-PTY is the longest scheduled flight for a B73G, we had been flying for 7 hours, so there shouldn't bee a lot of Jet A left. After almost an hour of going around the city of Panama, the pilot decided to make an emergency landing and cabin crew prepared passengers for it. Fire trucks were waiting at almost every point of the runway. We finally landed and it took almost all the runway for the aircraft to stop. The pilots never told us the problem, but I could figure out that we landed with the minimum flaps. I went to see the pilot after we parked at CM's hangar and he told me this was the first time something like this happened to him. He never expected problems with flaps on a brand new B737NG so he had to read manuals and lowered them manually!!! He also said that it was his longest schedule flight on a B73G with a total flying time of almost 8 hours without payload restrictions (full cabin and belly)!

User currently offlineEK773 From Malta, joined Jul 2004, 233 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6060 times:

747400F, i dont believe your ignorance. Just because it is the paid job of cabin crew doesnt mean that they should be more prepared to die or suffer any kind of injury then a fare paying passenger. I dont think you are a religious person but if you are (as i presume the MH crew were) then is there anything wrong with asking for divine intervention? And were you there to see them drop a tray of drinks?? Or was this tray dropped as the aircraft dropped altitude and the crew lost their balance. Open up your mind to a wider situation rather than your narrow views... please.

User currently offlineAirOrange From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 6003 times:

Route Rotterdam-Jersey: VLM Airlines Fokker 50 had a full computer drop out at starboard side somewhere above the North Sea short after take-off from Rotterdam while it was heading for the isle of Jersey. The FA was called immediately to the cockpit and after a few seconds the FA informed the passengers that the plane had to return to Rotterdam at once for immediate repair. Hundred minutes later we were already on route to Jersey with another VLM Fokker 50. I felt a bit nervous while it all happened high above the clouds...

User currently offlineRkFast From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 46 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 5907 times:

Word is (from the original thread on this topic) that the Capitan evacuated, flagged down a car and had it drive him to the hospital.

This cannot be true. Can someone please confirm its not?


User currently offlineMilan320 From Canada, joined Jan 2005, 869 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5615 times:

Quoting RkFast (Reply 7):
Word is (from the original thread on this topic) that the Capitan evacuated, flagged down a car and had it drive him to the hospital.

This cannot be true. Can someone please confirm its not?

French newspapers are reporting something completely different as are some of the English ones now. The FO was PF and after everyone got off the captain run up and down the aisles to check whether everyone disembarked and then he disembarked last after he was satisfied with the fact that no one was left on the plane.

/Milan320



I accept bribes ... :-)
User currently offlineCharliecossie From Germany, joined Oct 2001, 479 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5600 times:

I see BA pilots "in action" almost every day.
They can switch between The Times and Telegraph crosswords in a nanosecond. Has to be seen to be believed......


User currently offlineSAS-A321 From Denmark, joined Mar 2002, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 5329 times:

"The FO was PF and after everyone got off the captain run up and down the aisles to check whether everyone disembarked and then he disembarked last after he was satisfied with the fact that no one was left on the plane."

I was flying on jumpseat a week ago and before startup the captain informed me that if we had to evacuate through the cockpit windows I should go after the co-pilot, as he had to stay onboard and make sure that everyone had left the aircraft. I think that is a standard policy in all airlines.



It's Scandinavian
User currently offlineAloha73G From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2356 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (8 years 12 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 5291 times:

Michelle Honda on AQ 243 on April 28, 1988. The fuselage ripped off from behind the forward boarding door to just forward of the wings leaving many rows of passengers exposed. 1 F/A sucked out (the only fatality) and the other F/A was severely injured in the aisle at the front of the cabin being held down by passengers.

Michelle crawled up and down the aisle (exposed to the elements) putting on lifejackets and preparing passengers for an emergency landing. This has to be one of the--if not THE--most terrifying crashes/incidents to have been on. Michelle Honda is more living proof that when the going gets tough, F/As pull through and save people's lives with their training.

Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlineLuxair_ca From Luxembourg, joined Feb 2002, 54 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5101 times:

747400F

hope you are proud of what you are saying here!!!!!!!!!!


User currently offline747400F From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 13, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 5045 times:

Quoting Luxair_ca (Reply 12):
hope you are proud of what you are saying here!!!!!!!!!!

It is not a matter of pride. Just merely pointing out that trolley dollies have a job like everyone else - no more no less. Some do it well others don't.


User currently offlineQFA380 From Australia, joined Jul 2005, 2060 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 5005 times:

747400F you have no idea what some F/A's will do for other human beings. If you've ever watched Air Crash Investigation you'll see that F/A's really deserve every cent their being paid. Nearly every incident on that show the F/A's reduce the number of fatalities or save everyone on board. They are the real heroes today.

One incident in the Canary Islands( the worst aircraft crash in history) nearly everyone on board the Pan Am flight who survived did so thanks to th the help of the crew.

