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What's Up With Canada's Iata Codes?  
User currently offlineFlyingZacko From Germany, joined May 2005, 583 posts, RR: 6
Posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 4306 times:

Hi everyone,

I was just looking through Canada's airport's IATA codes and realized that a couple of them actually do make sense, like YTR being Trenton or YHM being Hamilton. But most of them really don't make a whole lot of sense, especially YYZ, even though that is probably Canada's most important airports. All other countries' airports seem to make some sort of sense with the IATA codes, except the Canadian ones. Does anyone have an explanation for that?

Cheers,
Sebastian


Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLnglive1011yyz From Canada, joined Oct 2003, 1608 posts, RR: 15
Reply 1, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4269 times:

YTO = Toronto Island.

Don't know which one was first, but that might explain it.

1011yyz



Pack your bags, we're going on a sympathy trip!
User currently offlineFlyingZacko From Germany, joined May 2005, 583 posts, RR: 6
Reply 2, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4246 times:

YTZ that would be.

That would actually make sense though.

Cheers,
Sebastian



Canon 40D + 24-70 f/2.8 L + 70-200 f/4 L + Speedlite 430EX
User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8341 posts, RR: 23
Reply 3, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 4237 times:

YYZ may not make much sense but it's sure easy to remember.


This Website Censors Me
User currently offlineWhyWhyZed From Canada, joined Jan 2005, 914 posts, RR: 16
Reply 4, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 4151 times:

It should be YYY so when people say where they're flying into or out of, it would sound like they're embarrassed and want some pity!  Silly Afterall they just dished out big bucks just to use the airport  Smile

- Jason DePodesta


User currently offlineOlympus69 From Canada, joined Jun 2002, 1737 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 4032 times:

I believe that Canada agreed to use the letter Y as the initial letter of its IATA codes in order to minimize conflicts with US codes. Perhaps there was already a YTO in the USA at the time? There are a large number of airports the do use either the first and second letter or the first and last letter in the name for the last 2 letters of the code. Most of them are small community airports. The only two major cities that follow this system are YVR for Vancouver and YWG for Winnipeg.

User currently offlineRichardnhsv From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 473 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3996 times:

I found this on an old airpics forum... don't know how accurate, but it makes sense.

Has to do with the old (1920' and -30's) radiotelegraphy country codes.Countries were given blocks of one or two-letter combinations to assign to radiocommunication and telegraphy.USA received K and W,maybe others,Norway received the range from LA to LO.Norwegian fishing vessels even today have radio callsigns like LA-PS,LA-KB,etc.Norwegian airports were coded LAZV (Sola),LAFB (Fornebu),etc. LN is the code for airplanes.With the introduction of the MOTNE-network in Europe in the second half of the -50's,LAZV and LAFB became the present-day ENZV and ENFB.
Canada was a British colony and probably used a single letter given to Britain plus a three-letter code beginning with Y.When Canada became independent,it received the country designator C and kept the Y-combinations.Hence the ICAO designations CYUL with corresponding IATA code YUL.
In the USA,airports in the ICAO system are coded KJFK,KORD,KLAX,etc.IATA:JFK,ORD,LAX. Radio- and TV-stations begin with K and W,followed by three letters.

Regards,
Richard



"If you've ever had a filet this good, welcome back." - Ruth Fertel
User currently offlineDimsum From Canada, joined Jan 2005, 91 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 3979 times:

Vancouver is YVR... that makes sense...

User currently offlinePeterpuck From Canada, joined Jun 2004, 323 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 3877 times:

Canada has been independent since 1867!

User currently offlineRobsawatsky From Canada, joined Dec 2003, 597 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 6 hours ago) and read 3799 times:

Quoting Peterpuck (Reply 8):
Canada has been independent since 1867!

Not really. The British North America Act brought together Quebec, Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia into Canada with its own union parliament and control over most domestic affairs BUT the mama country still had significant control in several key areas. Foreign affairs, entry into war, and the final court of appeal were all controlled by the UK. The Statute of Westminster in 1931 made Canada an equal partner in the Commonwealth but the legislation defining Canada was still an act under control of the UK until 1982 as were some levels of legal appeal to the UK Privy Council (not that the UK ever cared much to interfere for the previous several decades).


User currently offlineBCAL From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 3384 posts, RR: 15
Reply 10, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 3743 times:

I have heard a rumour that when IATA first created a complete list of airport codes, they noticed at the last minute that they had forgotten Canada which was hurriedly allocated the prefix code "Y".

 duck 



MOL on SRB's latest attack at BA: "It's like a little Chihuahua barking at a dying Labrador. Nobody cares."
User currently offlineSlawko From Canada, joined May 1999, 3799 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3686 times:

Would be kind of hard for IATA to forget the country that it's based in, I think!!!!

The Y designation is a throw back from the railroad days, and the early days of radio. The rail road coded TO, MQ, VR, WG, etc etc were used for rail traffic, the Y designation was given to cities with specific radio aids/frequencies. Just like TV and Radio stations got CF CH, Airports because they had their own frequencies and equipment got CY and CZ. So when it came to handing out city and airport designations toronto to CYTO, montreal CYMQ, Vancouver got CYVR and so on, IATA's three letter reservations codes got the same, just without the C. Cities with more then one airport, like Toronto and Montreal got a city code CYTO, and CYMQ(I think) and specific airports codes YYZ, YUL, YTZ, YMX etc, etc.



"Clive Beddoe says he favours competition, but his actions do not support that idea." Robert Milton - CEO Air Canada
User currently offlineCornish From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2005, 8187 posts, RR: 54
Reply 12, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3664 times:

Quoting BCAL (Reply 10):
I have heard a rumour that when IATA first created a complete list of airport codes, they noticed at the last minute that they had forgotten Canada which was hurriedly allocated the prefix code "Y".

That's actually the story I heard when I used to work at IATA !

Quoting Slawko (Reply 11):
Would be kind of hard for IATA to forget the country that it's based in, I think!!!!

Well half-based there actually - and the power is elsewhere. Montreal is more admin, sales and marketing these days....



Just when I thought I could see light at the end of the tunnel, it was some B*****d with a torch bringing me more work
User currently offlineBCAL From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2004, 3384 posts, RR: 15
Reply 13, posted (9 years 3 months 3 weeks 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 3648 times:

Quoting Slawko (Reply 11):
Would be kind of hard for IATA to forget the country that it's based in, I think!!!!

I was recently at a meeting of executives where they were planning the evacuation procedures of staff from the office in the event of a terrorist attack. The meeting concluded and all executives were congratulating one another as they thought they had completed some brilliant planning for the evacuation of staff. Drinks and laughter followed when suddenly someone mentioned that nobody had considered the evacuation procedures for the executives. The meeting quickly reconvened with embarrassed faces.

Could this not have happened at the IATA convention?



MOL on SRB's latest attack at BA: "It's like a little Chihuahua barking at a dying Labrador. Nobody cares."
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