I don't want to ramble on about crashes but these people do an extraordinary job, although you might find the occasional crew member who might not do the best job they could most are amazing people.  angel  I truly believe these people deserve a  goldmedal 


User currently offlineChrisrad From Australia, joined Dec 2000, 1068 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 4952 times:

Quoting 747400F (Reply 1):
the two MH stewards who alledgedly paniced - started paying and throwing drinks around- when their plane lost altitude - did not appear to be more that glorified waiters

Perhaps you should read the article more clearly and not make false accusations, the drinks flew out of their hand when the plane dropped 200 meters. I would like to see how you would react in such a situation? Plastered on the cabin ceiling perhaps? and you point out MH which is well known in the industry to have the best cabin staff out there.



Welcome aboard Malaysia Airlines! Winner of Best Cabin Staff 2001,2002,2003,2004,2007,2009,2012
User currently offlineAsstChiefMark From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 4935 times:

FA's and nurses are a lot alike, IMHO. A lot of people only see me fluffing pillows, getting blankets, pouring water, and (ahem) eliminating elimination. But when an emergency arises, most of the charm disappears because there's a life-threatening situation to attend to. I don't have the think about it. I just know what needs to be done and do it. There's no doubt or second-guessing to it at all.

I admire FA's because of the long history of them placing passengers safety before their own. They rank up there with public safety workers in dedication to other's safety.

Mark


User currently offlineFlyGuyClt From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 537 posts, RR: 8
Reply 17, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4536 times:

Quoting Chrisrad (Reply 15):
Perhaps you should read the article more clearly and not make false accusations, the drinks flew out of their hand when the plane dropped 200 meters. I would like to see how you would react in such a situation? Plastered on the cabin ceiling perhaps? and you point out MH which is well known in the industry to have the best cabin staff out there.

Great point  Smile

Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 11):
Michelle Honda on AQ 243 on April 28, 1988. The fuselage ripped off from behind the forward boarding door to just forward of the wings leaving many rows of passengers exposed. 1 F/A sucked out (the only fatality) and the other F/A was severely injured in the aisle at the front of the cabin being held down by passengers.

Michelle crawled up and down the aisle (exposed to the elements) putting on lifejackets and preparing passengers for an emergency landing. This has to be one of the--if not THE--most terrifying crashes/incidents to have been on. Michelle Honda is more living proof that when the going gets tough, F/As pull through and save people's lives with their training.

Aloha!

A true hero indeed.

Thanks for sharing.

Safe Flying  Smile

Also, in the early 90's a Trans World Airlines L 1011 aborted take off in JFK. All the passengers and crew on this full L 1011 lived. The plane burned. The crew, yes the crew. Is credited with saving the lives. Some say, oh it is the passengers. If you put faith in your crew as a passenger, the likelihood of you surviving is sure to go up. The crew is trained and when you follow their directions in an evacation or abnormal situation, your % of survival does go up.

Remember, if you are ever in an evacuation. Listen to the crew. Look for the nearest "open" exit. In case your nearest exit is blocked. Ensure you know where alternative exits are. Don't ever go out an exit that has: Fire, high water level above the door or windowsill. Or any obstruction that would prevent you from using the exit. UNLESS, you absolutely have too and have no other choice. And please remember. NEVER EVER TAKE YOUR CARRY ONS. Move quickly, stay low and breath through your clothes if there is smoke. If you are one of the first down the shute. Hold one end of the shute have another help on the other end. Stay out of the way of the evacuating passengers.

Safe Flying  Smile



Florida Express, Braniff II and ......
User currently offlineBarcode From Switzerland, joined Dec 2001, 678 posts, RR: 11
Reply 18, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4454 times:

Somewhat minor incident on a VS EWR-LHR flight a few years ago. The woman sitting in the row behind me had breathing difficulties (panic attack, asthma attack, I don't know). The crew cleared the surrounding rows and supplied us with drinks in the galley area. No big deal. They were quick, and the woman recovered within about 30 minutes, with the crew keeping an eye on her for the rest of the flight.

Hopefully, I'll never experience anything more serious.


User currently offlineEirjet From Ireland, joined Jul 2005, 330 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (8 years 12 months 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 4352 times:

Quoting 747400F (Reply 13):

The term 'trolley dollies' highlights the lack of consideration that some airline passengers have for F/A's. Although their may be a small percentage of attendants who come across as uncaring and suffering from "illusions of grandeur", the vast majority are professional and dedicated to their duties.

A work colleague of mine used to work with Ryanair many years ago, from the attitude she has towards her present job, I came to the conclusion that she had no interest in being an F/A long term and may have wished to get her hands on a rich pilot... however that is only one person I know of, I would by no means assume that this is across the board.

Getting back to the origional reason for this tread, I have never witnessed a flight crew in action, but from what I've seen, heard and read I believe that a good flight crew demonstrates team-work, quick reflexes aswell as controlled behaviour...



Aviation has a 100% record, we've never left one up there......
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